Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Cities for Financial Empowerment Fund
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This report is a three-year evaluation of the Financial Empowerment Center initiative's replication in 5 cities (Denver, CO; Lansing, MI; Nashville, TN; Philadelphia, PA and San Antonio, TX). Financial Empowerment Centers (FECs) offer professional, one-on-one financial counseling as a free public service. The evaluation draws on data from 22,000 clients who participated in 57,000 counseling sessions across these first 5 city replication partners, and provides additional evidence of the program's success. (Author introduction)

    This report is a three-year evaluation of the Financial Empowerment Center initiative's replication in 5 cities (Denver, CO; Lansing, MI; Nashville, TN; Philadelphia, PA and San Antonio, TX). Financial Empowerment Centers (FECs) offer professional, one-on-one financial counseling as a free public service. The evaluation draws on data from 22,000 clients who participated in 57,000 counseling sessions across these first 5 city replication partners, and provides additional evidence of the program's success. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Mills, Gregory; Pergamit, Michael; McKerman, Signe-Mary; Braga, Breno; Ratcliffe, Caroline; Hahn, Heather; Edelstein, Sara; Elkin, Sam
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    This report presents first-year findings from an evaluation of the Assets for Independence (AFI) program at two sites — Central New Mexico Community College in Albuquerque, NM and RISE Financial Pathways in Los Angeles, CA.

    Findings show that the AFI program increased low-income participants’ savings after one year. There is also evidence of a range of several beneficial secondary impacts, including reductions in material hardship and improvements in perceived financial well-being.

    This is the first evaluation of the AFI program to use a randomized controlled trial. The study assesses the program’s early effects on participants’ savings, asset ownership, and economic well-being. (Author abstract)

    This report presents first-year findings from an evaluation of the Assets for Independence (AFI) program at two sites — Central New Mexico Community College in Albuquerque, NM and RISE Financial Pathways in Los Angeles, CA.

    Findings show that the AFI program increased low-income participants’ savings after one year. There is also evidence of a range of several beneficial secondary impacts, including reductions in material hardship and improvements in perceived financial well-being.

    This is the first evaluation of the AFI program to use a randomized controlled trial. The study assesses the program’s early effects on participants’ savings, asset ownership, and economic well-being. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Dechausay, Nadine; Miller, Cynthia; Quiroz-Becerra, Victoria
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    In 2007, New York City launched the first test of a conditional cash transfer program in the United States. Called Family Rewards, the program sought to break the intergenerational cycle of poverty by offering cash assistance to poor families to reduce immediate hardship, but conditioned this assistance on families’ efforts to improve their health, further their children’s education, and increase parents’ work and earnings, in the hope of reducing poverty over the long term. The program had positive effects on some outcomes, but left others unchanged. Building on the lessons learned from that evaluation led to the next iteration and test of the model — called Family Rewards 2.0, the subject of this report.

    Family Rewards 2.0 was launched in July 2011 in the Bronx, New York and Memphis, Tennessee. While still offering rewards in the areas of children’s education, family health, and parents’ work, Family Rewards 2.0 has fewer rewards in each domain, offers the education rewards only to high school students, makes the rewards more timely by paying them each month, and...

    In 2007, New York City launched the first test of a conditional cash transfer program in the United States. Called Family Rewards, the program sought to break the intergenerational cycle of poverty by offering cash assistance to poor families to reduce immediate hardship, but conditioned this assistance on families’ efforts to improve their health, further their children’s education, and increase parents’ work and earnings, in the hope of reducing poverty over the long term. The program had positive effects on some outcomes, but left others unchanged. Building on the lessons learned from that evaluation led to the next iteration and test of the model — called Family Rewards 2.0, the subject of this report.

    Family Rewards 2.0 was launched in July 2011 in the Bronx, New York and Memphis, Tennessee. While still offering rewards in the areas of children’s education, family health, and parents’ work, Family Rewards 2.0 has fewer rewards in each domain, offers the education rewards only to high school students, makes the rewards more timely by paying them each month, and includes family guidance. The addition of guidance, or having staff members actively help families develop strategies to earn rewards, represents the biggest change to the original model.

    MDRC is evaluating the program through a randomized controlled trial involving approximately 1,200 families in each city, half of whom can receive the cash rewards if they meet the required conditions, and half of whom have been assigned to a control group that cannot receive the rewards. This report presents early findings on the program’s implementation and families’ receipt of rewards during the first two years. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Glosser, Asaph
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2014

    The presentation describes the Building Assets for Fathers and Families (BAFF) initiative as implemented in Washington, including program design and participant characteristics and outcomes. BAFF offers case management and asset building services to low-income non-custodial fathers to increase financial stability, asset ownership, and ability to meet child support obligations.

    This presentation was given at the 2014 National Association of Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Annual Workshop.

    The presentation describes the Building Assets for Fathers and Families (BAFF) initiative as implemented in Washington, including program design and participant characteristics and outcomes. BAFF offers case management and asset building services to low-income non-custodial fathers to increase financial stability, asset ownership, and ability to meet child support obligations.

    This presentation was given at the 2014 National Association of Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Annual Workshop.

  • Individual Author: Klein, Joyce; Gomez, Luz; Edgcomb, Elaine
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    In early 2014, FIELD released the first findings from the ABC pilot. The publication examines the experiences of the five participating sites during the year-long pilot period. Drawing from their experiences, the paper provides insights for organizations, coaches and financial institutions about the ideal customer profile, card approval rates, the demographic and credit profiles of cardholders at the time of application and preliminary findings on credit score outcomes. (Author abstract)

    In early 2014, FIELD released the first findings from the ABC pilot. The publication examines the experiences of the five participating sites during the year-long pilot period. Drawing from their experiences, the paper provides insights for organizations, coaches and financial institutions about the ideal customer profile, card approval rates, the demographic and credit profiles of cardholders at the time of application and preliminary findings on credit score outcomes. (Author abstract)

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 2001 to 2017

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations