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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Paris, Ruth; Sommer, Amy; Marron, Beth
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2018

    In the context of increasing rates of opioid misuse, particularly by women of childbearing age with histories of trauma, this chapter describes the background, evidence base, conceptual framework, and practice parameters for an attachment-based evidence-informed dyadic intervention utilizing the principles of child-parent psychotherapy with mothers and infants impacted by substance use disorders (SUDs). A strong focus of this chapter is to elaborate on the emotional needs of mothers in early recovery as they enter into the parenting role and on the needs of substance-exposed newborns and their role in fragile infant-parent dyads. A case is presented at the end of the chapter so that readers are better able to conceptualize this novel application of dyadic psychotherapy. (Author abstract)

    In the context of increasing rates of opioid misuse, particularly by women of childbearing age with histories of trauma, this chapter describes the background, evidence base, conceptual framework, and practice parameters for an attachment-based evidence-informed dyadic intervention utilizing the principles of child-parent psychotherapy with mothers and infants impacted by substance use disorders (SUDs). A strong focus of this chapter is to elaborate on the emotional needs of mothers in early recovery as they enter into the parenting role and on the needs of substance-exposed newborns and their role in fragile infant-parent dyads. A case is presented at the end of the chapter so that readers are better able to conceptualize this novel application of dyadic psychotherapy. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: King Bowes, Kendra; Burrus, Barri B.; Axelson, Sarah; Garrido, Milagros; Kimbriel, Adriana ; Abramson, Lisa; Gorman, Gwenda; Dancer, Angela; White, Terrill; Beaudry, PJ
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2018

    Systemic inequities, including a lack of culturally appropriate sexual health education, put American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) adolescents at higher-than-average risk for adverse sexual and reproductive health outcomes. For example, in 2013, the birth rate among AI/AN adolescents aged 15 to 19 years was 31.1 per 1000 individuals, compared with 18.6 for White adolescents. AI/AN youths report earlier onset of sexual activity and greater numbers of sexual partners than do youths in general. In 2011, among all races and ethnicities, AI/ANs had the second highest rates of chlamydia and gonorrhea and the third highest rates of primary and secondary syphilis. From 2011 through 2014, the US Department of Health and Human Services’ Family and Youth Services Bureau, through the Tribal Personal Responsibility Education Program (Tribal PREP), funded 14 tribes and tribal organizations to select, adapt, and implement culturally relevant, evidence-informed contraceptive and abstinence education curricula for their communities. Grantees also promoted successful transitions to adulthood...

    Systemic inequities, including a lack of culturally appropriate sexual health education, put American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) adolescents at higher-than-average risk for adverse sexual and reproductive health outcomes. For example, in 2013, the birth rate among AI/AN adolescents aged 15 to 19 years was 31.1 per 1000 individuals, compared with 18.6 for White adolescents. AI/AN youths report earlier onset of sexual activity and greater numbers of sexual partners than do youths in general. In 2011, among all races and ethnicities, AI/ANs had the second highest rates of chlamydia and gonorrhea and the third highest rates of primary and secondary syphilis. From 2011 through 2014, the US Department of Health and Human Services’ Family and Youth Services Bureau, through the Tribal Personal Responsibility Education Program (Tribal PREP), funded 14 tribes and tribal organizations to select, adapt, and implement culturally relevant, evidence-informed contraceptive and abstinence education curricula for their communities. Grantees also promoted successful transitions to adulthood by providing content on selected adulthood preparation subjects. Addressing these longstanding health inequities requires intervention and evaluation approaches that are culturally consonant with the tribal communities in which they will be used. An abundance of research emphasizes the importance of incorporating community-based participatory research approaches for culturally tailoring these interventions and evaluation methods. Drawing on this rich history, we extend the concept here by directly including the voices from front-line staff responsible for Tribal PREP program implementation as authors. Because there is little empirical research on evidence-based curricula and practices for AI/AN youths, the lessons learned by these program implementers offer firsthand experiences to further increase cultural awareness and improve future adolescent pregnancy prevention (APP) interventions for AI/AN adolescents, helping fill the gap in empirical research. (Author Introduction)

  • Individual Author: Hahn, Heather; Rohacek, Monica; Isaacs, Julia
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    Child care subsidies are critical for the well-being of low-income families, including parents’ economic success and children’s development. To inform state efforts to simplify access to child care subsidies and improve service delivery, this report highlights steps taken and lessons learned by five states that participated in the Work Support Strategies initiative between 2012 and 2015. These states worked to improve child care subsidy access and retention, efficiency of service delivery, quality of client service, and alignment with other benefit programs. The report also discusses the implications of these findings for implementation of the reauthorized Child Care and Development Fund. (Author abstract)

    Child care subsidies are critical for the well-being of low-income families, including parents’ economic success and children’s development. To inform state efforts to simplify access to child care subsidies and improve service delivery, this report highlights steps taken and lessons learned by five states that participated in the Work Support Strategies initiative between 2012 and 2015. These states worked to improve child care subsidy access and retention, efficiency of service delivery, quality of client service, and alignment with other benefit programs. The report also discusses the implications of these findings for implementation of the reauthorized Child Care and Development Fund. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Weigensberg, Elizabeth; Cornwell, Derekh; Leininger, Lindsey; Stagner, Matthew; LeBarron, Sarah; Gellar, Jonathan; MacIntyre, Sophie; Chapman, Richard; Maher, Erin J.; Pecora, Peter J.; O'Brien, Kirk
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    Mathematica and Casey Family Programs have published the final report from a project linking child welfare and Medicaid data to conduct analyses to understand types of high service use and to identify factors predictive of high service use among children in foster care. The study identifies distinct types of high service users and how both child welfare and Medicaid data can be used to predict which children may be likely to experience high degrees of placement instability. The study was conducted in partnership with partners in two states—Tennessee’s Department of Children’s Services and TennCare, and Florida’s Department of Children and Families, Agency for Health Care Administration, and Eckerd Kids. The goal of the project is to help child welfare, Medicaid and other service providing agencies better coordinate service delivery to prevent undesirable outcomes for children and to improve effectiveness and efficiency. (Author abstract) 

    Mathematica and Casey Family Programs have published the final report from a project linking child welfare and Medicaid data to conduct analyses to understand types of high service use and to identify factors predictive of high service use among children in foster care. The study identifies distinct types of high service users and how both child welfare and Medicaid data can be used to predict which children may be likely to experience high degrees of placement instability. The study was conducted in partnership with partners in two states—Tennessee’s Department of Children’s Services and TennCare, and Florida’s Department of Children and Families, Agency for Health Care Administration, and Eckerd Kids. The goal of the project is to help child welfare, Medicaid and other service providing agencies better coordinate service delivery to prevent undesirable outcomes for children and to improve effectiveness and efficiency. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Hulsey, Lara; Zief, Susan; Murphy, Lauren
    Reference Type: Report, Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2018

    Introduction

    This brief summarizes key characteristics of programs funded through the Personal Responsibility Education Program (PREP), which aims to reduce teen pregnancies, sexually transmitted infections, and associated risk behaviors. PREP is administered by the Family and Youth Services Bureau within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Funding is awarded to states and territories through formula grants (State PREP), and through a competitive process to tribes and tribal entities (Tribal PREP) and to direct service providers in states and territories that did not take State PREP funding (Competitive PREP).

    Purpose

    This brief is one in a series that will inform stakeholders and the public about the PREP program.

    Key Findings and Highlights

    More than 244,000 youth participated in the PREP program during the 2013–2014 and 2014–2015 reporting periods. Across the country, 3,545 facilitators served youth in 543 PREP programs...

    Introduction

    This brief summarizes key characteristics of programs funded through the Personal Responsibility Education Program (PREP), which aims to reduce teen pregnancies, sexually transmitted infections, and associated risk behaviors. PREP is administered by the Family and Youth Services Bureau within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Funding is awarded to states and territories through formula grants (State PREP), and through a competitive process to tribes and tribal entities (Tribal PREP) and to direct service providers in states and territories that did not take State PREP funding (Competitive PREP).

    Purpose

    This brief is one in a series that will inform stakeholders and the public about the PREP program.

    Key Findings and Highlights

    More than 244,000 youth participated in the PREP program during the 2013–2014 and 2014–2015 reporting periods. Across the country, 3,545 facilitators served youth in 543 PREP programs operated by 472 providers. The most common evidence-based program models implemented were Making Proud Choices!, Teen Outreach Program (TOP), Be Proud! Be Responsible!, and Reducing the Risk. The most common adulthood preparation subjects implemented were healthy relationships, healthy life skills, and adolescent development.

    Methods

    PREP grantees submit performance measures data to ACF each year. These findings are based on performance measures data submitted by State PREP, Tribal PREP, and Competitive PREP grantees for the 2013-2014 and 2014–2015 reporting periods. (Author introduction)

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