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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: King Bowes, Kendra; Burrus, Barri B.; Axelson, Sarah; Garrido, Milagros; Kimbriel, Adriana ; Abramson, Lisa; Gorman, Gwenda; Dancer, Angela; White, Terrill; Beaudry, PJ
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2018

    Systemic inequities, including a lack of culturally appropriate sexual health education, put American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) adolescents at higher-than-average risk for adverse sexual and reproductive health outcomes. For example, in 2013, the birth rate among AI/AN adolescents aged 15 to 19 years was 31.1 per 1000 individuals, compared with 18.6 for White adolescents. AI/AN youths report earlier onset of sexual activity and greater numbers of sexual partners than do youths in general. In 2011, among all races and ethnicities, AI/ANs had the second highest rates of chlamydia and gonorrhea and the third highest rates of primary and secondary syphilis. From 2011 through 2014, the US Department of Health and Human Services’ Family and Youth Services Bureau, through the Tribal Personal Responsibility Education Program (Tribal PREP), funded 14 tribes and tribal organizations to select, adapt, and implement culturally relevant, evidence-informed contraceptive and abstinence education curricula for their communities. Grantees also promoted successful transitions to adulthood...

    Systemic inequities, including a lack of culturally appropriate sexual health education, put American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) adolescents at higher-than-average risk for adverse sexual and reproductive health outcomes. For example, in 2013, the birth rate among AI/AN adolescents aged 15 to 19 years was 31.1 per 1000 individuals, compared with 18.6 for White adolescents. AI/AN youths report earlier onset of sexual activity and greater numbers of sexual partners than do youths in general. In 2011, among all races and ethnicities, AI/ANs had the second highest rates of chlamydia and gonorrhea and the third highest rates of primary and secondary syphilis. From 2011 through 2014, the US Department of Health and Human Services’ Family and Youth Services Bureau, through the Tribal Personal Responsibility Education Program (Tribal PREP), funded 14 tribes and tribal organizations to select, adapt, and implement culturally relevant, evidence-informed contraceptive and abstinence education curricula for their communities. Grantees also promoted successful transitions to adulthood by providing content on selected adulthood preparation subjects. Addressing these longstanding health inequities requires intervention and evaluation approaches that are culturally consonant with the tribal communities in which they will be used. An abundance of research emphasizes the importance of incorporating community-based participatory research approaches for culturally tailoring these interventions and evaluation methods. Drawing on this rich history, we extend the concept here by directly including the voices from front-line staff responsible for Tribal PREP program implementation as authors. Because there is little empirical research on evidence-based curricula and practices for AI/AN youths, the lessons learned by these program implementers offer firsthand experiences to further increase cultural awareness and improve future adolescent pregnancy prevention (APP) interventions for AI/AN adolescents, helping fill the gap in empirical research. (Author Introduction)

  • Individual Author: Martinson, Karin; Copson, Elizabeth; Gardiner, Karen; Kitrosser, Daniel
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    This report documents the implementation and early impacts of the Carreras en Salud (Careers in Health) program, operated by Instituto del Progreso Latino, in Chicago, Illinois. The Carreras en Salud program is one promising effort aimed at helping low-income, low-skilled adults access and complete occupational training that can lead to increased employment and higher earnings. A distinctive feature of this program is its focus on training for low-income Latinos for employment in healthcare occupations, primarily Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) and Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN). It is among nine career pathways programs being evaluated in the Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE) study sponsored by the Administration for Children and Families. The Carreras en Salud program consists of five elements: (1) a structured healthcare training pathway, starting at low skill levels; (2) contextualized and accelerated basic skills and ESL instruction; (3) academic advising and non-academic supports; (4) financial assistance; and (5) employment services. Using a rigorous...

    This report documents the implementation and early impacts of the Carreras en Salud (Careers in Health) program, operated by Instituto del Progreso Latino, in Chicago, Illinois. The Carreras en Salud program is one promising effort aimed at helping low-income, low-skilled adults access and complete occupational training that can lead to increased employment and higher earnings. A distinctive feature of this program is its focus on training for low-income Latinos for employment in healthcare occupations, primarily Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) and Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN). It is among nine career pathways programs being evaluated in the Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE) study sponsored by the Administration for Children and Families. The Carreras en Salud program consists of five elements: (1) a structured healthcare training pathway, starting at low skill levels; (2) contextualized and accelerated basic skills and ESL instruction; (3) academic advising and non-academic supports; (4) financial assistance; and (5) employment services. Using a rigorous research design, the study found that the Carreras en Salud program increased hours of occupational training and basic skills instruction received and the attainment of education credentials within an 18-month follow-up period. The program also increased employment in the healthcare field and resulted in a reduction of participants reporting financial hardship. Future reports will examine whether these effects translate into gains in employment and earnings. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Wood, Robert G.; Goesling, Brian; Paulsell, Diane
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    The federal government has had a long-standing commitment to supporting healthy relationships and stable families. In the mid-1990s, Congress created the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) block grant, which had the formation and maintenance of two-parent families as one of its core purposes. TANF provided states with the funding and flexibility to support activities to promote healthy marriage. Beginning in the mid-2000s, the federal government began providing additional funding specifically to support healthy marriage and relationship education (HMRE) services. The Office of Family Assistance (OFA) in the Administration for Children & Families (ACF), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services oversees these funds and distributes them through a set of competitive multi-year grants to organizations nationwide. OFA made the most recent round of HMRE grant awards in September 2015. These grants support HMRE services for a mix of populations, including youth in high school, individual adults, and adult couples. (Author abstract) 

    The federal government has had a long-standing commitment to supporting healthy relationships and stable families. In the mid-1990s, Congress created the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) block grant, which had the formation and maintenance of two-parent families as one of its core purposes. TANF provided states with the funding and flexibility to support activities to promote healthy marriage. Beginning in the mid-2000s, the federal government began providing additional funding specifically to support healthy marriage and relationship education (HMRE) services. The Office of Family Assistance (OFA) in the Administration for Children & Families (ACF), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services oversees these funds and distributes them through a set of competitive multi-year grants to organizations nationwide. OFA made the most recent round of HMRE grant awards in September 2015. These grants support HMRE services for a mix of populations, including youth in high school, individual adults, and adult couples. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Gutierrez, Ivette
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    The LEAP grants sought to create a stronger linkage between pre- and post-release employment services for justice-involved individuals. Case management—coordinating services for and working directly with clients—is an important aspect of that linkage. In the LEAP sites, interactions with case managers played a role in shaping participants’ experiences with employment services in the jail, and their engagement. This brief explores the different models used to deliver case management through jail-based AJCs and community-based AJCs and service providers, the benefits and drawbacks of those models, and strategies used to help establish continuity of services after release. (Author introduction)

     

    The LEAP grants sought to create a stronger linkage between pre- and post-release employment services for justice-involved individuals. Case management—coordinating services for and working directly with clients—is an important aspect of that linkage. In the LEAP sites, interactions with case managers played a role in shaping participants’ experiences with employment services in the jail, and their engagement. This brief explores the different models used to deliver case management through jail-based AJCs and community-based AJCs and service providers, the benefits and drawbacks of those models, and strategies used to help establish continuity of services after release. (Author introduction)

     

  • Individual Author: Anzelone, Caitlin; Timm, Jonathan; Kusayeva, Yana
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    State child support programs secure financial support for children whose parents live apart. These programs establish paternity, set orders for the amounts parents are required to pay, and collect and distribute payments. An essential step in the process of establishing paternity and setting an order of support is delivering legal documents to the person named as a parent (frequently referred to as the “noncustodial parent”). This step of delivering documents is known as “service.” A noncustodial parent typically receives a summons that says he or she has been named as the parent of a particular child, provides notice that a legal proceeding has been initiated, and sets a hearing date. The summons is usually delivered by certified mail or by a law enforcement officer. In many states, noncustodial parents can waive being served by accepting the legal documents in the child support office voluntarily, but few do. A person who comes into the child support office to accept service voluntarily is actively engaging in the child support process. In doing so, the person benefits from...

    State child support programs secure financial support for children whose parents live apart. These programs establish paternity, set orders for the amounts parents are required to pay, and collect and distribute payments. An essential step in the process of establishing paternity and setting an order of support is delivering legal documents to the person named as a parent (frequently referred to as the “noncustodial parent”). This step of delivering documents is known as “service.” A noncustodial parent typically receives a summons that says he or she has been named as the parent of a particular child, provides notice that a legal proceeding has been initiated, and sets a hearing date. The summons is usually delivered by certified mail or by a law enforcement officer. In many states, noncustodial parents can waive being served by accepting the legal documents in the child support office voluntarily, but few do. A person who comes into the child support office to accept service voluntarily is actively engaging in the child support process. In doing so, the person benefits from reduced fees, a greater voice in the legal process, and a better understanding of the way an order is established. The child support program benefits from increased efficiency, reduced costs, and the ability to provide more information to parents. With these benefits in mind, the BICS team worked with the Georgia Division of Child Support Services (DCSS) to test a new form of outreach intended to get more people to accept service voluntarily. The intervention encouraged people who had been named as parents to come into the office and meet with staff members to discuss the child support process and their obligations. Using insights from behavioral science, the BICS team redesigned mailed materials and changed the nature of the initial meeting between noncustodial parents and child support staff members in an attempt to simplify the process and encourage parents to act. (Excerpt from overview)

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