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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Baird, Peter; Walter, Johanna; Landers, Patrick; Timm, Jonathan; Luczywek, Beata
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    The state of Kansas created the Child Support Savings Initiative (CSSI) in 2013 to help parents who owe child support pay off debt that is owed to the state while also saving for their children’s future higher education. The program aims to encourage parents to make qualifying deposits into tax advantaged college savings plans — 529 accounts — administered by the state. In return, the parents receive matching reductions in their child support debts. Kansas originally created CSSI only for parents who owed child support debts to the state. When Kansas decided it wanted to expand CSSI to debts owed the parents receiving child support, it needed to find an alternate source of funding to pay off those debts. It was able to do so in 2014 with funding from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, and under that grant MDRC received a contract to provide technical assistance and conduct an evaluation in conjunction with the expansion. (Excerpt from overview)

    The state of Kansas created the Child Support Savings Initiative (CSSI) in 2013 to help parents who owe child support pay off debt that is owed to the state while also saving for their children’s future higher education. The program aims to encourage parents to make qualifying deposits into tax advantaged college savings plans — 529 accounts — administered by the state. In return, the parents receive matching reductions in their child support debts. Kansas originally created CSSI only for parents who owed child support debts to the state. When Kansas decided it wanted to expand CSSI to debts owed the parents receiving child support, it needed to find an alternate source of funding to pay off those debts. It was able to do so in 2014 with funding from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, and under that grant MDRC received a contract to provide technical assistance and conduct an evaluation in conjunction with the expansion. (Excerpt from overview)

  • Individual Author: Miller, Cynthia; Katz, Lawrence F.; Azurdia, Gilda; Isen, Adam; Schultz, Caroline
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This report presents interim findings from the test of Paycheck Plus in New York City, presenting the proportion of participants who actually received the expanded credit in the first two years, and the credit’s effects over that time on income, work, earnings, tax filing, and child support payments. The findings are consistent with research on the federal EITC showing that an expanded credit can increase after-transfer incomes and encourage employment without creating work disincentives. Later reports will examine effects after three years on income, work, and other measures of well-being, in both New York City and Atlanta. (Edited author executive summary)

    This report presents interim findings from the test of Paycheck Plus in New York City, presenting the proportion of participants who actually received the expanded credit in the first two years, and the credit’s effects over that time on income, work, earnings, tax filing, and child support payments. The findings are consistent with research on the federal EITC showing that an expanded credit can increase after-transfer incomes and encourage employment without creating work disincentives. Later reports will examine effects after three years on income, work, and other measures of well-being, in both New York City and Atlanta. (Edited author executive summary)

  • Individual Author: Schroeder, Daniel; Patnaik, Ashweeta
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    In 1995 the Texas Legislature authorized the Office of the Attorney General (OAG) to improve child support services statewide through the creation of an Integrated Child Support System (ICSS) wherein the OAG may provide IV-D child support enforcement services under contract with counties that elect to participate in the system. The OAG sought and was granted a waiver from the Federal Office of Child Support Enforcement (OCSE) of the requirement for a written application for IV-D services in participating ICSS counties. The waiver was renewed several times, but with the last approval the OAG was required to have the program independently evaluated. The OAG contracted with the Ray Marshall Center for the Study of Human Resources (RMC) to design and conduct an evaluation to measure the impacts of ICSS, the results of which are included in this final report.  The Ray Marshall Center conducted the ICSS waiver evaluation using a combination of random assignment and composite pre-post evaluation designs to measure the impacts of the waiver at the county level. The evaluation relied...

    In 1995 the Texas Legislature authorized the Office of the Attorney General (OAG) to improve child support services statewide through the creation of an Integrated Child Support System (ICSS) wherein the OAG may provide IV-D child support enforcement services under contract with counties that elect to participate in the system. The OAG sought and was granted a waiver from the Federal Office of Child Support Enforcement (OCSE) of the requirement for a written application for IV-D services in participating ICSS counties. The waiver was renewed several times, but with the last approval the OAG was required to have the program independently evaluated. The OAG contracted with the Ray Marshall Center for the Study of Human Resources (RMC) to design and conduct an evaluation to measure the impacts of ICSS, the results of which are included in this final report.  The Ray Marshall Center conducted the ICSS waiver evaluation using a combination of random assignment and composite pre-post evaluation designs to measure the impacts of the waiver at the county level. The evaluation relied primarily on OAG administrative records data, Unemployment Insurance (UI) wage records, public assistance administrative records data, U.S. Bureau of the Census data, and other sources. These were used for estimating net impacts and for identifying relevant factors that may influence or be associated with the observed impacts. A process study provided a sufficient understanding of the structure and functioning of ICSS as implemented in order to accurately estimate the impacts of the waiver. The key research question for the impact analysis was: What effect did the ICSS waiver have on the collection and enforcement of child support in areas in which it was implemented? (Excerpt from author executive summary)

  • Individual Author: Gubits, Daniel; Spellman, Brooke; Dunton, Lauren; Brown, Scott; Wood, Michelle
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    This report presents results from the early implementation of the study of the Impact of Housing and Services Interventions for Homeless Families, referred to here as the Family Options Study. The Family Options Study is being sponsored by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to measure the relative impacts of four interventions commonly employed within local communities to help families experiencing homelessness. The study compares the impacts of: community-based rapid re-housing (CBRR), project-based transitional housing (PBTH), permanent housing subsidies (SUB), and the usual care (UC) emergency shelter system in 12 communities.

    This interim report describes the baseline characteristics of the families enrolled in the study and the housing and services interventions the families were offered. The report also describes the study’s design and implementation and provides preliminary information about the extent to which families have enrolled in the assigned interventions. A subsequent document (in 2014) will report on the impacts of the four...

    This report presents results from the early implementation of the study of the Impact of Housing and Services Interventions for Homeless Families, referred to here as the Family Options Study. The Family Options Study is being sponsored by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to measure the relative impacts of four interventions commonly employed within local communities to help families experiencing homelessness. The study compares the impacts of: community-based rapid re-housing (CBRR), project-based transitional housing (PBTH), permanent housing subsidies (SUB), and the usual care (UC) emergency shelter system in 12 communities.

    This interim report describes the baseline characteristics of the families enrolled in the study and the housing and services interventions the families were offered. The report also describes the study’s design and implementation and provides preliminary information about the extent to which families have enrolled in the assigned interventions. A subsequent document (in 2014) will report on the impacts of the four interventions and their relative costs. The impact analysis will use data collected from a survey of families 18 months after random assignment as well as administrative data measuring receipt of HUD assistance and data on returns to shelter from local Homeless Management Information Systems (HMIS). The 18-month follow-up survey began in July 2012 and will continue through September 2013. The research team will also prepare a series of short issue briefs to discuss additional findings that may be relevant to policymakers, practitioners, and researchers. (author abstract) 

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