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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Denny-Brown, Noelle; Livermore, Gina; Shenk, Marisa; Morris, Eric
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    The SourceAmerica Pathways to Careers™ (Pathways) initiative relies upon state-of-the-art employment strategies to enable people with significant disabilities to have an informed choice of competitive, integrated, full-wage employment options that match their individual skills, interests, and abilities. In this report, we document the activities of the pilot Pathways project in Utah and the experiences of participants from the time this pilot project launched in May 2012 through December 2016, the fourth full year of implementation. During that time, the project enrolled 91 participants. This is the third of four primary reports that will describe the findings of the Pathways evaluation. The evaluation findings presented in this report are based on information collected from the project management information system; participant applications and follow-up surveys conducted 12 and 24 months after intake; and in-person interviews with staff and employers participating in the pilot Pathways project in Utah. We also analyzed project cost information and data on how Pathways staff in...

    The SourceAmerica Pathways to Careers™ (Pathways) initiative relies upon state-of-the-art employment strategies to enable people with significant disabilities to have an informed choice of competitive, integrated, full-wage employment options that match their individual skills, interests, and abilities. In this report, we document the activities of the pilot Pathways project in Utah and the experiences of participants from the time this pilot project launched in May 2012 through December 2016, the fourth full year of implementation. During that time, the project enrolled 91 participants. This is the third of four primary reports that will describe the findings of the Pathways evaluation. The evaluation findings presented in this report are based on information collected from the project management information system; participant applications and follow-up surveys conducted 12 and 24 months after intake; and in-person interviews with staff and employers participating in the pilot Pathways project in Utah. We also analyzed project cost information and data on how Pathways staff in the pilot project spend their time across various Pathways and non-Pathways activities. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Sacks, Vanessa; McGill, Brittany; Seefeldt, Kristin; Clum, Kim
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2016

    This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency contains a breakout session focusing on disconnected families--those in which adults are neither working nor receiving cash assistance. Panelists discussed the characteristics and circumstances of these families and barriers they face to self-sufficiency.

    This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency contains a breakout session focusing on disconnected families--those in which adults are neither working nor receiving cash assistance. Panelists discussed the characteristics and circumstances of these families and barriers they face to self-sufficiency.

  • Individual Author: Schroeder, Daniel; Patnaik, Ashweeta
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    In 1995 the Texas Legislature authorized the Office of the Attorney General (OAG) to improve child support services statewide through the creation of an Integrated Child Support System (ICSS) wherein the OAG may provide IV-D child support enforcement services under contract with counties that elect to participate in the system. The OAG sought and was granted a waiver from the Federal Office of Child Support Enforcement (OCSE) of the requirement for a written application for IV-D services in participating ICSS counties. The waiver was renewed several times, but with the last approval the OAG was required to have the program independently evaluated. The OAG contracted with the Ray Marshall Center for the Study of Human Resources (RMC) to design and conduct an evaluation to measure the impacts of ICSS, the results of which are included in this final report.  The Ray Marshall Center conducted the ICSS waiver evaluation using a combination of random assignment and composite pre-post evaluation designs to measure the impacts of the waiver at the county level. The evaluation relied...

    In 1995 the Texas Legislature authorized the Office of the Attorney General (OAG) to improve child support services statewide through the creation of an Integrated Child Support System (ICSS) wherein the OAG may provide IV-D child support enforcement services under contract with counties that elect to participate in the system. The OAG sought and was granted a waiver from the Federal Office of Child Support Enforcement (OCSE) of the requirement for a written application for IV-D services in participating ICSS counties. The waiver was renewed several times, but with the last approval the OAG was required to have the program independently evaluated. The OAG contracted with the Ray Marshall Center for the Study of Human Resources (RMC) to design and conduct an evaluation to measure the impacts of ICSS, the results of which are included in this final report.  The Ray Marshall Center conducted the ICSS waiver evaluation using a combination of random assignment and composite pre-post evaluation designs to measure the impacts of the waiver at the county level. The evaluation relied primarily on OAG administrative records data, Unemployment Insurance (UI) wage records, public assistance administrative records data, U.S. Bureau of the Census data, and other sources. These were used for estimating net impacts and for identifying relevant factors that may influence or be associated with the observed impacts. A process study provided a sufficient understanding of the structure and functioning of ICSS as implemented in order to accurately estimate the impacts of the waiver. The key research question for the impact analysis was: What effect did the ICSS waiver have on the collection and enforcement of child support in areas in which it was implemented? (Excerpt from author executive summary)

  • Individual Author: Dunham, Kate; Betesh, Hannah
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2015

    With a growing need for a more skilled workforce, providing effective and efficient employment and training services is an important national priority. We provide an overview of two of the largest initiatives seeking to provide these services in the United States: the Adult and Dislocated Worker programs. The programs provide similar services—including information on job search and high-demand occupations, assistance from employment counselors, and funding for training—and differ mainly in whether they focus on low-income individuals or workers who have become unemployed due to local economic conditions. We describe the programs as they operated under the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) of 1998 and how they evolved when the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) superseded WIA in 2015. (Author abstract)

    With a growing need for a more skilled workforce, providing effective and efficient employment and training services is an important national priority. We provide an overview of two of the largest initiatives seeking to provide these services in the United States: the Adult and Dislocated Worker programs. The programs provide similar services—including information on job search and high-demand occupations, assistance from employment counselors, and funding for training—and differ mainly in whether they focus on low-income individuals or workers who have become unemployed due to local economic conditions. We describe the programs as they operated under the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) of 1998 and how they evolved when the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) superseded WIA in 2015. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Osborne, Cynthia; Dillon, Amanda
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    Cases involving active duty military personnel and veteran families within the child support system are often more complex in nature than those of the general population. Some of the complications arise as a result of institutional barriers between the child support system and the military system. These complications are then compounded by the nature of a service member’s job such as multiple moves, pay changes, paternity establishment during deployment, multiple deployments, year-long absences, and physical and mental disabilities that result from military service. To provide specialized support for active duty service members and veterans’ child support and parenting time needs, the Texas Office of the Attorney General – Child Support Division (OAG-CSD) developed the Help Establishing Responsive Orders and Ensuring Support (HEROES) for Children in Military Families pilot program. The HEROES project is designed to provide enhanced, family-centered child support services with the objectives of increasing compliance with current child support obligations; ensuring accurate...

    Cases involving active duty military personnel and veteran families within the child support system are often more complex in nature than those of the general population. Some of the complications arise as a result of institutional barriers between the child support system and the military system. These complications are then compounded by the nature of a service member’s job such as multiple moves, pay changes, paternity establishment during deployment, multiple deployments, year-long absences, and physical and mental disabilities that result from military service. To provide specialized support for active duty service members and veterans’ child support and parenting time needs, the Texas Office of the Attorney General – Child Support Division (OAG-CSD) developed the Help Establishing Responsive Orders and Ensuring Support (HEROES) for Children in Military Families pilot program. The HEROES project is designed to provide enhanced, family-centered child support services with the objectives of increasing compliance with current child support obligations; ensuring accurate establishment of support orders, expediting review and adjustments of orders; preventing the accumulation of arrears; and supporting increased parenting cooperation. The OAG-CSD asked Dr. Cynthia Osborne and CFRP to evaluate the implementation of the pilot program.  CFRP’s goals are to determine the unique challenges that military and veteran families face in regards to child support and parenting; document what the HEROES project has done to address these unique challenges; identify lessons learned through the pilot program that enhance or limit the successful implementation of the HEROES project; and provide recommendations to the OAG-CSD on how the HEROES project may address any challenges that arise. (Author introduction)

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