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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Derr, Michelle; McCay, Jonathan; Person, Ann
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2019

    The Learn, Innovate, Improve (or LI2) process is an approach that practitioners might use as part of the change and continuous quality improvement process. LI2 was developed by Mathematica Policy Research in partnership with the Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE) within the Administration for Children and Families and Harvard University’s Center on the Developing Child. LI2 is distinct from other change management strategies in its explicit emphasis on: (1) close collaboration between researchers and practitioners for sustainable change, (2) embedding evidence and analytic approaches at every stage, (3) capacity building of state and local human services agencies to self-administer the improvement process, and (4) knowledge building for the program and the field. This practice brief focuses on the second phase of the process—Innovate—which is intended to help both researchers of human services programs and the professionals who administer programs to generate new and innovative ideas to address pressing challenges. (Author abstract)

    The Learn, Innovate, Improve (or LI2) process is an approach that practitioners might use as part of the change and continuous quality improvement process. LI2 was developed by Mathematica Policy Research in partnership with the Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE) within the Administration for Children and Families and Harvard University’s Center on the Developing Child. LI2 is distinct from other change management strategies in its explicit emphasis on: (1) close collaboration between researchers and practitioners for sustainable change, (2) embedding evidence and analytic approaches at every stage, (3) capacity building of state and local human services agencies to self-administer the improvement process, and (4) knowledge building for the program and the field. This practice brief focuses on the second phase of the process—Innovate—which is intended to help both researchers of human services programs and the professionals who administer programs to generate new and innovative ideas to address pressing challenges. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Blackwell, Wendy; Braswell, Kenneth; Doar, Robert; Klein Vogel, Lisa; Scott, Mindy
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    Can researchers and practitioners reverse the trend of low labor force participation among working-age men? This panel discussion highlighted a range of policy options, implementation findings from a study on employment services for noncustodial parents, and how the National Responsible Fatherhood Clearinghouse supports practitioners to develop workforce development activities in responsible fatherhood programs. Kenneth Braswell (Fathers Incorporated) moderated the session and Wendy Blackwell (Center for Urban Families) served as the discussant. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

    Can researchers and practitioners reverse the trend of low labor force participation among working-age men? This panel discussion highlighted a range of policy options, implementation findings from a study on employment services for noncustodial parents, and how the National Responsible Fatherhood Clearinghouse supports practitioners to develop workforce development activities in responsible fatherhood programs. Kenneth Braswell (Fathers Incorporated) moderated the session and Wendy Blackwell (Center for Urban Families) served as the discussant. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Irwin, Molly; Dinan, Kinsey; Klerman, Jacob A.; Martinson, Karin
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    This video and its accompanying presentation slides are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS).This panel considered recent developments in job search assistance programs. The first paper suggested several possible pathways for such programs and considers the available evidence for each pathway. The next two papers presented research findings and a practitioner perspective from an impact evaluation of two different approaches to providing job search to cash assistance applicants in New York City. Molly Irwin moderated the panel (U.S. Department of Labor). Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction) 

    This video and its accompanying presentation slides are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS).This panel considered recent developments in job search assistance programs. The first paper suggested several possible pathways for such programs and considers the available evidence for each pathway. The next two papers presented research findings and a practitioner perspective from an impact evaluation of two different approaches to providing job search to cash assistance applicants in New York City. Molly Irwin moderated the panel (U.S. Department of Labor). Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction) 

  • Individual Author: Fontaine, Jocelyn ; Kurs, Emma
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    With funding from the Office of Family Assistance (OFA), the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation contracted with the Urban Institute to conduct an implementation evaluation of OFA’s Community-Centered Responsible Fatherhood Ex-Prisoner Reentry Pilot Projects (“Fatherhood Reentry”). Six organizations were funded to implement a range of activities intended to help stabilize fathers and their families, help move fathers toward economic self sufficiency, and reduce recidivism. This brief, one of three in a series, focuses on the economic stability activities implemented by the projects. Economic stability was a core focus of the Fatherhood Reentry projects based on the extant literature highlighting formerly incarcerated people’s needs for assistance in achieving self-sufficiency to reach their reentry and family reunification goals. Incarceration is a risk factor for unemployment, and formerly incarcerated people have difficulty achieving economic stability for various reasons that encompass both personal challenges and systemic barriers. This brief provides a short overview...

    With funding from the Office of Family Assistance (OFA), the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation contracted with the Urban Institute to conduct an implementation evaluation of OFA’s Community-Centered Responsible Fatherhood Ex-Prisoner Reentry Pilot Projects (“Fatherhood Reentry”). Six organizations were funded to implement a range of activities intended to help stabilize fathers and their families, help move fathers toward economic self sufficiency, and reduce recidivism. This brief, one of three in a series, focuses on the economic stability activities implemented by the projects. Economic stability was a core focus of the Fatherhood Reentry projects based on the extant literature highlighting formerly incarcerated people’s needs for assistance in achieving self-sufficiency to reach their reentry and family reunification goals. Incarceration is a risk factor for unemployment, and formerly incarcerated people have difficulty achieving economic stability for various reasons that encompass both personal challenges and systemic barriers. This brief provides a short overview of this literature, highlighting the importance of economic stability activities for fathers who are incarcerated or were formerly incarcerated, the barriers people face upon their return to the community, and how employment is associated with better outcomes among returning people, their families, and the community. We then include descriptions of the activities the Fatherhood Reentry projects used to foster economic stability for participating fathers and their families. We conclude with recommendations, based on the experiences of the Fatherhood Reentry projects, for practitioners implementing economic stability activities for the reentry population. (Author introduction) 

  • Individual Author: Fontaine, Jocelyn; Eisenstat, Josh ; Cramer, Lindsey
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    The Fatherhood Reentry projects provided activities to fathers (and their families) in institutional settings as they were nearing release (“prerelease”) and in their offices located in the community (“postrelease”). All six projects provided services in multiple institutional settings: federal prisons (KISRA), state prisons (KISRA, LSS, NJDOC, PB&J, RIDGE, and Rubicon), county/regional jails (KISRA, PB&J, RIDGE, and Rubicon), and residential substance abuse treatment facilities (Rubicon). All projects provided services in their community-based offices for participants served by the program prerelease. This brief, one of three in a series, focuses on the projects’ efforts to support the marital, romantic, and/or coparenting relationships of program participants. In addition to serving fathers, the Fatherhood Reentry projects included several activities to strengthen the relationships between fathers and their partners/coparents and to encourage coparenting and family reunification. This brief first provides a review of the literature on the importance of strengthening...

    The Fatherhood Reentry projects provided activities to fathers (and their families) in institutional settings as they were nearing release (“prerelease”) and in their offices located in the community (“postrelease”). All six projects provided services in multiple institutional settings: federal prisons (KISRA), state prisons (KISRA, LSS, NJDOC, PB&J, RIDGE, and Rubicon), county/regional jails (KISRA, PB&J, RIDGE, and Rubicon), and residential substance abuse treatment facilities (Rubicon). All projects provided services in their community-based offices for participants served by the program prerelease. This brief, one of three in a series, focuses on the projects’ efforts to support the marital, romantic, and/or coparenting relationships of program participants. In addition to serving fathers, the Fatherhood Reentry projects included several activities to strengthen the relationships between fathers and their partners/coparents and to encourage coparenting and family reunification. This brief first provides a review of the literature on the importance of strengthening such relationships for fathers who are incarcerated or were formerly incarcerated. This brief then describes the healthy relationship activities provided by the Fatherhood Reentry programs in detail. A conclusion section includes recommendations intended for practitioners implementing family-focused programming for fathers impacted by incarceration and their partners/coparents based on the experiences of the Fatherhood Reentry projects. (Author introduction) 

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