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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Miller, Cynthia; Schultz, Caroline; Bernardi, Alexandra
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    Despite this broad support, an EITC expansion for adults without children has yet to become policy in today’s environment of budget ceilings and efforts to rein in spending. The Paycheck Plus study will inform this debate by presenting evidence on the effects of this type of policy on low-wage workers’ income and earnings. This brief, the second in a series, provides an update on the project, describing the implementation of the bonus during the first year and receipt rates during the 2015 tax season. The brief also discusses the forthcoming test of Paycheck Plus in Atlanta, Georgia, which will provide evidence of its effects in a different context from New York City. (Edited author introduction)

    Despite this broad support, an EITC expansion for adults without children has yet to become policy in today’s environment of budget ceilings and efforts to rein in spending. The Paycheck Plus study will inform this debate by presenting evidence on the effects of this type of policy on low-wage workers’ income and earnings. This brief, the second in a series, provides an update on the project, describing the implementation of the bonus during the first year and receipt rates during the 2015 tax season. The brief also discusses the forthcoming test of Paycheck Plus in Atlanta, Georgia, which will provide evidence of its effects in a different context from New York City. (Edited author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Miller, Cynthia; Mincy, Ronald; Sorrensen, Elaine; Turetsky, Vicki; Hicks, Carson
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2014

    This session will explore the emerging research on an expanded Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) for single adults. The EITC, a refundable tax credit for low- to moderate-income working individuals and couples, is an effective way to make work pay for low-wage workers. However, many childless adults are ineligible for benefits. This session will explore emerging evidence on how expanding the EITC may improve self-sufficiency for low-income, single adults, including non-custodial parents. Carson Hicks (New York City Center for Economic Opportunity) will moderate this session, and Vicki Turetsky (Administration for Children and Families) will serve as a discussant.

    • Paycheck Plus: Testing an Expanded EITC for Single Adults in New York City

    Cynthia Miller (MDRC)

    • Effects of an Expanded EITC on Labor Market Participation for Black and Latino Young Men

    Ronald Mincy (Columbia University)

    • Strengthening Families with Non-Custodial Parents: Effects of an Expanded EITC on Child Support

    Elaine Sorensen (Administration for Children and Families) (...

    This session will explore the emerging research on an expanded Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) for single adults. The EITC, a refundable tax credit for low- to moderate-income working individuals and couples, is an effective way to make work pay for low-wage workers. However, many childless adults are ineligible for benefits. This session will explore emerging evidence on how expanding the EITC may improve self-sufficiency for low-income, single adults, including non-custodial parents. Carson Hicks (New York City Center for Economic Opportunity) will moderate this session, and Vicki Turetsky (Administration for Children and Families) will serve as a discussant.

    • Paycheck Plus: Testing an Expanded EITC for Single Adults in New York City

    Cynthia Miller (MDRC)

    • Effects of an Expanded EITC on Labor Market Participation for Black and Latino Young Men

    Ronald Mincy (Columbia University)

    • Strengthening Families with Non-Custodial Parents: Effects of an Expanded EITC on Child Support

    Elaine Sorensen (Administration for Children and Families) (conference program description)

    These presentations were given at the 2014 Welfare Research and Evaluation Conference (WREC).

  • Individual Author: NYC Center for Economic Opportunity
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    Offered nationally for the first time in 2011, SaveUSA is a tax time matched savings program designed to encourage short-term savings among tax filers with low to moderate incomes. This brief documents Year 1 of the program, with a focus on key implementation lessons for policymakers, advocates, and funders to highlight tax time savings in their work and provide a framework for further replication. (author abstract)

    Offered nationally for the first time in 2011, SaveUSA is a tax time matched savings program designed to encourage short-term savings among tax filers with low to moderate incomes. This brief documents Year 1 of the program, with a focus on key implementation lessons for policymakers, advocates, and funders to highlight tax time savings in their work and provide a framework for further replication. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Sorensen, Elaine
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2010

    In 2006, New York became the first state to enact a new earned income tax credit for low-income parents who pay their child support in full. The credit is designed to keep parents from falling too deeply into poverty if they pay their child support in full and to encourage low-income noncustodial parents to work and pay their child support. During its first year, only 5,280 noncustodial parents received the tax credit, costing just over $2 million. This report identifies three reasons the take-up rate was so low and offers recommendations on how to increase participation in the future. (author abstract)

    In 2006, New York became the first state to enact a new earned income tax credit for low-income parents who pay their child support in full. The credit is designed to keep parents from falling too deeply into poverty if they pay their child support in full and to encourage low-income noncustodial parents to work and pay their child support. During its first year, only 5,280 noncustodial parents received the tax credit, costing just over $2 million. This report identifies three reasons the take-up rate was so low and offers recommendations on how to increase participation in the future. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Wertheim, Tiana; Flacke, Tim
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2006

    In 2003, a coalition of public, private, and not-for-profit actors in San Francisco began work to create a local city/county supplement to the federal Earned Income Tax Credit. In addition to putting more money in the pockets of working families living in a high-cost city, the coalition sought to use the program to boost participation by eligible recipients in the federal EITC and to help low-income families connect to financial services and asset-building opportunities. This paper tells the story of San Francisco's Working Families Credit—now in its second year—explaining how the program worked in its first year of operation, summarizing program outcomes and outputs thus far, and describing lessons learned and best practices for those considering developing a similar program in their own local jurisdictions. (author abstract)

    In 2003, a coalition of public, private, and not-for-profit actors in San Francisco began work to create a local city/county supplement to the federal Earned Income Tax Credit. In addition to putting more money in the pockets of working families living in a high-cost city, the coalition sought to use the program to boost participation by eligible recipients in the federal EITC and to help low-income families connect to financial services and asset-building opportunities. This paper tells the story of San Francisco's Working Families Credit—now in its second year—explaining how the program worked in its first year of operation, summarizing program outcomes and outputs thus far, and describing lessons learned and best practices for those considering developing a similar program in their own local jurisdictions. (author abstract)

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