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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Tambornino, John ; Crouse, Gilbert; Winston, Pamela
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    The federal Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program, which includes children under age 18 with disabilities from low-income households, has grown in recent decades. This research brief examines national trends in the child SSI program between 1991-2011 with a focus on the program’s reach and cost. It compares the child SSI program to other SSI program age groups and to other major federal safety net programs that serve children. The child SSI program remains the smallest of these federal safety net programs in terms of number of recipients, but federal expenditures for the program now exceed federal and state expenditures for Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) program cash benefits to children, which have declined in recent years. Future ASPE Research Briefs will examine state and county variation in child SSI program participation, and diverse policy and program environments in four states to identify factors that may influence program participation. (author abstract)

    The federal Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program, which includes children under age 18 with disabilities from low-income households, has grown in recent decades. This research brief examines national trends in the child SSI program between 1991-2011 with a focus on the program’s reach and cost. It compares the child SSI program to other SSI program age groups and to other major federal safety net programs that serve children. The child SSI program remains the smallest of these federal safety net programs in terms of number of recipients, but federal expenditures for the program now exceed federal and state expenditures for Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) program cash benefits to children, which have declined in recent years. Future ASPE Research Briefs will examine state and county variation in child SSI program participation, and diverse policy and program environments in four states to identify factors that may influence program participation. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: United States Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor & Pensions
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    America changed when the Americans with Disability Act was signed into law over twenty-four years ago. In 1990, the civil rights of people with disabilities that were fought for by disability advocates and their allies became the law of the land.

    With the passage of the ADA, people with disabilities were guaranteed the right to equal access to employment, state and local government services, commercial facilities and businesses, transportation, and telecommunications. This meant, for the first time in the history of the United States, that those with physical, mental, intellectual, sensory, and chronic health disabilities had the right to be able to enter a local courthouse, to be able to cross the street, to be able to attend a movie or baseball game, to be able to dine in a local restaurant, or to be considered for employment based on their skills and knowledge rather than to be dismissed from consideration because of their disability…

    However, for many of those with disabilities, two areas of American life have been stubbornly resistant to change: employment and...

    America changed when the Americans with Disability Act was signed into law over twenty-four years ago. In 1990, the civil rights of people with disabilities that were fought for by disability advocates and their allies became the law of the land.

    With the passage of the ADA, people with disabilities were guaranteed the right to equal access to employment, state and local government services, commercial facilities and businesses, transportation, and telecommunications. This meant, for the first time in the history of the United States, that those with physical, mental, intellectual, sensory, and chronic health disabilities had the right to be able to enter a local courthouse, to be able to cross the street, to be able to attend a movie or baseball game, to be able to dine in a local restaurant, or to be considered for employment based on their skills and knowledge rather than to be dismissed from consideration because of their disability…

    However, for many of those with disabilities, two areas of American life have been stubbornly resistant to change: employment and participation in the middle class. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Hoff, David
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    In public policy discussions, the intersection of disability with poverty and a lack of employment often goes unrecognized. Yet the reality is that if you are a person with a disability, you are much more likely than the average citizen to be: (a) unemployed; (b) poor; and (c) highly reliant on public benefit programs. Fortunately, a growing recognition of the seriousness of the issue is leading to solutions. (author abstract)

    In public policy discussions, the intersection of disability with poverty and a lack of employment often goes unrecognized. Yet the reality is that if you are a person with a disability, you are much more likely than the average citizen to be: (a) unemployed; (b) poor; and (c) highly reliant on public benefit programs. Fortunately, a growing recognition of the seriousness of the issue is leading to solutions. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Hossain, Farhana ; Baird, Peter ; Pardoe, Rachel
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    Many U.S. military veterans have mental and physical disabilities that can increase their risk of substance abuse, social isolation, unemployment, and homelessness. The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have made it urgently necessary to address these issues once again as the nation faces “the largest wave of returning veterans with disabilities in recent history.” One in four veterans of these conflicts reports a service-connected disability, and unemployment among the youngest subset of veterans is particularly high.

    Veterans with disabilities need quality programs to help them get on a path to work and reintegrate into their communities. But there is limited evidence about what interventions can effectively help them do so. Past research suggests that symptoms and impairments explain only a part of what prevents people with disabilities from working, and that people with disabilities’ own beliefs and attitudes about their conditions often keep them from gainful employment. Similarly, researchers at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) have suggested in personal...

    Many U.S. military veterans have mental and physical disabilities that can increase their risk of substance abuse, social isolation, unemployment, and homelessness. The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have made it urgently necessary to address these issues once again as the nation faces “the largest wave of returning veterans with disabilities in recent history.” One in four veterans of these conflicts reports a service-connected disability, and unemployment among the youngest subset of veterans is particularly high.

    Veterans with disabilities need quality programs to help them get on a path to work and reintegrate into their communities. But there is limited evidence about what interventions can effectively help them do so. Past research suggests that symptoms and impairments explain only a part of what prevents people with disabilities from working, and that people with disabilities’ own beliefs and attitudes about their conditions often keep them from gainful employment. Similarly, researchers at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) have suggested in personal interviews that disabled veterans’ attitudes and beliefs about disability present at least as big a barrier to their ability to return to work as their actual physical or mental conditions.

    Drawing on its experience in disability, behavioral, and employment research, MDRC began testing the Progressive Goal Attainment Program (PGAP) for Veterans in 2012, in collaboration with the VA Connecticut Healthcare System. PGAP is a behavioral intervention for people struggling with a wide range of physical and mental health conditions. The program complements clinical services for the treatment of disabilities by specifically targeting psychological and social behaviors that contribute to pain, disability, and inactivity. The goal is to help those with disabilities resume daily activities and get them on a path to work.

    The PGAP demonstration in the VA Connecticut Healthcare System was designed to explore how feasible it is to implement the program in a veteran service setting. In the coming year MDRC will also test PGAP for Veterans in several locations in Houston, Texas, including the VA hospital and two local community providers. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Osilla, Karen O.; Van Busum, Kristin R.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    As large numbers of service members and veterans, many with serious injuries, return from Iraq and Afghanistan, it is critical to examine the types of return-to-work resources available to help wounded warriors obtain and retain gainful employment and to understand the effectiveness of these programs. RAND researchers examined existing return-to-work policies and programs for military men and women with service-related injuries and conducted an initial review of the available literature on return-to-work resources, focusing when possible on policies and programs specifically available for service members and veterans with physical injuries. The Department of Defense and the Department of Veterans Affairs should seek to build the evidence base concerning return-to-work programs, in order to understand which programs are most effective, which provide a return on investment, and what strategies are needed to encourage service members and veterans to utilize them (e.g., coordination). The DoD and the VA have been and will continue to be held accountable for the...

    As large numbers of service members and veterans, many with serious injuries, return from Iraq and Afghanistan, it is critical to examine the types of return-to-work resources available to help wounded warriors obtain and retain gainful employment and to understand the effectiveness of these programs. RAND researchers examined existing return-to-work policies and programs for military men and women with service-related injuries and conducted an initial review of the available literature on return-to-work resources, focusing when possible on policies and programs specifically available for service members and veterans with physical injuries. The Department of Defense and the Department of Veterans Affairs should seek to build the evidence base concerning return-to-work programs, in order to understand which programs are most effective, which provide a return on investment, and what strategies are needed to encourage service members and veterans to utilize them (e.g., coordination). The DoD and the VA have been and will continue to be held accountable for the successful reintegration of service members and veterans who have been injured while serving. (author abstract)

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