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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Child Care Aware of America
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    More than 11 million children younger than age five are in some form of child care in the United States. The Parents and the High Cost of Child Care: 2016 Report summarizes the cost of child care across the country, examines the importance of child care as a workforce support and as an early learning program, and explores the effect of high costs on families' child care options. This year's report continues to expose child care as one of the most significant expenses in a family budget, often exceeding the cost of housing, college tuition, transportation, or food. In addition to our review of the average cost of care across the nation, Child Care Aware® of America examined county-level data in four states. We also provide a comprehensive set of solutions and policy recommendations to help address the high cost of child care for families across the country. (Author abstract)

    More than 11 million children younger than age five are in some form of child care in the United States. The Parents and the High Cost of Child Care: 2016 Report summarizes the cost of child care across the country, examines the importance of child care as a workforce support and as an early learning program, and explores the effect of high costs on families' child care options. This year's report continues to expose child care as one of the most significant expenses in a family budget, often exceeding the cost of housing, college tuition, transportation, or food. In addition to our review of the average cost of care across the nation, Child Care Aware® of America examined county-level data in four states. We also provide a comprehensive set of solutions and policy recommendations to help address the high cost of child care for families across the country. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Adams, Gina; Katz, Michael
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    This report summarizes findings from a review of Massachusetts’ child care subsidy eligibility policies and implementation practices. The review included interviews and focus groups with approximately 60 experts and stakeholders with a broad range of perspectives on the system. It identifies several important issues that, if addressed, could improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the subsidized child care system. Such reforms would help fill in some of the gaps in the current policy framework, which has many strong components. This review is one component of a legislatively mandated assessment of the Massachusetts subsidized child care system. (author abstract)

    This report summarizes findings from a review of Massachusetts’ child care subsidy eligibility policies and implementation practices. The review included interviews and focus groups with approximately 60 experts and stakeholders with a broad range of perspectives on the system. It identifies several important issues that, if addressed, could improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the subsidized child care system. Such reforms would help fill in some of the gaps in the current policy framework, which has many strong components. This review is one component of a legislatively mandated assessment of the Massachusetts subsidized child care system. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Isaacs, Julia B.; Katz, Michael
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    This report summarizes a review aimed at helping the Massachusetts Department of Early Education and Care (EEC) more efficiently manage annual appropriations from multiple budgetary accounts that fund child care services. It combines an analysis of the spending history of these accounts, a review of current forecasting models, and information from key stakeholders and staff. The report concludes with suggestions for EEC to consider as it continues to improve its management of spending on subsidized child care. It is the first of several products prepared as part of a legislatively mandated assessment of the state’s subsidized child care system. (author abstract)

    This report summarizes a review aimed at helping the Massachusetts Department of Early Education and Care (EEC) more efficiently manage annual appropriations from multiple budgetary accounts that fund child care services. It combines an analysis of the spending history of these accounts, a review of current forecasting models, and information from key stakeholders and staff. The report concludes with suggestions for EEC to consider as it continues to improve its management of spending on subsidized child care. It is the first of several products prepared as part of a legislatively mandated assessment of the state’s subsidized child care system. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Washington, Valora; Reed, Mary
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2008

    This ethnographic case study of the Massachusetts voucher system tests the belief that demand subsidies increase choice and purchasing power for working poor families while improving the quality of care for children. Using multiple methodologies, we examined vouchers’ impact on parents, child care providers, and resource and referral agencies. All participants recognized the value of the subsidy. Yet low reimbursement rates forced providers to subsidize the system; many limited or refused vouchers. Providers and families had a strong bond; each was often overwhelmed by and suspicious of voucher administration. Children experienced discontinuity of care. Underresourced, resource and referral agencies struggle to balance a dual mission of service and policing. Specific policy recommendations were suggested, and adopted, in Massachusetts. (author abstract)

    This ethnographic case study of the Massachusetts voucher system tests the belief that demand subsidies increase choice and purchasing power for working poor families while improving the quality of care for children. Using multiple methodologies, we examined vouchers’ impact on parents, child care providers, and resource and referral agencies. All participants recognized the value of the subsidy. Yet low reimbursement rates forced providers to subsidize the system; many limited or refused vouchers. Providers and families had a strong bond; each was often overwhelmed by and suspicious of voucher administration. Children experienced discontinuity of care. Underresourced, resource and referral agencies struggle to balance a dual mission of service and policing. Specific policy recommendations were suggested, and adopted, in Massachusetts. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Snyder, Kathleen ; Bernstein, Sara ; Koralek, Robin
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2006

    Child care subsidies are an important support service for families moving from welfare to work. The connections between child care and work, and the work oriented focus within the welfare system since welfare reform, have increased the need for links between the welfare-to-work and child care subsidy systems to ensure families receiving TANF and moving off TANF are connected to child care subsidies. This paper summarizes findings from the third phase of the study. It is based on focus groups conducted in four locations in 2003 with current TANF participants and parents who had left TANF within the past year and were receiving child care subsidies. The report examines how these parents accessed and retained child care subsidies as they moved through and off welfare. However, it is important to note that this study did not examine the experiences of families that were not using subsidies. As a consequence, this study provides important information to help us better understand how these systems and polices work for families in the system, but it does not represent the perspectives...

    Child care subsidies are an important support service for families moving from welfare to work. The connections between child care and work, and the work oriented focus within the welfare system since welfare reform, have increased the need for links between the welfare-to-work and child care subsidy systems to ensure families receiving TANF and moving off TANF are connected to child care subsidies. This paper summarizes findings from the third phase of the study. It is based on focus groups conducted in four locations in 2003 with current TANF participants and parents who had left TANF within the past year and were receiving child care subsidies. The report examines how these parents accessed and retained child care subsidies as they moved through and off welfare. However, it is important to note that this study did not examine the experiences of families that were not using subsidies. As a consequence, this study provides important information to help us better understand how these systems and polices work for families in the system, but it does not represent the perspectives of families that were unsuccessful in navigating these systems. (author abstract)

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