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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Denny-Brown, Noelle; Livermore, Gina; Shenk, Marisa; Morris, Eric
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    The SourceAmerica Pathways to Careers™ (Pathways) initiative relies upon state-of-the-art employment strategies to enable people with significant disabilities to have an informed choice of competitive, integrated, full-wage employment options that match their individual skills, interests, and abilities. In this report, we document the activities of the pilot Pathways project in Utah and the experiences of participants from the time this pilot project launched in May 2012 through December 2016, the fourth full year of implementation. During that time, the project enrolled 91 participants. This is the third of four primary reports that will describe the findings of the Pathways evaluation. The evaluation findings presented in this report are based on information collected from the project management information system; participant applications and follow-up surveys conducted 12 and 24 months after intake; and in-person interviews with staff and employers participating in the pilot Pathways project in Utah. We also analyzed project cost information and data on how Pathways staff in...

    The SourceAmerica Pathways to Careers™ (Pathways) initiative relies upon state-of-the-art employment strategies to enable people with significant disabilities to have an informed choice of competitive, integrated, full-wage employment options that match their individual skills, interests, and abilities. In this report, we document the activities of the pilot Pathways project in Utah and the experiences of participants from the time this pilot project launched in May 2012 through December 2016, the fourth full year of implementation. During that time, the project enrolled 91 participants. This is the third of four primary reports that will describe the findings of the Pathways evaluation. The evaluation findings presented in this report are based on information collected from the project management information system; participant applications and follow-up surveys conducted 12 and 24 months after intake; and in-person interviews with staff and employers participating in the pilot Pathways project in Utah. We also analyzed project cost information and data on how Pathways staff in the pilot project spend their time across various Pathways and non-Pathways activities. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Sacks, Vanessa; McGill, Brittany; Seefeldt, Kristin; Clum, Kim
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2016

    This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency contains a breakout session focusing on disconnected families--those in which adults are neither working nor receiving cash assistance. Panelists discussed the characteristics and circumstances of these families and barriers they face to self-sufficiency.

    This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency contains a breakout session focusing on disconnected families--those in which adults are neither working nor receiving cash assistance. Panelists discussed the characteristics and circumstances of these families and barriers they face to self-sufficiency.

  • Individual Author: Osborne, Cynthia; Dillon, Amanda
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    Cases involving active duty military personnel and veteran families within the child support system are often more complex in nature than those of the general population. Some of the complications arise as a result of institutional barriers between the child support system and the military system. These complications are then compounded by the nature of a service member’s job such as multiple moves, pay changes, paternity establishment during deployment, multiple deployments, year-long absences, and physical and mental disabilities that result from military service. To provide specialized support for active duty service members and veterans’ child support and parenting time needs, the Texas Office of the Attorney General – Child Support Division (OAG-CSD) developed the Help Establishing Responsive Orders and Ensuring Support (HEROES) for Children in Military Families pilot program. The HEROES project is designed to provide enhanced, family-centered child support services with the objectives of increasing compliance with current child support obligations; ensuring accurate...

    Cases involving active duty military personnel and veteran families within the child support system are often more complex in nature than those of the general population. Some of the complications arise as a result of institutional barriers between the child support system and the military system. These complications are then compounded by the nature of a service member’s job such as multiple moves, pay changes, paternity establishment during deployment, multiple deployments, year-long absences, and physical and mental disabilities that result from military service. To provide specialized support for active duty service members and veterans’ child support and parenting time needs, the Texas Office of the Attorney General – Child Support Division (OAG-CSD) developed the Help Establishing Responsive Orders and Ensuring Support (HEROES) for Children in Military Families pilot program. The HEROES project is designed to provide enhanced, family-centered child support services with the objectives of increasing compliance with current child support obligations; ensuring accurate establishment of support orders, expediting review and adjustments of orders; preventing the accumulation of arrears; and supporting increased parenting cooperation. The OAG-CSD asked Dr. Cynthia Osborne and CFRP to evaluate the implementation of the pilot program.  CFRP’s goals are to determine the unique challenges that military and veteran families face in regards to child support and parenting; document what the HEROES project has done to address these unique challenges; identify lessons learned through the pilot program that enhance or limit the successful implementation of the HEROES project; and provide recommendations to the OAG-CSD on how the HEROES project may address any challenges that arise. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Moreno, Manuel H.; Toros, Halil; Stevens, Max; Doan, Duc; Salem, Nancy; Beardsley, Julie
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2007

    The present study is a by-product of DPSS’ ongoing commitment to making child care services available to Los Angeles County’s Welfare-to-Work participants. For some time now, policymakers have attempted to understand why a large proportion of Welfare-to-Work participants fail to use the child care services available to them. This report identifies two major barriers to utilization: participant difficulty in establishing eligibility for child care services, and participant inability to gain approval for the child care requests they submit to Alternative Payment Program (APP) agencies. The research presented in this report indicates that significant proportions of CalWORKs participants have difficulties opening Welfare-to-Work components in the initial stages of their tenure in the program. The difficulties are likely related to a number of personal and program-level barriers. It will not be possible to fully grasp these initial barriers without conducting additional qualitative research. Nevertheless, participants who cannot attend program components are not able to make requests...

    The present study is a by-product of DPSS’ ongoing commitment to making child care services available to Los Angeles County’s Welfare-to-Work participants. For some time now, policymakers have attempted to understand why a large proportion of Welfare-to-Work participants fail to use the child care services available to them. This report identifies two major barriers to utilization: participant difficulty in establishing eligibility for child care services, and participant inability to gain approval for the child care requests they submit to Alternative Payment Program (APP) agencies. The research presented in this report indicates that significant proportions of CalWORKs participants have difficulties opening Welfare-to-Work components in the initial stages of their tenure in the program. The difficulties are likely related to a number of personal and program-level barriers. It will not be possible to fully grasp these initial barriers without conducting additional qualitative research. Nevertheless, participants who cannot attend program components are not able to make requests for child care services. Some participants may attempt to make these requests with no open component, but their eligibility for child care is nullified unless they are working or until they can take the steps necessary to move back into compliance with program requirements. Moreover, significant numbers of participants eligible for child care have the requests they make for services denied for various reasons that are examined in this report. At the same time, this report also shows that early establishment of eligibility dramatically increases the likelihood that participants will utilize the child care services available to them through the GAIN program. In turn, early eligibility appears to increase the likelihood that participants will remain in GAIN and make positive strides towards self-sufficiency.

    The findings in these pages, which are based on data collected from DPSS administrative records, were generated using three substantive modes of analysis, each of which occupies a substantive section in the report. Section I examines child care eligibility and utilization trends by looking at monthly snapshots. Section II tracks two different GAIN entry cohorts and creates a more dynamic understanding of eligibility and utilization issues through an analysis of the cumulative child care histories of GAIN participants. Section III uses regression models to demonstrate factors contributing to outcomes such as child care eligibility, child care utilization, and the denial of requests for child care services. The concluding section of the report summarizes the findings and offers a series of recommendations for policy enhancements that could improve the delivery of child care services to the participants who need them. Increasing participant access to child care will be a crucial part of the more general effort to continue making improvements in the CalWORKs program as welfare reform enters its second decade. It is our sincere hope that the findings presented in this report will provide valuable guidance in this direction. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Wood, Robert; Wheeler, Justin
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2006

    Spurred on by President Clinton’s promise “to end welfare as we know it,” Congress passed the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) in 1996. This federal welfare reform legislation made sweeping changes to federal welfare policy, imposing work requirements on recipients as a condition for cash assistance, as well as lifetime limits on benefit receipt. The legislation also gave states much greater flexibility in setting their specific welfare policies. It established the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program, which provides a block grant to states—or a fixed, guaranteed level of funding regardless of the number of families eligible for cash assistance. Under this funding arrangement, states have a great deal of latitude in choosing how they spend their federal TANF dollars and can spend these funds on a wide variety of programs, as long as they are consistent with the broad goals of TANF set out in the federal legislation.

    In the ten years since federal welfare reform, states have chosen a variety of approaches to...

    Spurred on by President Clinton’s promise “to end welfare as we know it,” Congress passed the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) in 1996. This federal welfare reform legislation made sweeping changes to federal welfare policy, imposing work requirements on recipients as a condition for cash assistance, as well as lifetime limits on benefit receipt. The legislation also gave states much greater flexibility in setting their specific welfare policies. It established the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program, which provides a block grant to states—or a fixed, guaranteed level of funding regardless of the number of families eligible for cash assistance. Under this funding arrangement, states have a great deal of latitude in choosing how they spend their federal TANF dollars and can spend these funds on a wide variety of programs, as long as they are consistent with the broad goals of TANF set out in the federal legislation.

    In the ten years since federal welfare reform, states have chosen a variety of approaches to implementing their TANF programs. Because of the greater flexibility offered to states by PRWORA, there is now substantially more state-to-state variation in welfare programs than there was in the years leading up to TANF. This paper takes a close look at the implementation of TANF in three states—New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania. We begin with a brief overview of the characteristics of the three states and their TANF caseloads. Next, we examine their basic TANF policies and how these policies compare to other states. We then describe their experiences with implementing these policies and provide more detail about the programs and services they offer TANF recipients in their states. We end the paper with a discussion of their TANF-related outcomes and how these compare to the rest of the United States. (author abstract)

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