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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Cramer, Lindsey; Lynch, Mathew; Goff, Margaret; Esthappan, Sino; Reginal, Travis; Leitson, David
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2019

    This report documents evaluation findings of NYC Justice Corps, a workforce readiness and recidivism reduction program for justice-involved youth, and describes the strengths and challenges as perceived by program staff, participants, and stakeholders. The evaluation highlights what Justice Corps providers—and similar programs—might learn as they work to integrate the goals of education, employment, and cognitive and psychosocial development into program services and activities for justice-involved youth. The authors conclude by identifying actionable recommendations for future programming for youth in NYC, including providing services to at-risk youth and their families to help them connect with their communities and provide stability, building partnerships with local organizations and service providers to overcome barriers to engagement, and providing structured aftercare services such as mentoring or support groups. (Author abstract)

    This report documents evaluation findings of NYC Justice Corps, a workforce readiness and recidivism reduction program for justice-involved youth, and describes the strengths and challenges as perceived by program staff, participants, and stakeholders. The evaluation highlights what Justice Corps providers—and similar programs—might learn as they work to integrate the goals of education, employment, and cognitive and psychosocial development into program services and activities for justice-involved youth. The authors conclude by identifying actionable recommendations for future programming for youth in NYC, including providing services to at-risk youth and their families to help them connect with their communities and provide stability, building partnerships with local organizations and service providers to overcome barriers to engagement, and providing structured aftercare services such as mentoring or support groups. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Martinson, Karin; Harvill, Eleanor; Litwok, Daniel; Schwartz, Deena; De La Rosa, Siobhan Mills; Saunders, Correne; Bell, Stephen
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2019

    This report describes the implementation and impact study findings from an evaluation of the relative effectiveness of two approaches to providing job search assistance (JSA) to cash assistance applicants in New York City. From 2015 to 2016, the New York City Department of Social Services/Human Resources Administration administered two JSA programs for “job ready” cash assistance applicants: Back to Work (known as B2W, the pre-existing program) and Independent Job Search (IJS, a new program). The study examined the effects of these programs on cash assistance applicants, including both families with children and single, childless adults, who were determined to be able to work and who might need less job search assistance than other applicants.

    Using a rigorous research design, the study did not find a difference in employment rates or earnings during the six month follow-up period. However, compared to the IJS program, the B2W program increased the rate at which cash assistance applications were denied for not meeting application requirements and decreased the receipt of...

    This report describes the implementation and impact study findings from an evaluation of the relative effectiveness of two approaches to providing job search assistance (JSA) to cash assistance applicants in New York City. From 2015 to 2016, the New York City Department of Social Services/Human Resources Administration administered two JSA programs for “job ready” cash assistance applicants: Back to Work (known as B2W, the pre-existing program) and Independent Job Search (IJS, a new program). The study examined the effects of these programs on cash assistance applicants, including both families with children and single, childless adults, who were determined to be able to work and who might need less job search assistance than other applicants.

    Using a rigorous research design, the study did not find a difference in employment rates or earnings during the six month follow-up period. However, compared to the IJS program, the B2W program increased the rate at which cash assistance applications were denied for not meeting application requirements and decreased the receipt of cash assistance and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits. While participation in job search assistance services was high for both groups, compared to IJS, those assigned to the B2W program were more likely to participate in group and one-on-one activities and to attend these activities for a greater number of hours. (Edited author introduction)

     

  • Individual Author: Shapiro, Rachel; Wood, Robert G; Knab, Jean ; Murphy, Lauren
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    This brief summarizes key findings from a study of the implementation of the Teen Choice curriculum, a 12-session program that uses interactive exercises and guided discussions to deliver information to groups of 8 to 12 students on abstinence, contraception, sexually transmitted infections, and healthy relationships. With funding from a Personal Responsibility Education Program (PREP) grant, Inwood House—a nonprofit agency that developed the curriculum—implemented the program in New York City-area alternative schools for youth with emotional, behavioral, and academic challenges. The implementation study was conducted in conjunction with a rigorous impact study, in which students who agreed to take part in the study were randomly assigned to receive Teen Choice or their regular programming. (Author abstract)

     

    This brief summarizes key findings from a study of the implementation of the Teen Choice curriculum, a 12-session program that uses interactive exercises and guided discussions to deliver information to groups of 8 to 12 students on abstinence, contraception, sexually transmitted infections, and healthy relationships. With funding from a Personal Responsibility Education Program (PREP) grant, Inwood House—a nonprofit agency that developed the curriculum—implemented the program in New York City-area alternative schools for youth with emotional, behavioral, and academic challenges. The implementation study was conducted in conjunction with a rigorous impact study, in which students who agreed to take part in the study were randomly assigned to receive Teen Choice or their regular programming. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Fein, David; Hamadyk, Jill
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    This report assesses the implementation and early impacts of Year Up, a national sectoral training program for young adults aged 18-24. Year Up aims to help low-income, low-skilled adults access and complete training leading to employment in high-demand, well-paying occupations. It is among nine programs Abt Associates is evaluating in Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE)—a study sponsored by the Administration for Children and Families. Operated by an organization of the same name, Year Up provides young adults with six months of full-time training in the IT and financial service sectors followed by six-month internships at major firms. The full-time program provides extensive supports—including weekly stipends—and puts a heavy emphasis on the development of professional and technical skills. Using a rigorous research design, the study found that young adults with access to Year Up had higher average quarterly earnings in the sixth and seventh quarters after random assignment—the confirmatory outcome selected to gauge Year Up’s overall success for this report....

    This report assesses the implementation and early impacts of Year Up, a national sectoral training program for young adults aged 18-24. Year Up aims to help low-income, low-skilled adults access and complete training leading to employment in high-demand, well-paying occupations. It is among nine programs Abt Associates is evaluating in Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE)—a study sponsored by the Administration for Children and Families. Operated by an organization of the same name, Year Up provides young adults with six months of full-time training in the IT and financial service sectors followed by six-month internships at major firms. The full-time program provides extensive supports—including weekly stipends—and puts a heavy emphasis on the development of professional and technical skills. Using a rigorous research design, the study found that young adults with access to Year Up had higher average quarterly earnings in the sixth and seventh quarters after random assignment—the confirmatory outcome selected to gauge Year Up’s overall success for this report. Compared to control group members who were not able to access the program, treatment group members also were more likely to report that their classes used active learning methods, taught life skills, and were relevant to their lives and careers. Persisting over a three-year follow-up period, Year Up’s earnings impacts are the largest reported to date for workforce programs tested using a random assignment design. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Cramer, Lindsey; Lynch, Mathew; Lipman, Micaela; Yu, Lilly; Astone, Nan Marie
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    This report presents the findings of an implementation and outcome evaluation of the Advocate, Intervene, Mentor (AIM) program, a court-mandated juvenile alternative-to-placement program serving probation clients ages 13 to 18 years with high criminogenic risk. The evaluation finds that AIM successfully helps participants avoid out-of-home placement1 and reduce recidivism, as well as pursue and achieve individualized goals to help reduce their risk of reoffending. (Edited author introduction)

    This report presents the findings of an implementation and outcome evaluation of the Advocate, Intervene, Mentor (AIM) program, a court-mandated juvenile alternative-to-placement program serving probation clients ages 13 to 18 years with high criminogenic risk. The evaluation finds that AIM successfully helps participants avoid out-of-home placement1 and reduce recidivism, as well as pursue and achieve individualized goals to help reduce their risk of reoffending. (Edited author introduction)

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