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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Shattuck, Rachel M.
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2017

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS workshop discusses the likelihood of low-income children who received federal Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) - subsidized care in early childhood - being held back in school, from kindergarten onward. Additionally, this presentation explores whether this association is particularly pronounced for low-income Black and Hispanic children relative to low-income children from other race/ethnic groups.

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS workshop discusses the likelihood of low-income children who received federal Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) - subsidized care in early childhood - being held back in school, from kindergarten onward. Additionally, this presentation explores whether this association is particularly pronounced for low-income Black and Hispanic children relative to low-income children from other race/ethnic groups.

  • Individual Author: Hahn, Heather; Isaacs, Julia; Wagner, Jennifer; Forster, Hilary
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2016

    This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS) describes the Work Support Strategies (WSS) initiative and reviews outcomes and implementation experiences from the multistate evaluation. WSS is designed to streamline the delivery of work supports to eligible families.

    This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS) describes the Work Support Strategies (WSS) initiative and reviews outcomes and implementation experiences from the multistate evaluation. WSS is designed to streamline the delivery of work supports to eligible families.

  • Individual Author: Pakulak, Eric; Bell, Theodore A.; Giuliano, Ryan; Gomsrud, Melissa; Karns, Christina; Klein, Scott; Longoria, Zayra; O'Neill, Lauren; Neville, Helen
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2015

    ...Guided by evidence of the neuroplasticity of systems supporting stress regulation, selective attention, and self-regulation, as well as by evidence from successful parenting programs (e.g., Reid et al., 1999), we developed a two-generation intervention that targets attention and self-regulation in preschool children by engaging the broader context of parents and the home environment. The child component of the curriculum is delivered in the classroom, and the parent component is offered in eight weekly two-hour meetings midway through the school year. Child and parent training programs are integrated via an overarching emphasis on child attention, self-regulation, and emotional regulation and via explicit links in the parent program to child learning activities. We have shown that, relative to two comparison groups, parents in the program demonstrate reduced parenting stress, and children in the program display significant improvements in cognition, parent-reported child behaviors, and brain functions supporting selective attention (Neville et al., 2013).

    Our current...

    ...Guided by evidence of the neuroplasticity of systems supporting stress regulation, selective attention, and self-regulation, as well as by evidence from successful parenting programs (e.g., Reid et al., 1999), we developed a two-generation intervention that targets attention and self-regulation in preschool children by engaging the broader context of parents and the home environment. The child component of the curriculum is delivered in the classroom, and the parent component is offered in eight weekly two-hour meetings midway through the school year. Child and parent training programs are integrated via an overarching emphasis on child attention, self-regulation, and emotional regulation and via explicit links in the parent program to child learning activities. We have shown that, relative to two comparison groups, parents in the program demonstrate reduced parenting stress, and children in the program display significant improvements in cognition, parent-reported child behaviors, and brain functions supporting selective attention (Neville et al., 2013).

    Our current project builds on a ten-year program-research partnership with Head Start of Lane County, Oregon. As part of the study, children in 20 classrooms across seven sites are randomly assigned to receive either the two-generation intervention, Creating Connections (CC), or Head Start-as-usual, enabling us to test the hypothesis that children and parents receiving CC will show improvements in in stress physiology, brain functions for attention, and self-regulation. This paper describes preliminary findings based on the first cohort of CC participants (N = 48). We measure stress physiology and brain function for attention and self-regulation in both children and parents before and after implementation of the parent component, in addition to longer-term measures of broader outcomes. Because stress and self-regulation are related to multiple outcomes, we hypothesize that short-term changes in these systems will lead to broader, longer-term improvements in family well-being (e.g., Shonkoff, 2012). Results supporting this hypothesis would provide evidence that investments in two-generation interventions that target self-regulation in children and parents from lower SES backgrounds may produce benefits that extend beyond improvements in school readiness. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Weber, Roberta B.; Grobe, Deana; Davis, Elizabeth E.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2014

    A dramatic change in the generosity of one state's child care subsidy policy provides an opportunity to study the relationship between subsidy policy generosity and program outcomes. We find positive effects of policy generosity on child care usage and continuity in the program. We also find these outcomes affected by employment characteristics of participating parents. Unstable employment as evidenced by frequent employment losses, job changes, and periods of unemployment, challenge the ability of a parent to remain in a program tightly linked to being employed. Generosity of subsidy policy is positively related to achievement of Child Care and Development Fund program goals of continuity and parental access to care that meets the developmental needs of their child. (author abstract)

    A dramatic change in the generosity of one state's child care subsidy policy provides an opportunity to study the relationship between subsidy policy generosity and program outcomes. We find positive effects of policy generosity on child care usage and continuity in the program. We also find these outcomes affected by employment characteristics of participating parents. Unstable employment as evidenced by frequent employment losses, job changes, and periods of unemployment, challenge the ability of a parent to remain in a program tightly linked to being employed. Generosity of subsidy policy is positively related to achievement of Child Care and Development Fund program goals of continuity and parental access to care that meets the developmental needs of their child. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Weber, Bobbie; Vorpagel, Becky
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    Every two years the Oregon Child Care Research Partnership takes a snapshot of how well Oregon's child care and education system is serving children and families. Child Care and Education in Oregon and Its Counties describes how the system is working through state and county profiles. The report links study findings to Oregon's principal child care benchmarks: affordability, availability, and quality. (author abstract)

    Every two years the Oregon Child Care Research Partnership takes a snapshot of how well Oregon's child care and education system is serving children and families. Child Care and Education in Oregon and Its Counties describes how the system is working through state and county profiles. The report links study findings to Oregon's principal child care benchmarks: affordability, availability, and quality. (author abstract)

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