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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Weigensberg, Elizabeth; Cornwell, Derekh; Leininger, Lindsey; Stagner, Matthew; LeBarron, Sarah; Gellar, Jonathan; MacIntyre, Sophie; Chapman, Richard; Maher, Erin J.; Pecora, Peter J.; O'Brien, Kirk
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    Mathematica and Casey Family Programs have published the final report from a project linking child welfare and Medicaid data to conduct analyses to understand types of high service use and to identify factors predictive of high service use among children in foster care. The study identifies distinct types of high service users and how both child welfare and Medicaid data can be used to predict which children may be likely to experience high degrees of placement instability. The study was conducted in partnership with partners in two states—Tennessee’s Department of Children’s Services and TennCare, and Florida’s Department of Children and Families, Agency for Health Care Administration, and Eckerd Kids. The goal of the project is to help child welfare, Medicaid and other service providing agencies better coordinate service delivery to prevent undesirable outcomes for children and to improve effectiveness and efficiency. (Author abstract) 

    Mathematica and Casey Family Programs have published the final report from a project linking child welfare and Medicaid data to conduct analyses to understand types of high service use and to identify factors predictive of high service use among children in foster care. The study identifies distinct types of high service users and how both child welfare and Medicaid data can be used to predict which children may be likely to experience high degrees of placement instability. The study was conducted in partnership with partners in two states—Tennessee’s Department of Children’s Services and TennCare, and Florida’s Department of Children and Families, Agency for Health Care Administration, and Eckerd Kids. The goal of the project is to help child welfare, Medicaid and other service providing agencies better coordinate service delivery to prevent undesirable outcomes for children and to improve effectiveness and efficiency. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Rosenblatt, Raphael; Silverberg, Marsha; Fein, David; Maynard, Rebecca; Provasnik, Stephen
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    This video and its accompanying presentation slides are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). The session began with an overview of the Program for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC) population-level data and how analysis of new education-employment variables can help promote young adults’ self-sufficiency. Then, two presentations featured Year Up, one of the nation’s foremost programs for low-income youth. Evaluation findings from both Year Up’s core model and its Professional Training Corps model were presented. Marsha Silverberg (U.S. Department of Education) served as the moderator. Raphael Rosenblatt (Year Up) served as the discussant. (Author introduction)

    This video and its accompanying presentation slides are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). The session began with an overview of the Program for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC) population-level data and how analysis of new education-employment variables can help promote young adults’ self-sufficiency. Then, two presentations featured Year Up, one of the nation’s foremost programs for low-income youth. Evaluation findings from both Year Up’s core model and its Professional Training Corps model were presented. Marsha Silverberg (U.S. Department of Education) served as the moderator. Raphael Rosenblatt (Year Up) served as the discussant. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Person, Ann E. ; Thomas, Jaime; Goble, Lisbeth
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    Competency-based education models allow students to move through material independently, advancing when they demonstrate content mastery. Proponents of competency-based approaches view them as a potential solution to student demand for flexible, career-relevant programs and to employer demand for skilled workers. This executive summary presents findings from the comprehensive evaluation of online, competency-based information technology programs offered by a consortium of three community colleges under a grant from the U.S. Department of Labor Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training grant program. The document summarizes findings on program implementation and outcomes. It concludes with a discussion of the implications of the evaluation findings for the ongoing public conversation around competency-based education, especially its application in community college contexts. (Author abstract)

    Competency-based education models allow students to move through material independently, advancing when they demonstrate content mastery. Proponents of competency-based approaches view them as a potential solution to student demand for flexible, career-relevant programs and to employer demand for skilled workers. This executive summary presents findings from the comprehensive evaluation of online, competency-based information technology programs offered by a consortium of three community colleges under a grant from the U.S. Department of Labor Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training grant program. The document summarizes findings on program implementation and outcomes. It concludes with a discussion of the implications of the evaluation findings for the ongoing public conversation around competency-based education, especially its application in community college contexts. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Lauren Eyster; Nightingale, Demetra Smith ; Barnow, Burt S. ; O'Brien, Carolyn T. ; Trutko, John ; Kuehn, Daniel
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    The High Growth Job Training Initiative (HGJTI) was a national grant program administered by the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL), Employment and Training Administration (ETA). Between 2001 and 2007, more than 160 grants were awarded to establish industry-focused job training and related projects designed to meet the industry's workforce challenges. This report is the third and final in a series from the national evaluation of the HGJTI conducted by the Urban Institute, the Institute for Policy Studies at Johns Hopkins University, and Capital Research Corporation. This report documents the national initiative, describes the structure and implementation of projects by selected grantees, and provides nonexperimental analysis of the early impacts of job training in selected HGJTI-funded programs. The analysis relies on a review of grant applications and quarterly reports; visits to nine selected grantee sites; data collected from grantee training programs; quarterly earnings data from state unemployment insurance wage records; and administrative data from state and local public...

    The High Growth Job Training Initiative (HGJTI) was a national grant program administered by the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL), Employment and Training Administration (ETA). Between 2001 and 2007, more than 160 grants were awarded to establish industry-focused job training and related projects designed to meet the industry's workforce challenges. This report is the third and final in a series from the national evaluation of the HGJTI conducted by the Urban Institute, the Institute for Policy Studies at Johns Hopkins University, and Capital Research Corporation. This report documents the national initiative, describes the structure and implementation of projects by selected grantees, and provides nonexperimental analysis of the early impacts of job training in selected HGJTI-funded programs. The analysis relies on a review of grant applications and quarterly reports; visits to nine selected grantee sites; data collected from grantee training programs; quarterly earnings data from state unemployment insurance wage records; and administrative data from state and local public workforce system agencies. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Holcomb, Pamela A.; Adams, Gina; Snyder, Kathleen; Koralek, Robin; Martinson, Karin; Bernstein, Sara; Capizzano, Jeffrey
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2006

    Despite the critical role child care subsidies play in welfare-to-work efforts, little research has examined how sites have approached putting these services together for families. The Urban Institute engaged in a multiyear study to help fill the information gap about the complex interactions of these two systems on behalf of welfare families (box 2). This study occurred in three phases.

    The first phase, conducted in 2001, examined these issues from the perspective of welfare-to-work and child care administrators and staff in 11 local sites, and documented how these systems were set up and connected, the factors that aided or impeded coordination between the systems, and the processes TANF clients needed to complete as they moved through the welfare-to-work and child care subsidy systems while on welfare. (The findings from this phase are reported in Gina Adams, Pamela Holcomb, Kathleen Snyder, Robin Koralek, and Jeffrey Capizzano, Child Care Subsidies for TANF Families: The Nexus of Systems and Policies [Washington, DC: The Urban Institute, 2006].)...

    Despite the critical role child care subsidies play in welfare-to-work efforts, little research has examined how sites have approached putting these services together for families. The Urban Institute engaged in a multiyear study to help fill the information gap about the complex interactions of these two systems on behalf of welfare families (box 2). This study occurred in three phases.

    The first phase, conducted in 2001, examined these issues from the perspective of welfare-to-work and child care administrators and staff in 11 local sites, and documented how these systems were set up and connected, the factors that aided or impeded coordination between the systems, and the processes TANF clients needed to complete as they moved through the welfare-to-work and child care subsidy systems while on welfare. (The findings from this phase are reported in Gina Adams, Pamela Holcomb, Kathleen Snyder, Robin Koralek, and Jeffrey Capizzano, Child Care Subsidies for TANF Families: The Nexus of Systems and Policies [Washington, DC: The Urban Institute, 2006].)

    The second phase of the study examined a range of issues around subsidy use among parents who leave TANF. It included data from these 11 sites, as well as an examination of research on welfare leavers and subsidy patterns, a review of state policies regarding child care subsidies for welfare leavers for a range of states, and interviews with national experts to discuss the retention of child care subsidies as parents transition off cash assistance. (The findings from this phase are reported in Gina Adams, Robin Koralek, and Karin Martinson, Child Care Subsidies and Leaving Welfare: Policy Issues and Strategies [Washington, DC: The Urban Institute, 2006].)

    The third phase used focus groups in four of the 11 sites to explore the connections between the welfare-to-work and child care systems from the perspective of parents. These focus groups were made up of parents currently receiving TANF and child care subsidies, as well as parents who had left TANF within the previous year and were still receiving child care subsidies. (The findings from this phase are reported in Kathleen Snyder, Sara Bernstein, and Robin Koralek, Parents' Perspectives on Child Care Subsidies and Moving from Welfare to Work [Washington, DC: The Urban Institute, 2006].)

    This document highlights overarching issues and themes that emerged from all three phases of this study, including those facing administrators and agencies working to provide these services to parents, and the implications of these issues for TANF clients and their children. (author abstract)

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