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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Rosenblatt, Raphael; Silverberg, Marsha; Fein, David; Maynard, Rebecca; Provasnik, Stephen
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    This video and its accompanying presentation slides are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). The session began with an overview of the Program for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC) population-level data and how analysis of new education-employment variables can help promote young adults’ self-sufficiency. Then, two presentations featured Year Up, one of the nation’s foremost programs for low-income youth. Evaluation findings from both Year Up’s core model and its Professional Training Corps model were presented. Marsha Silverberg (U.S. Department of Education) served as the moderator. Raphael Rosenblatt (Year Up) served as the discussant. (Author introduction)

    This video and its accompanying presentation slides are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). The session began with an overview of the Program for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC) population-level data and how analysis of new education-employment variables can help promote young adults’ self-sufficiency. Then, two presentations featured Year Up, one of the nation’s foremost programs for low-income youth. Evaluation findings from both Year Up’s core model and its Professional Training Corps model were presented. Marsha Silverberg (U.S. Department of Education) served as the moderator. Raphael Rosenblatt (Year Up) served as the discussant. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Bellotti, Jeanne; Sattar, Samina; Gould-Werth, Alix; Berk, Jillian; Gutierrez, Ivette; Stein, Jillian; Betesh, Hannah; Ochoa, Lindsay; Wiegand, Andrew
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    To help individuals successfully reenter society after time in jail, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) awarded $10 million in grants to 20 local workforce development boards (LWDBs) in June 2015 for the Linking to Employment Activities PreRelease (LEAP) initiative. Central to the LEAP initiative was creating jail-based American Job Centers (AJCs) with direct linkages to community-based AJCs. A complex array of factors including jail and local community characteristics influenced the development and operations of jail-based AJCs as well as the experiences and outcomes of participants (Figure ES.1). The overarching goals were to increase participants’ work readiness at the time of release, increase employment after release, and reduce recidivism; additional goals for the pilot initiative included demonstrating that corrections and workforce agencies could effectively collaborate to provide pre-release services, generate lessons learned around promising strategies and common challenges that could inform future efforts; and identify ways for grantees to sustain the jail-based AJCs...

    To help individuals successfully reenter society after time in jail, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) awarded $10 million in grants to 20 local workforce development boards (LWDBs) in June 2015 for the Linking to Employment Activities PreRelease (LEAP) initiative. Central to the LEAP initiative was creating jail-based American Job Centers (AJCs) with direct linkages to community-based AJCs. A complex array of factors including jail and local community characteristics influenced the development and operations of jail-based AJCs as well as the experiences and outcomes of participants (Figure ES.1). The overarching goals were to increase participants’ work readiness at the time of release, increase employment after release, and reduce recidivism; additional goals for the pilot initiative included demonstrating that corrections and workforce agencies could effectively collaborate to provide pre-release services, generate lessons learned around promising strategies and common challenges that could inform future efforts; and identify ways for grantees to sustain the jail-based AJCs when the DOL-funded grant ended. The grants covered 9 months of planning and 15 months of service delivery, with many grantees receiving up to a one-year no-cost extension to finish spending down remaining grant resources. Grantees were geographically diverse, located in 13 states across 5 DOL regions, and involved a total of 22 county jails.

    Workforce development, corrections, and other partners, as well as participants, identified many successes along with significant challenges and promising strategies to address them. The qualitative evidence collected through this implementation evaluation suggests that introducing new services, partnerships, and ways of thinking about reentry hold promise for lasting effects on the workforce and corrections systems in some sites. The experiences of the LEAP grantees highlight important lessons learned and some areas for continued refinement or potential replication in similar or different contexts. Although this implementation evaluation cannot make causal claims, the evidence suggests that it is possible to use jail-based AJCs to link participants to post-release services and that this may be a promising approach to support returning individuals in successful reentry. (Edited author executive summary)

  • Individual Author: Stagner, Matthew; Vogel, Lisa Klein; Knas, Emily; Fung, Nickie; Worthington, Julie; Bradley, M. C.; D'Angelo, Angela; Gothro, Andrew; Powers, Courtney
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Youth and young adults with child welfare involvement face significant challenges in their transition to adulthood—challenges that increase their risk of becoming homeless. Evidence on “what works” for youth in foster care or young adults formerly in foster care is limited (Courtney et al. 2007). To expand this evidence base, the Children’s Bureau (CB) within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) developed a multi-phase grant initiative for planning, implementing, and evaluating comprehensive service models intended to prevent homelessness among youth and young adults with child welfare involvement. The funding opportunity announcement (FOA) for the first phase of this initiative was called “Planning Grants to Develop a Model Intervention for Youth/Young Adults with Child Welfare Involvement At Risk of Homelessness” (Phase I).

    In September 2013, the start of the first phase, CB awarded 18 two-year planning grants, each worth up to $360,000 per year. Grantees were to focus on three populations: (1) adolescents who enter foster care between 14 and 17, (2) young...

    Youth and young adults with child welfare involvement face significant challenges in their transition to adulthood—challenges that increase their risk of becoming homeless. Evidence on “what works” for youth in foster care or young adults formerly in foster care is limited (Courtney et al. 2007). To expand this evidence base, the Children’s Bureau (CB) within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) developed a multi-phase grant initiative for planning, implementing, and evaluating comprehensive service models intended to prevent homelessness among youth and young adults with child welfare involvement. The funding opportunity announcement (FOA) for the first phase of this initiative was called “Planning Grants to Develop a Model Intervention for Youth/Young Adults with Child Welfare Involvement At Risk of Homelessness” (Phase I).

    In September 2013, the start of the first phase, CB awarded 18 two-year planning grants, each worth up to $360,000 per year. Grantees were to focus on three populations: (1) adolescents who enter foster care between 14 and 17, (2) young adults aging out of foster care, and (3) homeless youth/young adults with foster care histories up to 21.

    The focus of this report is a process study of Phase I. The report documents the activities and progress grantees made over the course of the planning period. (Edited author executive summary)

     

  • Individual Author: Klein Vogel, Lisa ; Bradley, M. C.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This brief discusses the capacity strategy associated with "The Framework to End Youth Homelessness: A Resource Text for Dialogue and Action," (USICH, 2013) (herafter referred to as the “Framework”) and how the strategy was implemented by YARH Phase I grantees (Figure 1). This framework expanded on the 2010 strategic plan, “Opening Doors,” which was geared toward preventing homelessness among multiple populations (USICH, 2010). The 2013 framework targets the specific challenges and needs of homeless adolescents as they transition to adulthood. It presents a data strategy, a capacity strategy, and an intervention model designed to prevent and eradicate homelessness among unaccompanied youth. The information in this brief comes from grant applications, semi-annual progress reports submitted by YARH grantees, and two-day site visits with each grantee in January – March 2015. (Edited author summary)

     

     

    This brief discusses the capacity strategy associated with "The Framework to End Youth Homelessness: A Resource Text for Dialogue and Action," (USICH, 2013) (herafter referred to as the “Framework”) and how the strategy was implemented by YARH Phase I grantees (Figure 1). This framework expanded on the 2010 strategic plan, “Opening Doors,” which was geared toward preventing homelessness among multiple populations (USICH, 2010). The 2013 framework targets the specific challenges and needs of homeless adolescents as they transition to adulthood. It presents a data strategy, a capacity strategy, and an intervention model designed to prevent and eradicate homelessness among unaccompanied youth. The information in this brief comes from grant applications, semi-annual progress reports submitted by YARH grantees, and two-day site visits with each grantee in January – March 2015. (Edited author summary)

     

     

  • Individual Author: Cunningham, Mary; Burt, Martha; Biess, Jennifer; Emam, Dina
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    This interim evaluation report describes the first year of the Veterans Homelessness Prevention Demonstration (VHPD). Funded in FY2009, the VHPD is a joint effort of the U.S. Departments of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), Veterans Affairs (VA), and Labor (DOL) to provide homelessness prevention and rapid rehousing to veterans, especially those returning from conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. The VHPD has five sites, with each associated with a military base and a Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC). The sites are in Utica, NY; Tampa Bay, FL; Tacoma, WA; San Diego, CA; and Austin, Texas. It is the first attempt to investigate homelessness prevention and rapid rehousing services for veterans and their families.

    Prevention and rapid rehousing are necessary components in any plan to end homelessness. Veterans are at greater risk of homelessness than comparable non-veterans, with veterans of recent conflicts possibly at higher risk than veterans of earlier conflicts. Further, compared to earlier generations of veterans, service members returning from post-9/11...

    This interim evaluation report describes the first year of the Veterans Homelessness Prevention Demonstration (VHPD). Funded in FY2009, the VHPD is a joint effort of the U.S. Departments of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), Veterans Affairs (VA), and Labor (DOL) to provide homelessness prevention and rapid rehousing to veterans, especially those returning from conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. The VHPD has five sites, with each associated with a military base and a Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC). The sites are in Utica, NY; Tampa Bay, FL; Tacoma, WA; San Diego, CA; and Austin, Texas. It is the first attempt to investigate homelessness prevention and rapid rehousing services for veterans and their families.

    Prevention and rapid rehousing are necessary components in any plan to end homelessness. Veterans are at greater risk of homelessness than comparable non-veterans, with veterans of recent conflicts possibly at higher risk than veterans of earlier conflicts. Further, compared to earlier generations of veterans, service members returning from post-9/11 conflicts include more women, parents, and members of the National Guard and Reserve units. Because of this, Congress intended that the VHPD evaluation investigate ways to reach and serve veterans at risk of homelessness among these subgroups. (author abstract)

     

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