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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Briefel, Ronette; Melia, Micah; Harvey, Bonnie; Forrestal, Sarah; Chojnacki, Gregory ; Caronongan, Pia; Gothro, Andrew; Cabili, Charlotte; Kleinman, Rebecca; Gabor, Vivian; Redel, Nicholas; Gleason, Philip
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    This study—authorized by the 2010 Child Nutrition Act—tests innovative strategies to end childhood hunger and food insecurity. The interim evaluation report describes (1) the demonstration projects, (2) planning and early implementation activities, and (3) findings from the baseline data collection for four projects located within Chickasaw Nation, Kentucky, Nevada, and Virginia. A fifth demonstration project was implemented in Navajo Nation but not evaluated due to changes in program design. The demonstrations occurred during 2015-2017 and operated for 12 to 24 months. (Author abstract) 

    This study—authorized by the 2010 Child Nutrition Act—tests innovative strategies to end childhood hunger and food insecurity. The interim evaluation report describes (1) the demonstration projects, (2) planning and early implementation activities, and (3) findings from the baseline data collection for four projects located within Chickasaw Nation, Kentucky, Nevada, and Virginia. A fifth demonstration project was implemented in Navajo Nation but not evaluated due to changes in program design. The demonstrations occurred during 2015-2017 and operated for 12 to 24 months. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Dion, Robin; Holcomb, Pamela; Zaveri, Heather; D'Angelo, Angela Valdovinos; Clary, Elizabeth; Friend, Daniel; Baumgartner, Scott
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    Broad changes in family demographics have left many children without the support or involvement of their fathers. As a result of high rates of nonmarital births and divorce, millions of American children do not live with both of their parents. Rates of nonresidence are particularly high among groups that tend to face more economic challenges: 58 percent of black children and 31 percent of Hispanic children were living without their biological fathers in 2012. Father absence is associated with a range of unfavorable outcomes for children, including poor social-emotional adjustment, dropping out of school, and experiencing mental health problems as adults.

    Research suggests that the negative effects for children of father absence may be mitigated through greater father involvement. Nonresidential fathers’ greater contact with their children is associated with fewer child and adolescent behavior problems. The quality of father-child interaction also appears to matter. Nonresidential fathers’ engagement in child-related activities has been found to be linked to positive social...

    Broad changes in family demographics have left many children without the support or involvement of their fathers. As a result of high rates of nonmarital births and divorce, millions of American children do not live with both of their parents. Rates of nonresidence are particularly high among groups that tend to face more economic challenges: 58 percent of black children and 31 percent of Hispanic children were living without their biological fathers in 2012. Father absence is associated with a range of unfavorable outcomes for children, including poor social-emotional adjustment, dropping out of school, and experiencing mental health problems as adults.

    Research suggests that the negative effects for children of father absence may be mitigated through greater father involvement. Nonresidential fathers’ greater contact with their children is associated with fewer child and adolescent behavior problems. The quality of father-child interaction also appears to matter. Nonresidential fathers’ engagement in child-related activities has been found to be linked to positive social, emotional and behavioral adjustment in children.

    To address these issues, Congress has funded the Responsible Fatherhood (RF) grant program since 2006. The grant program is administered by the Office of Family Assistance at the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. RF grants require programs to offer services for fathers in three areas: parenting and fatherhood, economic stability, and healthy marriage and relationships.

    The Parents and Children Together (PACT) evaluation is studying four RF programs using a rigorous multi-component research design. Conducted by Mathematica Policy Research for the Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation at ACF, PACT focuses on three broad areas: fathers’ backgrounds, views, and experiences (qualitative study component), how the programs were implemented (implementation study component), and the programs’ effects on fathers’ outcomes (impact study component). Recognizing that RF programming will continue to grow and evolve, PACT is providing a building block in the evidence base to guide ongoing and future program design and evaluation efforts. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Rue, Lisa; Chamberlain, Seth; Covington, Reginald; Goesling, Brian; Zief, Susan
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    This panel highlighted three studies funded through the Personal Responsibility Education Program multi-component evaluation and the Federal Evaluation of Selected Programs for Expectant and Parenting Youth. These evaluations document how teen pregnancy prevention initiatives and programs for expectant and parenting teens are implemented in the field and assess selected programs’ effectiveness. Seth Chamberlain (Administration for Children and Families) moderated the session and Lisa Rue (University of Northern Colorado) served as the discussant. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

    This panel highlighted three studies funded through the Personal Responsibility Education Program multi-component evaluation and the Federal Evaluation of Selected Programs for Expectant and Parenting Youth. These evaluations document how teen pregnancy prevention initiatives and programs for expectant and parenting teens are implemented in the field and assess selected programs’ effectiveness. Seth Chamberlain (Administration for Children and Families) moderated the session and Lisa Rue (University of Northern Colorado) served as the discussant. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Eismann, Emily A.; Theuerling, Jack; Maguire, Sabine; Hente, Elizabeth A.; Shapiro, Robert A.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2018

    This project sought to assess the generalizability, barriers, and facilitators of implementing the Safe Environment for Every Kid (SEEK) model for addressing psychosocial risk factors for maltreatment across multiple primary care settings, including a pediatric practice, federally qualified health center, and family medicine practice. The SEEK model includes screening caregivers for psychosocial risk factors at well-child visits age 0 to 5 years, brief intervention incorporating principles of motivational interviewing to engage caregivers, and referral to treatment. All practices successfully implemented SEEK, with screening completion rates from 75% to 93% and brief intervention rates from 61% to 81%. Major parental stress (14%) and food insecurity (11%) were the most common risk factors. Providers found SEEK worthwhile for improving their knowledge, skills, and ability to address psychosocial concerns and provide whole person care. Barriers included limited time and resources, incomplete resource knowledge, and lack of follow-up. Facilitators included on-site support staff to...

    This project sought to assess the generalizability, barriers, and facilitators of implementing the Safe Environment for Every Kid (SEEK) model for addressing psychosocial risk factors for maltreatment across multiple primary care settings, including a pediatric practice, federally qualified health center, and family medicine practice. The SEEK model includes screening caregivers for psychosocial risk factors at well-child visits age 0 to 5 years, brief intervention incorporating principles of motivational interviewing to engage caregivers, and referral to treatment. All practices successfully implemented SEEK, with screening completion rates from 75% to 93% and brief intervention rates from 61% to 81%. Major parental stress (14%) and food insecurity (11%) were the most common risk factors. Providers found SEEK worthwhile for improving their knowledge, skills, and ability to address psychosocial concerns and provide whole person care. Barriers included limited time and resources, incomplete resource knowledge, and lack of follow-up. Facilitators included on-site support staff to assist with communication and referrals. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Baxter, Brent L.
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2017

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS workshop summarizes the transportation needs of TANF clients, evaluating the impact of Washington State’s Transportation Initiative for TANF Adults - a 2015-2016 pilot project that sought to expand transit options for TANF participants allowing more access to work-related activities. 

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS workshop summarizes the transportation needs of TANF clients, evaluating the impact of Washington State’s Transportation Initiative for TANF Adults - a 2015-2016 pilot project that sought to expand transit options for TANF participants allowing more access to work-related activities. 

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