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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Office of Child Support Enforcement
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2016

    In the Behavioral Interventions for Child Support Services (BICS) demonstration project, the Office of Child Support Enforcement (OCSE) has competitively awarded grants to seven states and the District of Columbia to better understand individuals' behavior and decision-making ability when it comes to participating in the child support program.The five-year demonstration is exploring the potential relevance and application of behavioral economics principles to child support services, focusing on areas such as modification of orders and early engagement in the child support establishment process.

    The project launched on September 30, 2014, and builds on the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) project conducted by the Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation. Ohio, Texas and Washington's child support programs participated in BIAS and showed promising results. The eight sites participating in BICS are California, Colorado, the District of Columbia, Georgia, Ohio, Texas, Vermont, and Washington. (Author...

    In the Behavioral Interventions for Child Support Services (BICS) demonstration project, the Office of Child Support Enforcement (OCSE) has competitively awarded grants to seven states and the District of Columbia to better understand individuals' behavior and decision-making ability when it comes to participating in the child support program.The five-year demonstration is exploring the potential relevance and application of behavioral economics principles to child support services, focusing on areas such as modification of orders and early engagement in the child support establishment process.

    The project launched on September 30, 2014, and builds on the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) project conducted by the Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation. Ohio, Texas and Washington's child support programs participated in BIAS and showed promising results. The eight sites participating in BICS are California, Colorado, the District of Columbia, Georgia, Ohio, Texas, Vermont, and Washington. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Gubits, Daniel; Spellman, Brooke; Dunton, Lauren; Brown, Scott; Wood, Michelle
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    This report presents results from the early implementation of the study of the Impact of Housing and Services Interventions for Homeless Families, referred to here as the Family Options Study. The Family Options Study is being sponsored by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to measure the relative impacts of four interventions commonly employed within local communities to help families experiencing homelessness. The study compares the impacts of: community-based rapid re-housing (CBRR), project-based transitional housing (PBTH), permanent housing subsidies (SUB), and the usual care (UC) emergency shelter system in 12 communities.

    This interim report describes the baseline characteristics of the families enrolled in the study and the housing and services interventions the families were offered. The report also describes the study’s design and implementation and provides preliminary information about the extent to which families have enrolled in the assigned interventions. A subsequent document (in 2014) will report on the impacts of the four...

    This report presents results from the early implementation of the study of the Impact of Housing and Services Interventions for Homeless Families, referred to here as the Family Options Study. The Family Options Study is being sponsored by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to measure the relative impacts of four interventions commonly employed within local communities to help families experiencing homelessness. The study compares the impacts of: community-based rapid re-housing (CBRR), project-based transitional housing (PBTH), permanent housing subsidies (SUB), and the usual care (UC) emergency shelter system in 12 communities.

    This interim report describes the baseline characteristics of the families enrolled in the study and the housing and services interventions the families were offered. The report also describes the study’s design and implementation and provides preliminary information about the extent to which families have enrolled in the assigned interventions. A subsequent document (in 2014) will report on the impacts of the four interventions and their relative costs. The impact analysis will use data collected from a survey of families 18 months after random assignment as well as administrative data measuring receipt of HUD assistance and data on returns to shelter from local Homeless Management Information Systems (HMIS). The 18-month follow-up survey began in July 2012 and will continue through September 2013. The research team will also prepare a series of short issue briefs to discuss additional findings that may be relevant to policymakers, practitioners, and researchers. (author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Eberts, Randall W.; O'Leary, Christopher J.; Wandmer, Stephen A.
    Year: 2002

    This book offers a thorough overview of the U.S. experience with targeting reemployment services and self-employment assistance to UI beneficiaries most likely to exhaust benefits. The authors also suggest other programs that might benefit from targeting, examine Canadian efforts at targeting reemployment services, and consider prospects for a new Frontline Decision Support System for one-stop centers. (author abstract)

    Contents:

    1. Targeting Employment Services under the Workforce Investment Act / Stephen A. Wandner
    2. Predicting the Exhaustion of Unemployment Compensation / Robert B. Olsen, Marisa Kelso, Paul T. Decker, and Daniel H. Klepinger ; comments by Mark C. Berger
    3. Evaluation of WPRS Systems / Katherine P. Dickinson, Paul T. Decker, and Suzanne D. Kreutzer ; comments by John Heinberg, Walter Nicholson
    4. A Panel Discussion on the WPRS System / Pete Fleming, Al Jaloviar, Helen Parker, and Marc Perrett ; comments by David E. Balducchi
    5. Profiling in Self-Employment Assistance Programs / Jon C. Messenger, Carolyn...

    This book offers a thorough overview of the U.S. experience with targeting reemployment services and self-employment assistance to UI beneficiaries most likely to exhaust benefits. The authors also suggest other programs that might benefit from targeting, examine Canadian efforts at targeting reemployment services, and consider prospects for a new Frontline Decision Support System for one-stop centers. (author abstract)

    Contents:

    1. Targeting Employment Services under the Workforce Investment Act / Stephen A. Wandner
    2. Predicting the Exhaustion of Unemployment Compensation / Robert B. Olsen, Marisa Kelso, Paul T. Decker, and Daniel H. Klepinger ; comments by Mark C. Berger
    3. Evaluation of WPRS Systems / Katherine P. Dickinson, Paul T. Decker, and Suzanne D. Kreutzer ; comments by John Heinberg, Walter Nicholson
    4. A Panel Discussion on the WPRS System / Pete Fleming, Al Jaloviar, Helen Parker, and Marc Perrett ; comments by David E. Balducchi
    5. Profiling in Self-Employment Assistance Programs / Jon C. Messenger, Carolyn Peterson-Vaccaro, and Wayne Vroman ; comments by Jacob M. Benus, Wayne Gordon
    6. Targeting Reemployment Bonuses / Christopher J. O'Leary, Paul T. Decker, and Stephen A. Wandner ; comments by Jennifer Warlick
    7. Measures of Program Performance and the Training Choices of Displaced Workers / Louis Jacobson, Robert LaLonde, and Daniel Sullivan ; comments by Kevin Hollenbeck
    8. Using Statistical Assessment Tools to Target Services to Work First Participants / Randall W. Eberts
    9. Targeting Job Retention Services for Welfare Recipients / Anu Rangarajan, Peter Schochet, and Dexter Chu ; comments by Timothy J. Bartik, Don Oellerich
    10. Targeting Reemployment Services in Canada / Terry Colpitts ; comments by Jeffrey Smith
    11. Predicting Long-Term Unemployment in Canada: Prospects and Policy Implications / Ging Wong, Harold Henson, and Arun Roy ; comments by Jeffrey Smith
    12. A Frontline Decision Support System for One-Stop Centers / Randall W. Eberts, Christopher J. O'Leary, and Kelly J. DeRango ; comments by Helen Parker
    13. A Panel Discussion on the Experience and Future Plans of States / Rich Hobbie, Jim Finch, Chuck Middlebrooks, and Jack Weidenbach

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