Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Blumenthal, Anne; Shanks, Trina R.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2019

    As they are a long-term policy instrument, the results of many child savings account (CSA) programs take decades to realize. Because of this, important questions regarding the long-term impacts of the programs, as well as participants' perceptions regarding the programs' long-term impacts, are unanswered. In this study, we present findings from a qualitatively driven complex mixed methods follow-up of the first large CSA demonstration project, the quasi-experimental Michigan Saving for Education, Entrepreneurship, and Downpayment (SEED) program. We asked SEED account-holding and non-account-holding families how they communicated about college, saving for college, and future educational attainment, nearly ten years after the CSA demonstration project ended. In a novel approach, we conducted separate semi-structured interviews with dyads of parents and children, combining that information with survey data and account balance monitoring data, ultimately gaining a multidimensional picture of how families with and without SEED accounts were approaching planning for post-secondary...

    As they are a long-term policy instrument, the results of many child savings account (CSA) programs take decades to realize. Because of this, important questions regarding the long-term impacts of the programs, as well as participants' perceptions regarding the programs' long-term impacts, are unanswered. In this study, we present findings from a qualitatively driven complex mixed methods follow-up of the first large CSA demonstration project, the quasi-experimental Michigan Saving for Education, Entrepreneurship, and Downpayment (SEED) program. We asked SEED account-holding and non-account-holding families how they communicated about college, saving for college, and future educational attainment, nearly ten years after the CSA demonstration project ended. In a novel approach, we conducted separate semi-structured interviews with dyads of parents and children, combining that information with survey data and account balance monitoring data, ultimately gaining a multidimensional picture of how families with and without SEED accounts were approaching planning for post-secondary education right before the transition to adulthood. We found that: (1) the vast majority of account-holding families did not make withdrawals from their SEED accounts, (2) recent family communication about the SEED accounts was related to the specificity of a child's post-secondary plans, (3) there were tensions between college aspirations and the concrete steps needed to get there, and (4) families voiced concerns regarding the substantial barriers to post-secondary education. These findings point to both the promises and challenges of CSAs that newly developed programs might want to consider. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Mikelson, Kelly S.; Eyster, Lauren ; Durham, Christin; Cohen, Elissa
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    The Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training (TAACCCT) grant program is a $2 billion federal workforce investment aimed at helping community colleges across the nation increase their capacity to provide education and training programs for in-demand jobs. This brief is one of four briefs from the national evaluation of the TAACCCT grants produced by The Urban Institute under contract to the US Department of Labor. The four briefs discuss 1) TAACCCT grant goals, design, and evaluation; 2) TAACCCT grantee characteristics; 3) TAACCCT grant approaches, industries, and partnerships; and 4) early results from the TAACCCT grants. (Author abstract)

     

    The Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training (TAACCCT) grant program is a $2 billion federal workforce investment aimed at helping community colleges across the nation increase their capacity to provide education and training programs for in-demand jobs. This brief is one of four briefs from the national evaluation of the TAACCCT grants produced by The Urban Institute under contract to the US Department of Labor. The four briefs discuss 1) TAACCCT grant goals, design, and evaluation; 2) TAACCCT grantee characteristics; 3) TAACCCT grant approaches, industries, and partnerships; and 4) early results from the TAACCCT grants. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Baird, Peter; Walter, Johanna; Landers, Patrick; Timm, Jonathan; Luczywek, Beata
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    The state of Kansas created the Child Support Savings Initiative (CSSI) in 2013 to help parents who owe child support pay off debt that is owed to the state while also saving for their children’s future higher education. The program aims to encourage parents to make qualifying deposits into tax advantaged college savings plans — 529 accounts — administered by the state. In return, the parents receive matching reductions in their child support debts. Kansas originally created CSSI only for parents who owed child support debts to the state. When Kansas decided it wanted to expand CSSI to debts owed the parents receiving child support, it needed to find an alternate source of funding to pay off those debts. It was able to do so in 2014 with funding from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, and under that grant MDRC received a contract to provide technical assistance and conduct an evaluation in conjunction with the expansion. (Excerpt from overview)

    The state of Kansas created the Child Support Savings Initiative (CSSI) in 2013 to help parents who owe child support pay off debt that is owed to the state while also saving for their children’s future higher education. The program aims to encourage parents to make qualifying deposits into tax advantaged college savings plans — 529 accounts — administered by the state. In return, the parents receive matching reductions in their child support debts. Kansas originally created CSSI only for parents who owed child support debts to the state. When Kansas decided it wanted to expand CSSI to debts owed the parents receiving child support, it needed to find an alternate source of funding to pay off those debts. It was able to do so in 2014 with funding from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, and under that grant MDRC received a contract to provide technical assistance and conduct an evaluation in conjunction with the expansion. (Excerpt from overview)

  • Individual Author: Schroeder, Daniel; Patnaik, Ashweeta
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    In 1995 the Texas Legislature authorized the Office of the Attorney General (OAG) to improve child support services statewide through the creation of an Integrated Child Support System (ICSS) wherein the OAG may provide IV-D child support enforcement services under contract with counties that elect to participate in the system. The OAG sought and was granted a waiver from the Federal Office of Child Support Enforcement (OCSE) of the requirement for a written application for IV-D services in participating ICSS counties. The waiver was renewed several times, but with the last approval the OAG was required to have the program independently evaluated. The OAG contracted with the Ray Marshall Center for the Study of Human Resources (RMC) to design and conduct an evaluation to measure the impacts of ICSS, the results of which are included in this final report.  The Ray Marshall Center conducted the ICSS waiver evaluation using a combination of random assignment and composite pre-post evaluation designs to measure the impacts of the waiver at the county level. The evaluation relied...

    In 1995 the Texas Legislature authorized the Office of the Attorney General (OAG) to improve child support services statewide through the creation of an Integrated Child Support System (ICSS) wherein the OAG may provide IV-D child support enforcement services under contract with counties that elect to participate in the system. The OAG sought and was granted a waiver from the Federal Office of Child Support Enforcement (OCSE) of the requirement for a written application for IV-D services in participating ICSS counties. The waiver was renewed several times, but with the last approval the OAG was required to have the program independently evaluated. The OAG contracted with the Ray Marshall Center for the Study of Human Resources (RMC) to design and conduct an evaluation to measure the impacts of ICSS, the results of which are included in this final report.  The Ray Marshall Center conducted the ICSS waiver evaluation using a combination of random assignment and composite pre-post evaluation designs to measure the impacts of the waiver at the county level. The evaluation relied primarily on OAG administrative records data, Unemployment Insurance (UI) wage records, public assistance administrative records data, U.S. Bureau of the Census data, and other sources. These were used for estimating net impacts and for identifying relevant factors that may influence or be associated with the observed impacts. A process study provided a sufficient understanding of the structure and functioning of ICSS as implemented in order to accurately estimate the impacts of the waiver. The key research question for the impact analysis was: What effect did the ICSS waiver have on the collection and enforcement of child support in areas in which it was implemented? (Excerpt from author executive summary)

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 2016 to 2019

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations