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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Reid, Megan; Bellamy, Jennifer L.; Hawkins, Alan J.; Manno, Michelle S.
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    There is a growing interest in policies and programs that assist low-income fathers to stay involved with their children. Numerous programs have been developed to serve low-income fathers and their families, yet few of these programs have been rigorously evaluated. This panel examined the interventions and findings for a selection of rigorous evaluations to determine program effects. Megan Reid (Administration for Children and Families) moderated this session. (author introduction)

    There is a growing interest in policies and programs that assist low-income fathers to stay involved with their children. Numerous programs have been developed to serve low-income fathers and their families, yet few of these programs have been rigorously evaluated. This panel examined the interventions and findings for a selection of rigorous evaluations to determine program effects. Megan Reid (Administration for Children and Families) moderated this session. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Fontaine, Jocelyn ; Cramer, Lindsey ; Kurs, Emma ; Paddock, Ellen ; Eisenstat, Josh ; Levy, Jeremy; Hussemann, Jeanette
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    The evaluation of the Community-Centered Responsible Fatherhood Ex-Prisoner Reentry Pilot Projects (“Fatherhood Reentry”) documented the implementation of six programs designed to help stabilize fathers and their families, help move fathers toward economic self-sufficiency, and reduce recidivism. This report presents the findings from the evaluation and provides an overview of the activities implemented by the programs, describes their various approaches to implementation, and identifies the implementation challenges they faced and the solutions they used to overcome those challenges. We conclude with recommendations for practitioners and funders looking to fund, design, and implement similar family-focused programs. (Author introduction) 

    The evaluation of the Community-Centered Responsible Fatherhood Ex-Prisoner Reentry Pilot Projects (“Fatherhood Reentry”) documented the implementation of six programs designed to help stabilize fathers and their families, help move fathers toward economic self-sufficiency, and reduce recidivism. This report presents the findings from the evaluation and provides an overview of the activities implemented by the programs, describes their various approaches to implementation, and identifies the implementation challenges they faced and the solutions they used to overcome those challenges. We conclude with recommendations for practitioners and funders looking to fund, design, and implement similar family-focused programs. (Author introduction) 

  • Individual Author: Murray, Desiree W.; Rosanbalm, Kate; Christopoulos, Christina
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    This report is the fourth and final in a series on Self-Regulation and Toxic Stress; it is targeted specifically towards program administrators and practitioners. This report reviews the key concepts for understanding self-regulation, including the relationship between stress and self-regulation. Additionally, it summarizes principal findings from a comprehensive review of self-regulation interventions. Finally and most importantly, it addresses how current theory and knowledge of self-regulation may apply to programs and practitioners serving children and youth in different developmental groups from birth through young adulthood.

    Key conclusions from the report indicate that:

    • A variety of self-regulation interventions result in meaningful positive effects on cognitive, emotional, and behavioral self-regulation, as well as broader outcomes across development in functional domains like mental health and academic achievement.
    • Many promising intervention approaches exist for supporting self-regulation development that could be incorporated into existing...

    This report is the fourth and final in a series on Self-Regulation and Toxic Stress; it is targeted specifically towards program administrators and practitioners. This report reviews the key concepts for understanding self-regulation, including the relationship between stress and self-regulation. Additionally, it summarizes principal findings from a comprehensive review of self-regulation interventions. Finally and most importantly, it addresses how current theory and knowledge of self-regulation may apply to programs and practitioners serving children and youth in different developmental groups from birth through young adulthood.

    Key conclusions from the report indicate that:

    • A variety of self-regulation interventions result in meaningful positive effects on cognitive, emotional, and behavioral self-regulation, as well as broader outcomes across development in functional domains like mental health and academic achievement.
    • Many promising intervention approaches exist for supporting self-regulation development that could be incorporated into existing ACF programs.
    • Care is needed in selecting interventions that may be a good “fit” for relevant populations and settings.
    • Given the profound impacts that self-regulation can have across areas of functioning into adulthood, a self-regulation framework to support the well-being of children and families living in adversity may have great value. (Author abstract)
  • Individual Author: Vandevire, Sharon; Malm, Karin
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    One factor that may facilitate a successful reunification of children in foster care with their parents—or failing that, provide an alternate route to permanency through adoption or guardianship—is children’s connections with extended family. However, because foster care frequently disrupts social connections, practitioners may need to take extra steps to help children maintain or re-establish these connections. The Family Finding model provides child welfare practitioners with intensive search and engagement techniques to identify family members and other adults close to a child in foster care, and to involve these adults in developing and carrying out a plan for the emotional and legal permanency of the child. This report reviews the results from 13 evaluations of Family Finding that have been released over the past two years. (author abstract)

    One factor that may facilitate a successful reunification of children in foster care with their parents—or failing that, provide an alternate route to permanency through adoption or guardianship—is children’s connections with extended family. However, because foster care frequently disrupts social connections, practitioners may need to take extra steps to help children maintain or re-establish these connections. The Family Finding model provides child welfare practitioners with intensive search and engagement techniques to identify family members and other adults close to a child in foster care, and to involve these adults in developing and carrying out a plan for the emotional and legal permanency of the child. This report reviews the results from 13 evaluations of Family Finding that have been released over the past two years. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: McDonald, Erin; Eyster, Lauren; Nightingale, Demetra; Bovbjerg, Randall
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    This paper provides a review of formal research reports and published literature on implementation analysis. It defines implementation analysis, summarizing methodological issues and topics addressed by this type of analysis, and describes systems change analysis and its relationship to implementation analysis. The paper concludes with a summary of implications for the Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) National Implementation Evaluation design. The paper was developed as part of the HPOG Implementation, Systems and Outcome Project, which is being led by Abt Associates in partnership with the Urban Institute. (author abstract)

     

    This paper provides a review of formal research reports and published literature on implementation analysis. It defines implementation analysis, summarizing methodological issues and topics addressed by this type of analysis, and describes systems change analysis and its relationship to implementation analysis. The paper concludes with a summary of implications for the Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) National Implementation Evaluation design. The paper was developed as part of the HPOG Implementation, Systems and Outcome Project, which is being led by Abt Associates in partnership with the Urban Institute. (author abstract)

     

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