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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Person, Ann E. ; Thomas, Jaime; Goble, Lisbeth
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    Competency-based education models allow students to move through material independently, advancing when they demonstrate content mastery. Proponents of competency-based approaches view them as a potential solution to student demand for flexible, career-relevant programs and to employer demand for skilled workers. This executive summary presents findings from the comprehensive evaluation of online, competency-based information technology programs offered by a consortium of three community colleges under a grant from the U.S. Department of Labor Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training grant program. The document summarizes findings on program implementation and outcomes. It concludes with a discussion of the implications of the evaluation findings for the ongoing public conversation around competency-based education, especially its application in community college contexts. (Author abstract)

    Competency-based education models allow students to move through material independently, advancing when they demonstrate content mastery. Proponents of competency-based approaches view them as a potential solution to student demand for flexible, career-relevant programs and to employer demand for skilled workers. This executive summary presents findings from the comprehensive evaluation of online, competency-based information technology programs offered by a consortium of three community colleges under a grant from the U.S. Department of Labor Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training grant program. The document summarizes findings on program implementation and outcomes. It concludes with a discussion of the implications of the evaluation findings for the ongoing public conversation around competency-based education, especially its application in community college contexts. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Farrell, Mary
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2015

    This powerpoint presentation from the 2015 NAWRS conference describes an evaluation of Refugee Social Services (RSS) and Targeted Assistance Grant (TAG) programs. These programs are designed to help refugees achieve economic self-sufficiency and social adjustment. The presentation concludes by introducing a new study focusing on the integration of TANF, Refugee Cash Assistance, and associated services. (Presentation summary)

    This powerpoint presentation from the 2015 NAWRS conference describes an evaluation of Refugee Social Services (RSS) and Targeted Assistance Grant (TAG) programs. These programs are designed to help refugees achieve economic self-sufficiency and social adjustment. The presentation concludes by introducing a new study focusing on the integration of TANF, Refugee Cash Assistance, and associated services. (Presentation summary)

  • Individual Author: Dion, M. Robin; Kleinman, Rebecca; Kauff, Jackie; Dworsky, Amy
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    When youth in foster care reach age 18 (age 21 in some states) and leave the child welfare system without having achieved permanency through reunification, adoption, or legal guardianship, they must abruptly transition to living independently. Unlike their peers, these youth typically must make the transition without financial or other support from parents. As a result, many who age out of foster care find themselves homeless or precariously housed.

    One resource for such youth is the Family Unification Program (FUP). FUP is a special-purpose voucher program under the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD’s) Housing Choice Voucher (HCV, also known as Section 8) program. The primary purpose of FUP is to provide housing vouchers to child-welfare involved families for whom the lack of adequate housing is the primary reason for imminent out-of-home placement of children or delays in family reunification. Youth ages 18 to 21 who leave foster care at age 16 or older and who do not have adequate housing, however, are also eligible for a time-limited housing...

    When youth in foster care reach age 18 (age 21 in some states) and leave the child welfare system without having achieved permanency through reunification, adoption, or legal guardianship, they must abruptly transition to living independently. Unlike their peers, these youth typically must make the transition without financial or other support from parents. As a result, many who age out of foster care find themselves homeless or precariously housed.

    One resource for such youth is the Family Unification Program (FUP). FUP is a special-purpose voucher program under the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD’s) Housing Choice Voucher (HCV, also known as Section 8) program. The primary purpose of FUP is to provide housing vouchers to child-welfare involved families for whom the lack of adequate housing is the primary reason for imminent out-of-home placement of children or delays in family reunification. Youth ages 18 to 21 who leave foster care at age 16 or older and who do not have adequate housing, however, are also eligible for a time-limited housing voucher. FUP vouchers offer up to 18 months of rental subsidy and supportive services to help such youth gain skills for independent living.

    FUP functions as an interagency collaboration between local public housing agencies (PHAs) and public child welfare agencies (PCWAs). Participating communities decide whether to apply for FUP vouchers, and, if awarded vouchers, whether to serve families, youth, or both in their FUP programs. In communities using FUP for youth, PCWAs refer eligible youth to PHAs and offer supportive services to those who receive a FUP voucher. When PHAs receive youth referrals, they verify HCV eligibility and subsidize the rent of eligible youth who are able to find and secure housing.

    This report describes the extent to which—and how—communities are using FUP to support youth. The research draws on findings from a survey of PHAs administering FUP, a survey of PCWAs partnered with PHAs that serve youth, and site visits to four areas that use FUP to serve youth. The surveys were designed to identify the universe of communities providing FUP vouchers to youth and to gather basic information about how they administer the program. The site visits sought to provide a finer grained understanding of how communities are using FUP to serve this population and sought to identify promising practices and lessons learned. (author summary)

  • Individual Author: Cunningham, Mary; Burt, Martha; Biess, Jennifer; Emam, Dina
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    This interim evaluation report describes the first year of the Veterans Homelessness Prevention Demonstration (VHPD). Funded in FY2009, the VHPD is a joint effort of the U.S. Departments of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), Veterans Affairs (VA), and Labor (DOL) to provide homelessness prevention and rapid rehousing to veterans, especially those returning from conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. The VHPD has five sites, with each associated with a military base and a Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC). The sites are in Utica, NY; Tampa Bay, FL; Tacoma, WA; San Diego, CA; and Austin, Texas. It is the first attempt to investigate homelessness prevention and rapid rehousing services for veterans and their families.

    Prevention and rapid rehousing are necessary components in any plan to end homelessness. Veterans are at greater risk of homelessness than comparable non-veterans, with veterans of recent conflicts possibly at higher risk than veterans of earlier conflicts. Further, compared to earlier generations of veterans, service members returning from post-9/11...

    This interim evaluation report describes the first year of the Veterans Homelessness Prevention Demonstration (VHPD). Funded in FY2009, the VHPD is a joint effort of the U.S. Departments of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), Veterans Affairs (VA), and Labor (DOL) to provide homelessness prevention and rapid rehousing to veterans, especially those returning from conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. The VHPD has five sites, with each associated with a military base and a Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC). The sites are in Utica, NY; Tampa Bay, FL; Tacoma, WA; San Diego, CA; and Austin, Texas. It is the first attempt to investigate homelessness prevention and rapid rehousing services for veterans and their families.

    Prevention and rapid rehousing are necessary components in any plan to end homelessness. Veterans are at greater risk of homelessness than comparable non-veterans, with veterans of recent conflicts possibly at higher risk than veterans of earlier conflicts. Further, compared to earlier generations of veterans, service members returning from post-9/11 conflicts include more women, parents, and members of the National Guard and Reserve units. Because of this, Congress intended that the VHPD evaluation investigate ways to reach and serve veterans at risk of homelessness among these subgroups. (author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Farrell, Mary
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    This brief provides an overall summary of the lessons learned from the TANF-SSI Disability Transition Project. It brings together material spread across other documents in a concise format, and it also offers new insights from state-level data analyses that largely back up the conclusions drawn from federal data. (author abstract) 

    This brief provides an overall summary of the lessons learned from the TANF-SSI Disability Transition Project. It brings together material spread across other documents in a concise format, and it also offers new insights from state-level data analyses that largely back up the conclusions drawn from federal data. (author abstract) 

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