Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Thiebaud Nicoli, Lisa; Logan Passarella, Letitia
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This brief profiles families who received cash assistance in state fiscal years 2015 and 2016. In particular, the brief provides information about case characteristics as well as adult recipients’ demographics and work histories. (Author abstract)

    This brief profiles families who received cash assistance in state fiscal years 2015 and 2016. In particular, the brief provides information about case characteristics as well as adult recipients’ demographics and work histories. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Gleason, Elizabeth; Passarella, Letitia Logan
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    The federal IV-D child support program plays a vital role in ensuring that both parents contribute to the material needs of their children. According to the federal Office of Child Support Enforcement (OCSE), more than $28.5 billion was collected and distributed to families in federal fiscal year 2015, through both direct payments and income withholding (OCSE, 2016a). In Maryland, the Child Support Enforcement Administration (CSEA) collected and distributed 69% of current support due, over $533 million on behalf of families. These distributions help custodial parents care for their children and can make up a significant portion of household income for poor families (Sorensen, 2010). (Author abstract)

    The federal IV-D child support program plays a vital role in ensuring that both parents contribute to the material needs of their children. According to the federal Office of Child Support Enforcement (OCSE), more than $28.5 billion was collected and distributed to families in federal fiscal year 2015, through both direct payments and income withholding (OCSE, 2016a). In Maryland, the Child Support Enforcement Administration (CSEA) collected and distributed 69% of current support due, over $533 million on behalf of families. These distributions help custodial parents care for their children and can make up a significant portion of household income for poor families (Sorensen, 2010). (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Nicoli, Lisa T.; Gleason, Elizabeth; Passarella, Letitia L.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This report provides a comprehensive look at early Temporary Cash Assistance (TCA) leavers in Maryland over a 15-year span of time. Specifically, we examine outcomes for a sample of families who exited the TCA program from October 1996, the first month of TANF implementation in Maryland, through March 2000. We provide a profile of these early leavers and examine 15 years of their employment and earnings outcomes as well as their receipt of public assistance, including TCA, Food Supplement, and Medical Assistance. This information provides insight into the long-term experiences of Maryland’s early leavers affected by welfare reform. (Author abstract)

    This report provides a comprehensive look at early Temporary Cash Assistance (TCA) leavers in Maryland over a 15-year span of time. Specifically, we examine outcomes for a sample of families who exited the TCA program from October 1996, the first month of TANF implementation in Maryland, through March 2000. We provide a profile of these early leavers and examine 15 years of their employment and earnings outcomes as well as their receipt of public assistance, including TCA, Food Supplement, and Medical Assistance. This information provides insight into the long-term experiences of Maryland’s early leavers affected by welfare reform. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Mattingly, Marybeth J.; Wimer, Christopher T.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    How often are low-income families pushed into poverty by their child care expenses? In this fact sheet, we use the Supplemental Poverty Measure (SPM) to assess the extent to which child care expenses are pushing families with young children into poverty. Nearly one-third (30.4 percent) of families with young children are poor. To fall under the SPM poverty line means that a family's income would be less than $26,000 a year on average, with variations by family composition and geographic location. Among poor families with young children, 12.3 percent incur child care expenses according to our analyses of the SPM. For families earning this little income, child care expense can be a burden. Of those who pay for child care, nearly one in ten (9.4 percent) are poor (Figure 1). Roughly one third of these poor families are pushed into poverty by child care expenses. This represents an estimated 207,000 families. Among families with young children who pay for child care, those with three or more children, those headed by a single parent, those with black or Hispanic household heads, and...

    How often are low-income families pushed into poverty by their child care expenses? In this fact sheet, we use the Supplemental Poverty Measure (SPM) to assess the extent to which child care expenses are pushing families with young children into poverty. Nearly one-third (30.4 percent) of families with young children are poor. To fall under the SPM poverty line means that a family's income would be less than $26,000 a year on average, with variations by family composition and geographic location. Among poor families with young children, 12.3 percent incur child care expenses according to our analyses of the SPM. For families earning this little income, child care expense can be a burden. Of those who pay for child care, nearly one in ten (9.4 percent) are poor (Figure 1). Roughly one third of these poor families are pushed into poverty by child care expenses. This represents an estimated 207,000 families. Among families with young children who pay for child care, those with three or more children, those headed by a single parent, those with black or Hispanic household heads, and those headed by someone with less than a high school degree or by someone who does not work full time are most often pushed into poverty by child care expenses. Notably, these are also the families that tend to have the highest rates of poverty. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Bullinger, Lindsey Rose
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2017

    Objectives. To investigate the effect of minimum wage laws on adolescent birth rates in the United States. Methods. I used a difference-in-differences approach and vital statistics data measured quarterly at the state level from 2003 to 2014. All models included state covariates, state and quarter-year fixed effects, and state-specific quarter-year nonlinear time trends, which provided plausibly causal estimates of the effect of minimum wage on adolescent birth rates. Results. A $1 increase in minimum wage reduces adolescent birth rates by about 2%. The effects are driven by non-Hispanic White and Hispanic adolescents. Conclusions. Nationwide, increasing minimum wages by $1 would likely result in roughly 5000 fewer adolescent births annually. (Author abstract)

    Objectives. To investigate the effect of minimum wage laws on adolescent birth rates in the United States. Methods. I used a difference-in-differences approach and vital statistics data measured quarterly at the state level from 2003 to 2014. All models included state covariates, state and quarter-year fixed effects, and state-specific quarter-year nonlinear time trends, which provided plausibly causal estimates of the effect of minimum wage on adolescent birth rates. Results. A $1 increase in minimum wage reduces adolescent birth rates by about 2%. The effects are driven by non-Hispanic White and Hispanic adolescents. Conclusions. Nationwide, increasing minimum wages by $1 would likely result in roughly 5000 fewer adolescent births annually. (Author abstract)

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 1975 to 2017

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations