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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Gupta, Sonam; Srinivasan, Mithuna
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2017

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS Workshop discusses the mixed-methods evaluation of the Virginia Employment Through Entrepreneurship Consortium (VETEC) Program, a Workforce Innovation Fund initiative that provided technical assistance and training (between July 2012 to July 2017) to WIA-WIOA-eligible adults starting their own businesses.

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS Workshop discusses the mixed-methods evaluation of the Virginia Employment Through Entrepreneurship Consortium (VETEC) Program, a Workforce Innovation Fund initiative that provided technical assistance and training (between July 2012 to July 2017) to WIA-WIOA-eligible adults starting their own businesses.

  • Individual Author: Dastrup, Samuel; Burnett, Kimberly; Buron, Larry
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This document lays out a plan for the cost-benefit analyses (CBAs) that will be conducted for up to six of the nine Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE) programs. The Career Pathways Intermediate Outcomes (CPIO) study is evaluating the intermediate impacts and outcomes of the PACE programs. The CBAs cover the three-year period after study enrollment.

    The CBAs planned in this document will accompany and extend the related “what works” impact analyses of the CPIO study. This document will guide the estimation of the costs of providing the PACE programs and our comparison of these costs with gains in employment and self-sufficiency measured in the impact analyses.

    Findings from the CBAs—how program costs compare with observed benefits—will help policymakers assess whether to encourage continuation or potentially expansion of each program’s approach as part of national policy. (Author abtract)

    This document lays out a plan for the cost-benefit analyses (CBAs) that will be conducted for up to six of the nine Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE) programs. The Career Pathways Intermediate Outcomes (CPIO) study is evaluating the intermediate impacts and outcomes of the PACE programs. The CBAs cover the three-year period after study enrollment.

    The CBAs planned in this document will accompany and extend the related “what works” impact analyses of the CPIO study. This document will guide the estimation of the costs of providing the PACE programs and our comparison of these costs with gains in employment and self-sufficiency measured in the impact analyses.

    Findings from the CBAs—how program costs compare with observed benefits—will help policymakers assess whether to encourage continuation or potentially expansion of each program’s approach as part of national policy. (Author abtract)

  • Individual Author: Darling, Matthew; O'Leary, Christopher ; Perez-Johnson, Irma; Lefkowitz, Jaclyn; Kline, Ken; Damerow, Ben; Eberts, Randall; Amin, Samia ; Chojnacki, Greg
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This report presents findings from Mathematica’s behavioral insights study conducted for the U.S. Department of Labor’s Reemployment and Eligibility Assessment (REA) program in Michigan. This report presents our findings on the effects of emails designed to encourage UI claimants to (1) schedule and attend REA sessions with Michigan Works! Southwest and (2) persist in efforts that will help them succeed in their job search efforts following REA program completion. Key findings include:

    • Simple encouragement emails resulted in a 15 percentage point increase in Unemployment Insurance (UI) claimants scheduling their first REA session.
    • There was a 14 percentage point increase in the number of UI claimants completing the REA program. (Edited author abstract) 

    This report presents findings from Mathematica’s behavioral insights study conducted for the U.S. Department of Labor’s Reemployment and Eligibility Assessment (REA) program in Michigan. This report presents our findings on the effects of emails designed to encourage UI claimants to (1) schedule and attend REA sessions with Michigan Works! Southwest and (2) persist in efforts that will help them succeed in their job search efforts following REA program completion. Key findings include:

    • Simple encouragement emails resulted in a 15 percentage point increase in Unemployment Insurance (UI) claimants scheduling their first REA session.
    • There was a 14 percentage point increase in the number of UI claimants completing the REA program. (Edited author abstract) 
  • Individual Author: Lefkowitz, Jaclyn; Darling, Matthew; Chojnacki, Gregory ; Perez-Johnson, Irma ; Amin, Samia; Manley, Mikia
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    The U.S. Department of Labor’s (DOL) Behavioral Interventions (DOL-BI) project adds to a growing body of evidence indicating that relatively small changes in how programs operate can lead to striking improvements in their performance. In three trials that tested applications of behavioral science, the project team found substantial benefits for three DOL programs. We have published detailed technical reports on the design and findings of each trial. This brief focuses on the lessons learned by the team as it identified opportunities for behavioral trials and implemented each one. The three trials differed from one another in terms of scope and program focus, demonstrating the broad applicability of behavioral interventions. And although the trials were implemented in labor programs, the findings have potential implications for the use of behavioral interventions in programs funded by other agencies as well. (Author abstract) 

    The U.S. Department of Labor’s (DOL) Behavioral Interventions (DOL-BI) project adds to a growing body of evidence indicating that relatively small changes in how programs operate can lead to striking improvements in their performance. In three trials that tested applications of behavioral science, the project team found substantial benefits for three DOL programs. We have published detailed technical reports on the design and findings of each trial. This brief focuses on the lessons learned by the team as it identified opportunities for behavioral trials and implemented each one. The three trials differed from one another in terms of scope and program focus, demonstrating the broad applicability of behavioral interventions. And although the trials were implemented in labor programs, the findings have potential implications for the use of behavioral interventions in programs funded by other agencies as well. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Navarro, David; van Dok, Mark ; Hendra, Richard
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2007

    Although much is known about how to help welfare recipients find jobs, little is known about how to help them and other low-wage workers keep jobs or advance in the labor market. This report presents an assessment of the implementation and effects at the two-year follow-up point of a program in Riverside County, California, that aimed to promote job retention and advancement among employed individuals who recently left the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program, the cash welfare program that mainly serves single mothers and their children. The study is part of the Employment Retention and Advancement (ERA) project, which is testing 15 programs across the country (including two programs in Riverside). The ERA project is being conducted by MDRC, under contract to the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, with additional funding from the U.S. Department of Labor.

    This ERA intervention in Riverside County, called the Post-Assistance Self-Sufficiency (PASS) program, was designed to provide former TANF...

    Although much is known about how to help welfare recipients find jobs, little is known about how to help them and other low-wage workers keep jobs or advance in the labor market. This report presents an assessment of the implementation and effects at the two-year follow-up point of a program in Riverside County, California, that aimed to promote job retention and advancement among employed individuals who recently left the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program, the cash welfare program that mainly serves single mothers and their children. The study is part of the Employment Retention and Advancement (ERA) project, which is testing 15 programs across the country (including two programs in Riverside). The ERA project is being conducted by MDRC, under contract to the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, with additional funding from the U.S. Department of Labor.

    This ERA intervention in Riverside County, called the Post-Assistance Self-Sufficiency (PASS) program, was designed to provide former TANF recipients with voluntary postemployment services — such as case management, counseling and mentoring, and help with reemployment — to help them keep their jobs, remain off TANF, and advance their earning potential. PASS is being evaluated using a random assignment research design whereby eligible individuals were assigned, through a lottery-like process, either to a program group, whose members were actively recruited by one of five local PASS service providers to engage in an array of postemployment services, or to a control group, whose members were eligible to receive less intensive postemployment services from the Riverside Department of Public Social Services (DPSS), if they requested such services from DPSS. The outcomes for the control group represent what would have happened in the absence of the PASS program, providing a benchmark against which to compare the PASS program. (Author abstract)

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