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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Fein, David; Hamadyk, Jill
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    This report assesses the implementation and early impacts of Year Up, a national sectoral training program for young adults aged 18-24. Year Up aims to help low-income, low-skilled adults access and complete training leading to employment in high-demand, well-paying occupations. It is among nine programs Abt Associates is evaluating in Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE)—a study sponsored by the Administration for Children and Families. Operated by an organization of the same name, Year Up provides young adults with six months of full-time training in the IT and financial service sectors followed by six-month internships at major firms. The full-time program provides extensive supports—including weekly stipends—and puts a heavy emphasis on the development of professional and technical skills. Using a rigorous research design, the study found that young adults with access to Year Up had higher average quarterly earnings in the sixth and seventh quarters after random assignment—the confirmatory outcome selected to gauge Year Up’s overall success for this report....

    This report assesses the implementation and early impacts of Year Up, a national sectoral training program for young adults aged 18-24. Year Up aims to help low-income, low-skilled adults access and complete training leading to employment in high-demand, well-paying occupations. It is among nine programs Abt Associates is evaluating in Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE)—a study sponsored by the Administration for Children and Families. Operated by an organization of the same name, Year Up provides young adults with six months of full-time training in the IT and financial service sectors followed by six-month internships at major firms. The full-time program provides extensive supports—including weekly stipends—and puts a heavy emphasis on the development of professional and technical skills. Using a rigorous research design, the study found that young adults with access to Year Up had higher average quarterly earnings in the sixth and seventh quarters after random assignment—the confirmatory outcome selected to gauge Year Up’s overall success for this report. Compared to control group members who were not able to access the program, treatment group members also were more likely to report that their classes used active learning methods, taught life skills, and were relevant to their lives and careers. Persisting over a three-year follow-up period, Year Up’s earnings impacts are the largest reported to date for workforce programs tested using a random assignment design. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Rue, Lisa; Chamberlain, Seth; Covington, Reginald; Goesling, Brian; Zief, Susan
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    This panel highlighted three studies funded through the Personal Responsibility Education Program multi-component evaluation and the Federal Evaluation of Selected Programs for Expectant and Parenting Youth. These evaluations document how teen pregnancy prevention initiatives and programs for expectant and parenting teens are implemented in the field and assess selected programs’ effectiveness. Seth Chamberlain (Administration for Children and Families) moderated the session and Lisa Rue (University of Northern Colorado) served as the discussant. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

    This panel highlighted three studies funded through the Personal Responsibility Education Program multi-component evaluation and the Federal Evaluation of Selected Programs for Expectant and Parenting Youth. These evaluations document how teen pregnancy prevention initiatives and programs for expectant and parenting teens are implemented in the field and assess selected programs’ effectiveness. Seth Chamberlain (Administration for Children and Families) moderated the session and Lisa Rue (University of Northern Colorado) served as the discussant. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Rui, Ning; Dynarski, Mark; Webber, Ann; Gutmann, Babette
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    School voucher, which allows families to have the opportunity to send their children to a school of their choice, has been the subject of much debate over the last few decades. While for some voucher serve as a useful vehicle for expanding school choice for the disadvantaged students, for others it might exacerbate the already severe racial and social segregation among schools, without extensive investments in schools' capacity in the beginning (Elmore 2002; Kim & Sunderman, 2005). The District of Columbia (DC) Opportunity Scholarship Program (OSP) is the only federally funded program that provides vouchers to low-income families to send their children to private schools that agree to accept them. The program selected students to receive scholarships using a lottery process in 2012, 2013, and 2014, which allows for an experimental design that compares outcomes for a treatment group and a control group.

    This paper examines how the offer and use of scholarship affected student and family outcomes, such as student achievement, satisfaction with schools, perceptions of...

    School voucher, which allows families to have the opportunity to send their children to a school of their choice, has been the subject of much debate over the last few decades. While for some voucher serve as a useful vehicle for expanding school choice for the disadvantaged students, for others it might exacerbate the already severe racial and social segregation among schools, without extensive investments in schools' capacity in the beginning (Elmore 2002; Kim & Sunderman, 2005). The District of Columbia (DC) Opportunity Scholarship Program (OSP) is the only federally funded program that provides vouchers to low-income families to send their children to private schools that agree to accept them. The program selected students to receive scholarships using a lottery process in 2012, 2013, and 2014, which allows for an experimental design that compares outcomes for a treatment group and a control group.

    This paper examines how the offer and use of scholarship affected student and family outcomes, such as student achievement, satisfaction with schools, perceptions of school safety, and parent involvement, in the first and second year after entering a lottery. The study also analyzes variations in the impacts across subgroups of students, which can be useful for understanding whether the program was effective, or more effective, for some and not others. In particular, we estimated the effects for four student subgroups that defined at the time students applied for the scholarship: (1) whether students were attending or not attending a school in need of improvement (SINI), (2) whether students scored above or below the mediation in reading, (3) whether students scored above or below the median in mathematics, and (4) whether students were in an elementary grade (k-5) or secondary grade (6-12).

    Overall, the study found a statistically significant negative impact on mathematics achievement and no impacts on reading achievement after one year. Negative impacts on both math and reading scores were found for students who were not applying from low-performing schools and for students in grades K-5. The program did not have a statistically significant impact on parents or students general satisfaction with the school the child attended in the first year. The program had a statistically significant positive impact on parents perceptions of safety at the school their child attended in that first year, but student perceptions of school safety were not significantly different between the groups. The OSP did not have a statistically significant impact on parent involvement in education. However, for parents of students in grades 6-12, the program had statistically significant positive impacts on involvement in education-related activities and events at home. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Riccio, James; Deitch, Victoria; Verma, Nandita
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    The purpose of the Rent Reform Demonstration is to test an alternative to the current rent-setting system for families using housing choice vouchers (HCV). The goals of the alternative rent-setting model now being tested are to incentivize employment and reduce the complexity and burden (and, thus, the cost) of administering the rent policy, while not causing unnecessary hardship for HCV households. The study team, PHAs, and HUD collaboratively designed the alternative rent model that is being tested at four local Moving to Work (MTW) public housing agencies (PHAs) sites with 6,600 participating HCV assisted households using a rigorous random assignment design. The four participating PHAs are the District of Columbia Housing Authority, Lexington Housing Authority, Louisville Metropolitan Housing Authority, and San Antonio Housing Authority. This report provides a detailed explanation of the alternative rent model, a description of the demonstration implementation, and an outline of the preliminary baseline information and survey data that has already been gathered from the...

    The purpose of the Rent Reform Demonstration is to test an alternative to the current rent-setting system for families using housing choice vouchers (HCV). The goals of the alternative rent-setting model now being tested are to incentivize employment and reduce the complexity and burden (and, thus, the cost) of administering the rent policy, while not causing unnecessary hardship for HCV households. The study team, PHAs, and HUD collaboratively designed the alternative rent model that is being tested at four local Moving to Work (MTW) public housing agencies (PHAs) sites with 6,600 participating HCV assisted households using a rigorous random assignment design. The four participating PHAs are the District of Columbia Housing Authority, Lexington Housing Authority, Louisville Metropolitan Housing Authority, and San Antonio Housing Authority. This report provides a detailed explanation of the alternative rent model, a description of the demonstration implementation, and an outline of the preliminary baseline information and survey data that has already been gathered from the assisted families participating in the study. Future reports will assess the impact of the alternative rent model at 12 and 36 months after random assignment on employment, earnings, and hardship for the study sample and on administrative efficiencies for the PHA, provide a process evaluation of the demonstration implementation, and analyze the cost effectiveness of the new rent policy compared to the existing rent policy. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Koiwai, Mark; Williams, Kim; Green, Mary
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2017

    This presentation from the Community Action Partnership 2017 Annual Convention discusses strategies for employment services across the stages of the ROMA Cycle: Assessment, Planning, Implementation, Achievement of Results, and Evaluation.

    This presentation from the Community Action Partnership 2017 Annual Convention discusses strategies for employment services across the stages of the ROMA Cycle: Assessment, Planning, Implementation, Achievement of Results, and Evaluation.

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