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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Kneebone, Elizabeth; Berube, Alan
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2013

    Kneebone and Berube paint a new picture of poverty in America as well as the best ways to combat it. Confronting Suburban Poverty in America offers a series of workable recommendations for public, private, and nonprofit leaders seeking to modernize poverty alleviation and community development strategies and connect residents with economic opportunity. The authors highlight efforts in metro areas where local leaders are learning how to do more with less and adjusting their approaches to address the metropolitan scale of poverty —for example, integrating services and service delivery, collaborating across sectors and jurisdictions, and using data-driven and flexible funding strategies. (author abstract)

    Kneebone and Berube paint a new picture of poverty in America as well as the best ways to combat it. Confronting Suburban Poverty in America offers a series of workable recommendations for public, private, and nonprofit leaders seeking to modernize poverty alleviation and community development strategies and connect residents with economic opportunity. The authors highlight efforts in metro areas where local leaders are learning how to do more with less and adjusting their approaches to address the metropolitan scale of poverty —for example, integrating services and service delivery, collaborating across sectors and jurisdictions, and using data-driven and flexible funding strategies. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Attoh, Kafui A.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2012

     Drawing on the idea of the right to the city, this paper focuses on the challenges facing the transportation disadvantaged in Syracuse, N.Y. This paper will begin by focusing on two programs aimed at transporting welfare recipients to work: the Rides for Work and Wheels for Work programs. This paper will then examine transit activism in Syracuse as it emerged, first in debates over wheelchair lifts on public buses in the 1980s and second as it has emerged in more contemporary organizing efforts aimed at promoting transit awareness. Through these four case studies, this paper argues that urban transportation polices necessarily shape the terms under which the transportation disadvantaged can assert their right to the city. (author abstract)

     Drawing on the idea of the right to the city, this paper focuses on the challenges facing the transportation disadvantaged in Syracuse, N.Y. This paper will begin by focusing on two programs aimed at transporting welfare recipients to work: the Rides for Work and Wheels for Work programs. This paper will then examine transit activism in Syracuse as it emerged, first in debates over wheelchair lifts on public buses in the 1980s and second as it has emerged in more contemporary organizing efforts aimed at promoting transit awareness. Through these four case studies, this paper argues that urban transportation polices necessarily shape the terms under which the transportation disadvantaged can assert their right to the city. (author abstract)