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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Mincy, Ronald ; Sorensen, Elaine ; McLanahan, Sara ; Tach, Laura
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2015

    This presentation from the 2015 NAWRS workshop provides statistical trends related to employment, family formation, and child welfare in the US before making a number of policy reform recommendations that would support responsible fatherhood.

    This presentation from the 2015 NAWRS workshop provides statistical trends related to employment, family formation, and child welfare in the US before making a number of policy reform recommendations that would support responsible fatherhood.

  • Individual Author: Nepomnyaschy, Lenna; Donnelly, Louis
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2014

    In this study, we use nationally representative data from the U.S. Current Population Survey-Child Support Supplement (N = 28,047) to examine differences in nonresident fathers’ material contributions between children of native and foreign-born mothers. We focus on contributions provided through the formal child support system (whether the mother has a child support agreement and the amount received), as well as support provided informally (the amount of informal cash and whether she receives any in-kind support). We control for a variety of individual and household characteristics, including whether the nonresident father lives in a different state or in a different country. We find that foreign-born mothers are much less likely to have a child support agreement than native-born mothers, but have similar amounts of formal support, once an agreement is in place. Compared to native-born mothers, foreign-born mothers are also much less likely to receive in-kind support, but this difference is completely explained by fathers’ distance from the child. Foreign-born mothers do not...

    In this study, we use nationally representative data from the U.S. Current Population Survey-Child Support Supplement (N = 28,047) to examine differences in nonresident fathers’ material contributions between children of native and foreign-born mothers. We focus on contributions provided through the formal child support system (whether the mother has a child support agreement and the amount received), as well as support provided informally (the amount of informal cash and whether she receives any in-kind support). We control for a variety of individual and household characteristics, including whether the nonresident father lives in a different state or in a different country. We find that foreign-born mothers are much less likely to have a child support agreement than native-born mothers, but have similar amounts of formal support, once an agreement is in place. Compared to native-born mothers, foreign-born mothers are also much less likely to receive in-kind support, but this difference is completely explained by fathers’ distance from the child. Foreign-born mothers do not differ at all on the amount of informal cash support received from fathers. Nonresident fathers’ residence outside the U.S. is an important mechanism through which nativity affects the likelihood of having a child support order and receiving any in-kind support, but not the amount of formal support (given an order) or the amount of informal cash support. Aggregate comparisons mask important differences within the foreign-born group by mothers’ and children’s citizenship status, years in the U.S., and region of origin. (author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Choi, Jeong-Kyun; Palmer, Robert J.; Pyun, Ho-Soon
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2014

    This study examined the relationships among non-resident fathers’ involvement, mothers’ parenting and parenting stress, and children’s behavioural and cognitive development in low-income single-mother families. Based on the theoretical concepts of father involvement in terms of accessibility, responsibility and interaction, this study operationalizes fathers’ involvement with three different measures: (i) fathers’ frequency of contact with their children; (ii) fathers’ amount of child support payment; and (iii) fathers’ quality of parenting. Analyses used the first three waves of longitudinal data from a subsample of single and non-cohabiting mothers with low income in the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study. Results suggest that nonresident fathers’ child support payment is indirectly associated with both children’s behaviour problems and cognitive development. Fathers’ parenting is also found to be indirectly associated with children’s behaviour problems. The findings further suggest that those estimated associations are transmitted through mothers’ parenting. The...

    This study examined the relationships among non-resident fathers’ involvement, mothers’ parenting and parenting stress, and children’s behavioural and cognitive development in low-income single-mother families. Based on the theoretical concepts of father involvement in terms of accessibility, responsibility and interaction, this study operationalizes fathers’ involvement with three different measures: (i) fathers’ frequency of contact with their children; (ii) fathers’ amount of child support payment; and (iii) fathers’ quality of parenting. Analyses used the first three waves of longitudinal data from a subsample of single and non-cohabiting mothers with low income in the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study. Results suggest that nonresident fathers’ child support payment is indirectly associated with both children’s behaviour problems and cognitive development. Fathers’ parenting is also found to be indirectly associated with children’s behaviour problems. The findings further suggest that those estimated associations are transmitted through mothers’ parenting. The expected associations between fathers’ contact and child outcomes are not found in this sample. The study also discusses the policy and practice implications of its findings. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Hofferth, Sandra L.; Forroy, Nicole D.; Peters, H. Elizabeth
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2010

    This study examined how child support, frequency of contact with children, and the relationship between nonresidential parents influenced preteens’ reports of the involvement of fathers and mothers in their life. Data are from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79) that has followed the children of NLSY mothers from birth into their twenties. Results showed that increases in child support and in contact with the child over time after separation are linked to a better coparental relationship when children are age 11 or 12. This better relationship between parents is, in turn, associated with greater involvement of both mothers and nonresidential fathers with their children. (author abstract)

     

    This study examined how child support, frequency of contact with children, and the relationship between nonresidential parents influenced preteens’ reports of the involvement of fathers and mothers in their life. Data are from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79) that has followed the children of NLSY mothers from birth into their twenties. Results showed that increases in child support and in contact with the child over time after separation are linked to a better coparental relationship when children are age 11 or 12. This better relationship between parents is, in turn, associated with greater involvement of both mothers and nonresidential fathers with their children. (author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Huang, Chien-Chung
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2009

    Nonresident fathers’ financial support and time are both important to children’s well-being, although the association between these two types of involvement is mixed in the literature. Using the 1994 – 2004 waves of the Current Population Survey-Child Support Supplement, this article examined the associations between mothers’ reports of child support payments and visitation. The results indicated that about 36% of nonresident fathers did not visit their children at all, and the distribution of visitation was highly skewed. Therefore, zero-inflated Poisson regression was used, and the results indicated that the amount of child support payments was positively associated with the onset but not the frequency of visitation. Policy and research implications are discussed. (Author abstract)

    Nonresident fathers’ financial support and time are both important to children’s well-being, although the association between these two types of involvement is mixed in the literature. Using the 1994 – 2004 waves of the Current Population Survey-Child Support Supplement, this article examined the associations between mothers’ reports of child support payments and visitation. The results indicated that about 36% of nonresident fathers did not visit their children at all, and the distribution of visitation was highly skewed. Therefore, zero-inflated Poisson regression was used, and the results indicated that the amount of child support payments was positively associated with the onset but not the frequency of visitation. Policy and research implications are discussed. (Author abstract)