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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Stagner, Matthew; Vogel, Lisa Klein; Knas, Emily; Fung, Nickie; Worthington, Julie; Bradley, M. C.; D'Angelo, Angela; Gothro, Andrew; Powers, Courtney
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Youth and young adults with child welfare involvement face significant challenges in their transition to adulthood—challenges that increase their risk of becoming homeless. Evidence on “what works” for youth in foster care or young adults formerly in foster care is limited (Courtney et al. 2007). To expand this evidence base, the Children’s Bureau (CB) within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) developed a multi-phase grant initiative for planning, implementing, and evaluating comprehensive service models intended to prevent homelessness among youth and young adults with child welfare involvement. The funding opportunity announcement (FOA) for the first phase of this initiative was called “Planning Grants to Develop a Model Intervention for Youth/Young Adults with Child Welfare Involvement At Risk of Homelessness” (Phase I).

    In September 2013, the start of the first phase, CB awarded 18 two-year planning grants, each worth up to $360,000 per year. Grantees were to focus on three populations: (1) adolescents who enter foster care between 14 and 17, (2) young...

    Youth and young adults with child welfare involvement face significant challenges in their transition to adulthood—challenges that increase their risk of becoming homeless. Evidence on “what works” for youth in foster care or young adults formerly in foster care is limited (Courtney et al. 2007). To expand this evidence base, the Children’s Bureau (CB) within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) developed a multi-phase grant initiative for planning, implementing, and evaluating comprehensive service models intended to prevent homelessness among youth and young adults with child welfare involvement. The funding opportunity announcement (FOA) for the first phase of this initiative was called “Planning Grants to Develop a Model Intervention for Youth/Young Adults with Child Welfare Involvement At Risk of Homelessness” (Phase I).

    In September 2013, the start of the first phase, CB awarded 18 two-year planning grants, each worth up to $360,000 per year. Grantees were to focus on three populations: (1) adolescents who enter foster care between 14 and 17, (2) young adults aging out of foster care, and (3) homeless youth/young adults with foster care histories up to 21.

    The focus of this report is a process study of Phase I. The report documents the activities and progress grantees made over the course of the planning period. (Edited author executive summary)

     

  • Individual Author: Klein Vogel, Lisa ; Bradley, M. C.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This brief discusses the capacity strategy associated with "The Framework to End Youth Homelessness: A Resource Text for Dialogue and Action," (USICH, 2013) (herafter referred to as the “Framework”) and how the strategy was implemented by YARH Phase I grantees (Figure 1). This framework expanded on the 2010 strategic plan, “Opening Doors,” which was geared toward preventing homelessness among multiple populations (USICH, 2010). The 2013 framework targets the specific challenges and needs of homeless adolescents as they transition to adulthood. It presents a data strategy, a capacity strategy, and an intervention model designed to prevent and eradicate homelessness among unaccompanied youth. The information in this brief comes from grant applications, semi-annual progress reports submitted by YARH grantees, and two-day site visits with each grantee in January – March 2015. (Edited author summary)

     

     

    This brief discusses the capacity strategy associated with "The Framework to End Youth Homelessness: A Resource Text for Dialogue and Action," (USICH, 2013) (herafter referred to as the “Framework”) and how the strategy was implemented by YARH Phase I grantees (Figure 1). This framework expanded on the 2010 strategic plan, “Opening Doors,” which was geared toward preventing homelessness among multiple populations (USICH, 2010). The 2013 framework targets the specific challenges and needs of homeless adolescents as they transition to adulthood. It presents a data strategy, a capacity strategy, and an intervention model designed to prevent and eradicate homelessness among unaccompanied youth. The information in this brief comes from grant applications, semi-annual progress reports submitted by YARH grantees, and two-day site visits with each grantee in January – March 2015. (Edited author summary)

     

     

  • Individual Author: Paulsell, Diane; Max, Jeffrey; Derr, Michelle; Burwick, Andrew
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2007

    The public workforce investment system aims to serve all job seekers, but many of those most in need of help do not use it. Language barriers, dislike or fear of government agencies, limited awareness of available services, and difficulties using self-directed services are some of the challenges that may limit the accessibility of the system. While not traditionally partners in the workforce investment system, small, grassroots faith-based and community organizations (FBCOs) may be well positioned to serve people who do not currently use the public workforce system. Some job seekers may be more likely to access services from FBCOs because they typically have earned the trust of local community members and understand their needs. Moreover, FBCOs often provide personal, flexible, and comprehensive services that are well suited to people who face multiple barriers to employment.

    The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) has recognized that by filling a service gap and serving some of the neediest populations, FBCOs have the potential to be valuable partners in the workforce...

    The public workforce investment system aims to serve all job seekers, but many of those most in need of help do not use it. Language barriers, dislike or fear of government agencies, limited awareness of available services, and difficulties using self-directed services are some of the challenges that may limit the accessibility of the system. While not traditionally partners in the workforce investment system, small, grassroots faith-based and community organizations (FBCOs) may be well positioned to serve people who do not currently use the public workforce system. Some job seekers may be more likely to access services from FBCOs because they typically have earned the trust of local community members and understand their needs. Moreover, FBCOs often provide personal, flexible, and comprehensive services that are well suited to people who face multiple barriers to employment.

    The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) has recognized that by filling a service gap and serving some of the neediest populations, FBCOs have the potential to be valuable partners in the workforce investment system. Collaborating with FBCOs may also allow the government to leverage its workforce investment funds by taking advantage of the volunteers, donated goods and services, and other resources FBCOs are often able to access. Moreover, an FBCO’s knowledge of its community and its needs may help workforce investment agencies plan and deliver services more effectively.

    Collaborations between government agencies and FBCOs may not, however, come easily. In many communities, workforce investment agencies and grassroots FBCOs have little experience working together. Government agencies may not know about the work of FBCOs, and FBCOs may be unaware of the ways that public agencies could help their clients. Each may perceive the other’s mission as different from its own. In addition, government agencies may be concerned about their customers’ rights and legal issues when services are provided by faith-based organizations (FBOs), and the limited administrative and service capacity of some FBCOs may also be a barrier to collaborative relationships.

    Cognizant of the potential barriers to these collaborations, DOL has since 2002 granted over $30 million to promote and sustain collaborations between FBCOs and the workforce investment system. These grants have been made to FBCOs, states, intermediaries, and Workforce Investment Boards (WIBs). Intermediaries are larger nonprofit faith- or community-based agencies that can facilitate collaboration with smaller, grassroots organizations. WIBs are state or local entities that oversee the local workforce investment systems. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Miller, Cynthia; Bos, Johannes ; Porter, Kristin; Tseng, Fannie M.; Abe, Yasuyo
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2005

    The Center for Employment Training (CET), headquartered in San Jose, California, gained the attention of policymakers in the early 1990s, when it proved to be the only training program in two major evaluations (one of which, JOBSTART, targeted disadvantaged youth) to produce large positive effects on participants’ employment and earnings. Such documented success is rare among employment and training programs in general, but it is especially unusual among programs serving youth.

    The Evaluation of the Center for Employment Training Replication Sites –– initiated and funded by the U.S. Department of Labor –– sought to build on this remarkable performance by testing the CET model on out-of-school youth beyond its traditional base in San Jose. This final report in a series evaluating the replication effort presents findings after four and a half years of follow-up. It shows that, even in the sites that best implemented the model, CET had no overall employment and earnings effects for youth in the program, even though it increased participants’ hours of training and receipt of...

    The Center for Employment Training (CET), headquartered in San Jose, California, gained the attention of policymakers in the early 1990s, when it proved to be the only training program in two major evaluations (one of which, JOBSTART, targeted disadvantaged youth) to produce large positive effects on participants’ employment and earnings. Such documented success is rare among employment and training programs in general, but it is especially unusual among programs serving youth.

    The Evaluation of the Center for Employment Training Replication Sites –– initiated and funded by the U.S. Department of Labor –– sought to build on this remarkable performance by testing the CET model on out-of-school youth beyond its traditional base in San Jose. This final report in a series evaluating the replication effort presents findings after four and a half years of follow-up. It shows that, even in the sites that best implemented the model, CET had no overall employment and earnings effects for youth in the program, even though it increased participants’ hours of training and receipt of credentials. (Edited author preface)

  • Individual Author: Walsh, Stephen; Goldsmith, Deana; Abe, Yasuyo; Cann, Andrea
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2000

    The Evaluation of the CET Replication Sites has its origins in the remarkable performance of a single employment and training program: the Center for Employment Training. CET is a community-based employment and training organization with headquarters in San Jose, California. CET received extensive attention in the early 1990s through the involvement of its San Jose headquarters in two major studies of employment and training programs for disadvantaged individuals. Both studies reported that participants in CET-San Jose’s programs achieved substantial and statistically significant gains in employment and earnings as compared to a control group not receiving CET services. CET-San Jose’s results were particularly noteworthy in relation to the results of outwardly similar programs. Among 16 employment and training providers participating in these two studies, CET-San Jose alone produced statistically measurable employment and earnings gains for its clients.

    Encouraged by these results, the U.S. Department of Labor sought to investigate how CET-San Jose’s successes could...

    The Evaluation of the CET Replication Sites has its origins in the remarkable performance of a single employment and training program: the Center for Employment Training. CET is a community-based employment and training organization with headquarters in San Jose, California. CET received extensive attention in the early 1990s through the involvement of its San Jose headquarters in two major studies of employment and training programs for disadvantaged individuals. Both studies reported that participants in CET-San Jose’s programs achieved substantial and statistically significant gains in employment and earnings as compared to a control group not receiving CET services. CET-San Jose’s results were particularly noteworthy in relation to the results of outwardly similar programs. Among 16 employment and training providers participating in these two studies, CET-San Jose alone produced statistically measurable employment and earnings gains for its clients.

    Encouraged by these results, the U.S. Department of Labor sought to investigate how CET-San Jose’s successes could benefit out-of-school youth and, in 1995, began an evaluation of efforts to replicate CET. In doing so, the Department of Labor anticipated the increased emphasis on services to out-of-school youth that would be mandated in the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA). WIA requires that a minimum of 30 percent of youth funds shall be used to provide activities to out-of-school youth, and encourages local programs to develop long-term, intensive services for youth. The Evaluation of the CET Replication Sites targeted out-of-school youth exclusively, and sought to provide them with intensive and comprehensive services leading to employment. This report’s findings thus appear at a critical junction in the reform of employment and training services for out-of-school youth.

    The Evaluation of the CET Replication Sites involved 12 sites in total. Six sites were located in eastern and mid-western states, and had begun their efforts to replicate CET-San Jose’s services in the early 1990s. Six additional sites were selected randomly from among those located in western states that had been operating CET programs between 5 and 20 years. All of the western sites were divisions of the CET corporation, as were two of the eastern and mid-western sites. The remaining eastern and mid-western sites included two community-based organizations and two administrative entities under the Job Training Partnership Act, the federally-funded employment and training program that preceded WIA.

    To investigate the potential benefits of CET-San Jose for out-of-school youth, the Evaluation of the CET Replication Sites was designed to examine the implementation experiences of these twelve sites, and to measure their impacts on a range of important outcomes, such as employment and earnings. This report addresses the first of these goals. It relies on data collected between 1996 and 1999 to document and explore the implementation experiences of the replication sites. A second report, scheduled for completion in 2002, will utilize long-term data on individual outcomes of CET applicants who were randomly assigned to a program group eligible for CET services or to a control group not eligible to receive these services. (author introduction)

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