Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Tran, Victoria; Dwyer, Kelly; Minton, Sarah
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2019

    If a single mother earns $25,000 per year, can she receive a subsidy to help pay for child care? What if she decides to attend a training program? If she does qualify for a subsidy, how much will she have to pay out of pocket? The answers to these questions depend on a family’s exact circumstances, including the ages of the children, the number of people in the family, income, and where they live. Child care subsidies are provided through a federal block grant program called the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF). CCDF provides funding to the States, Territories, and Tribes. They use the money to administer child care subsidy programs for low-income families. This brief provides a graphical overview of some of the CCDF policy differences across States/Territories. It includes information about eligibility requirements, family application and terms of authorization, family payments, and policies for providers. (Excerpt from author introduction)

    If a single mother earns $25,000 per year, can she receive a subsidy to help pay for child care? What if she decides to attend a training program? If she does qualify for a subsidy, how much will she have to pay out of pocket? The answers to these questions depend on a family’s exact circumstances, including the ages of the children, the number of people in the family, income, and where they live. Child care subsidies are provided through a federal block grant program called the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF). CCDF provides funding to the States, Territories, and Tribes. They use the money to administer child care subsidy programs for low-income families. This brief provides a graphical overview of some of the CCDF policy differences across States/Territories. It includes information about eligibility requirements, family application and terms of authorization, family payments, and policies for providers. (Excerpt from author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Forry, N.; Madill, R.; Shuey, E.; Halle, T; Ugarte, G; Borton, J.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2019

    These snapshots describe U.S. households’ costs for, and usage of, ECE in 2012, looking at differences by age of child, household income, and community urbanicity.

    • How Much Did Households in the United States Pay for Child Care in 2012? — An Examination of Differences by Child Age
    • How Much Did Households in the United States Pay for Child Care in 2012? — An Examination of Differences by Household Income
    • How Much Did Households in the United States Pay for Child Care in 2012? — An Examination of Differences by Community Urbanicity

    These snapshots use data from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE), a nationally representative study of U.S. households and early care and education providers conducted in 2012. (Author abstract)

     

    These snapshots describe U.S. households’ costs for, and usage of, ECE in 2012, looking at differences by age of child, household income, and community urbanicity.

    • How Much Did Households in the United States Pay for Child Care in 2012? — An Examination of Differences by Child Age
    • How Much Did Households in the United States Pay for Child Care in 2012? — An Examination of Differences by Household Income
    • How Much Did Households in the United States Pay for Child Care in 2012? — An Examination of Differences by Community Urbanicity

    These snapshots use data from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE), a nationally representative study of U.S. households and early care and education providers conducted in 2012. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Werner, Alan; Schwartz, Deena; Koralek, Robin; Loprest, Pamela; Sick, Nathan
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    This is the final report of the National Implementation Evaluation (NIE) of the Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG). In 2010, the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services awarded the first round of 5-year HPOG grants (HPOG 1.0) to 32 organizations in 23 states; five were tribal organizations. The purpose of the HPOG Program is to provide education and training to Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) recipients and other low-income individuals for occupations in the healthcare field that pay well and are expected to either experience labor shortages or be in high demand. HPOG 1.0 grantees designed and implemented programs to provide eligible participants with education, occupational training, and support and employment services to help them train for and find jobs in a variety of healthcare professions. (Author abstract) 

    This is the final report of the National Implementation Evaluation (NIE) of the Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG). In 2010, the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services awarded the first round of 5-year HPOG grants (HPOG 1.0) to 32 organizations in 23 states; five were tribal organizations. The purpose of the HPOG Program is to provide education and training to Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) recipients and other low-income individuals for occupations in the healthcare field that pay well and are expected to either experience labor shortages or be in high demand. HPOG 1.0 grantees designed and implemented programs to provide eligible participants with education, occupational training, and support and employment services to help them train for and find jobs in a variety of healthcare professions. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Tran, Victoria; Minton, Sarah; Haldar, Sweta; Giannarelli, Linda
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    If a child’s parents both work full-time and together earn $25,000 per year, can the family receive a subsidy to help pay for child care? What if one of the parents is a full-time student and not working? If the family does qualify for a subsidy, how much will they still have to pay out of pocket? The answers to these questions depend on a family’s exact circumstances, including: the ages of the children; the number of people in the family; income; where they live. Child care subsidies are provided through a federal block grant program called the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF). CCDF provides funding to the States, Territories, and Tribes. They use the money to administer child care subsidy programs for low-income families. This brief provides a graphic overview of some of the CCDF policy differences across States/Territories. It includes information about eligibility requirements; family application, terms of authorization, and redetermination; family payments; and policies for providers. (Author introduction)

    If a child’s parents both work full-time and together earn $25,000 per year, can the family receive a subsidy to help pay for child care? What if one of the parents is a full-time student and not working? If the family does qualify for a subsidy, how much will they still have to pay out of pocket? The answers to these questions depend on a family’s exact circumstances, including: the ages of the children; the number of people in the family; income; where they live. Child care subsidies are provided through a federal block grant program called the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF). CCDF provides funding to the States, Territories, and Tribes. They use the money to administer child care subsidy programs for low-income families. This brief provides a graphic overview of some of the CCDF policy differences across States/Territories. It includes information about eligibility requirements; family application, terms of authorization, and redetermination; family payments; and policies for providers. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Thompson, Megan; Minton, Sarah; Heffernan, Christine; Giannarelli, Linda
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    This brief is a companion to the 2016 Welfare Rules Databook and provides a graphical overview of selected state policy differences for TANF cash assistance. The policies are taken from the Welfare Rules Database (WRD), a database maintained by the Urban Institute and funded by the Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation within the Administration for Child and Families in the US Department of Health and Human Services.

    The WRD is a comprehensive resource for comparing cash assistance programs across all 50 states and the District of Columbia, researching changes across time in cash assistance rules within a single state or determining the rules governing cash assistance in one state at a point in time. The WRD provides in-depth information on a wide range of policy topics.

    The brief describes and presents policies related to initial eligibility, benefit amounts, and ongoing eligibility. The brief also provides information about additional resources available from the WRD. (Author abstract)

    This brief is a companion to the 2016 Welfare Rules Databook and provides a graphical overview of selected state policy differences for TANF cash assistance. The policies are taken from the Welfare Rules Database (WRD), a database maintained by the Urban Institute and funded by the Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation within the Administration for Child and Families in the US Department of Health and Human Services.

    The WRD is a comprehensive resource for comparing cash assistance programs across all 50 states and the District of Columbia, researching changes across time in cash assistance rules within a single state or determining the rules governing cash assistance in one state at a point in time. The WRD provides in-depth information on a wide range of policy topics.

    The brief describes and presents policies related to initial eligibility, benefit amounts, and ongoing eligibility. The brief also provides information about additional resources available from the WRD. (Author abstract)

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 2007 to 2019

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations