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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Gelatt, Julia; Koball, Heather
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    The Immigrant Access to Health and Human Services project describes the legal and policy contexts that affect immigrant access to health and human services. The study aims to identify and describe federal, state, and local program eligibility provisions related to immigrants, major barriers to immigrants’ access to health and human services for which they are legally eligible, and innovative or promising practices that can help states manage their programs. This final report summarizes findings from the seven research briefs and one report that constitute this project. (author abstract)

    The Immigrant Access to Health and Human Services project describes the legal and policy contexts that affect immigrant access to health and human services. The study aims to identify and describe federal, state, and local program eligibility provisions related to immigrants, major barriers to immigrants’ access to health and human services for which they are legally eligible, and innovative or promising practices that can help states manage their programs. This final report summarizes findings from the seven research briefs and one report that constitute this project. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Firgens, Emily; Matthews, Hannah
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    The Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG), the largest source of federal funding for child care assistance available to states, provides low-income families with help paying for child care. Studies have shown that low-income LEP (limited English proficient), as well as immigrant families, are less likely to receive child care assistance. Under CCDBG, every two years states are required to submit plans describing how they will use CCDBG funds to help low-income families access child care and improve the quality of child care for all children. The most recent set of CCDBG state plans for FFY 2012-2013 offer insight into how states' activities and policies are targeted toward LEP and immigrant families, children, and providers. The newly revised State Plan includes sets of questions covering state strategies for serving LEP families. This paper provides summaries of state responses to questions about engaging with LEP families and providers and better serving them through state child care assistance programs. Information in this paper is not meant to be representative of...

    The Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG), the largest source of federal funding for child care assistance available to states, provides low-income families with help paying for child care. Studies have shown that low-income LEP (limited English proficient), as well as immigrant families, are less likely to receive child care assistance. Under CCDBG, every two years states are required to submit plans describing how they will use CCDBG funds to help low-income families access child care and improve the quality of child care for all children. The most recent set of CCDBG state plans for FFY 2012-2013 offer insight into how states' activities and policies are targeted toward LEP and immigrant families, children, and providers. The newly revised State Plan includes sets of questions covering state strategies for serving LEP families. This paper provides summaries of state responses to questions about engaging with LEP families and providers and better serving them through state child care assistance programs. Information in this paper is not meant to be representative of all state initiatives toward these groups. They recognize that some states may be conducting initiatives either through CCDBG funding or other funding sources, but may not have explicitly mentioned these activities within their FFY 2012-2013 plan. While details are limited, the state-reported activities provide an outline of the current and future activities states plan to undertake to support LEP families, children, and providers in accessing and providing high-quality child care. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Baum, Sandy; Flores M., Stella
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2011

    The increasing role that immigrants and their children, especially those from Latin America, are playing in American society, Sandy Baum and Stella Flores argue, makes it essential that as many young newcomers as possible enroll and succeed in postsecondary education.

    Immigrant youths from some countries find the doors to the nation's colleges wide open. But other groups, such as those from Latin America, Laos, and Cambodia, often fail to get a postsecondary education. Immigration status itself is not a hindrance. The characteristics of the immigrants, such as their country of origin, race, and parental socioeconomic status, in addition to the communities, schools, and legal barriers that greet them in the United States, explain most of that variation.

    Postsecondary attainment rates of young people who come from low-income households and, regardless of income or immigration status, whose parents have no college experience are low across the board. Exacerbating the financial constraints is the reality that low-income students and those whose parents have little...

    The increasing role that immigrants and their children, especially those from Latin America, are playing in American society, Sandy Baum and Stella Flores argue, makes it essential that as many young newcomers as possible enroll and succeed in postsecondary education.

    Immigrant youths from some countries find the doors to the nation's colleges wide open. But other groups, such as those from Latin America, Laos, and Cambodia, often fail to get a postsecondary education. Immigration status itself is not a hindrance. The characteristics of the immigrants, such as their country of origin, race, and parental socioeconomic status, in addition to the communities, schools, and legal barriers that greet them in the United States, explain most of that variation.

    Postsecondary attainment rates of young people who come from low-income households and, regardless of income or immigration status, whose parents have no college experience are low across the board. Exacerbating the financial constraints is the reality that low-income students and those whose parents have little education are frequently ill prepared academically to succeed in college.

    The sharp rise in demand for skilled labor over the past few decades has made it more urgent than ever to provide access to postsecondary education for all. And policy solutions, say the authors, require researchers to better understand the differences among immigrant groups.

    Removing barriers to education and to employment opportunities for undocumented students poses political, not conceptual, problems. Providing adequate funding for postsecondary education through low tuition and grant aid is also straightforward, if not easy to accomplish. Assuring that Mexican immigrants and others who grow up in low-income communities have the opportunity to prepare themselves academically for college is more challenging. Policies to improve the elementary and secondary school experiences of all children are key to improving the postsecondary success of all. (author summary)

  • Individual Author: Skinner, Curtis
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2011

    This descriptive report identifies traits among low-income, immigrant families that may bear on SNAP participation rates and suggests ways in which state program administrators can improve their outreach and other administrative procedures to better reach these needy families. Drawing on household data from the 2009 American Community Survey and administrative data from the SNAP program, the analysis compares selected demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of immigrant families participating and not participating in the SNAP program with those of native families. The report examines federal and state efforts to improve take-up and concludes with policy recommendations for state program administrators to raise program participation among immigrant families with children. (Author introduction)

    This descriptive report identifies traits among low-income, immigrant families that may bear on SNAP participation rates and suggests ways in which state program administrators can improve their outreach and other administrative procedures to better reach these needy families. Drawing on household data from the 2009 American Community Survey and administrative data from the SNAP program, the analysis compares selected demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of immigrant families participating and not participating in the SNAP program with those of native families. The report examines federal and state efforts to improve take-up and concludes with policy recommendations for state program administrators to raise program participation among immigrant families with children. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Dinan, Kinsey Alden
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2005

    About 20 percent of this country’s children—nearly 17 million—have at least one foreign-born parent. These children are more likely to be low income and to experience other hardships than children with native-born parents. Altogether, children of immigrants comprise more than 26 percent of all low-income children in the United States. However, they are less likely than other children to benefit from government programs designed to assist low-income families.

    The federal government sets U.S. immigration policies that regulate the flow of immigrants into the United States. The federal government also bears primary responsibility for immigrant policies that determine the treatment of immigrants within the nation, although in recent years much of this responsibility has been shifted onto the states. Both types of policies have important implications for the economic security of immigrant families and set the context for state and local policy choices regarding immigrant children and their families.

    This brief is the first in a series that explores key policy issues...

    About 20 percent of this country’s children—nearly 17 million—have at least one foreign-born parent. These children are more likely to be low income and to experience other hardships than children with native-born parents. Altogether, children of immigrants comprise more than 26 percent of all low-income children in the United States. However, they are less likely than other children to benefit from government programs designed to assist low-income families.

    The federal government sets U.S. immigration policies that regulate the flow of immigrants into the United States. The federal government also bears primary responsibility for immigrant policies that determine the treatment of immigrants within the nation, although in recent years much of this responsibility has been shifted onto the states. Both types of policies have important implications for the economic security of immigrant families and set the context for state and local policy choices regarding immigrant children and their families.

    This brief is the first in a series that explores key policy issues related to children in low-income immigrant families. It provides an overview of federal policies that affect immigrant families’ access to key income and employment supports. (author abstract)

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