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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Speanburg, Katie; Juras, Randall; Patel, Amar; Schneider, Glen
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    The road to employment and economic self-sufficiency is considerably steeper for those youth who face some type of physical, sensory, cognitive, mental health, or other disability. The U. S. Department of Labor is actively addressing the needs and interests of individuals with disabilities through policy guidance, research, staffing and program support as well as technical assistance and training. The Department conducted a study to examine the public workforce system’s current efforts to serve youth with disabilities. The study profiles the implementation of various practices intended to support this effort and identifies factors that may pose barriers to the provision of targeted services. Additionally, the study provides recommendations to help shape future programs, policies, technical assistance and research initiatives related to serving youth with disabilities. 

    The cornerstone of this research is a survey of representatives from LWIBs on a range of topics relating to serving youth with disabilities. The data were gathered via an on line survey and completed by 69...

    The road to employment and economic self-sufficiency is considerably steeper for those youth who face some type of physical, sensory, cognitive, mental health, or other disability. The U. S. Department of Labor is actively addressing the needs and interests of individuals with disabilities through policy guidance, research, staffing and program support as well as technical assistance and training. The Department conducted a study to examine the public workforce system’s current efforts to serve youth with disabilities. The study profiles the implementation of various practices intended to support this effort and identifies factors that may pose barriers to the provision of targeted services. Additionally, the study provides recommendations to help shape future programs, policies, technical assistance and research initiatives related to serving youth with disabilities. 

    The cornerstone of this research is a survey of representatives from LWIBs on a range of topics relating to serving youth with disabilities. The data were gathered via an on line survey and completed by 69 percent of the LWIB Executive Directors or designees. This report presents a summary of the survey results. In addition to gathering general perspectives and challenges inherent in serving youth with disabilities, the analyses examined the extent to which LWIBs: (1) use customized assessments to identify participant needs and develop service plans; (2) provide training to build staff capacity to better serve this population; (3) expand their resource base through partnerships and combining funding streams; (4) actively target the out-of-school population of youth with disabilities; and (5) provide employment and community service opportunities.

    This study is the first to describe the programmatic and environmental context that shapes the provision of services to youth with disabilities by the workforce development system at the local level. Gathering first hand insights from practitioners provides important information that can be used to improve policy and practices for this population. (author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Corcoran, Mary; Heflin, Colleen
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2003

    This article describes how current and former welfare recipients receiving housing assistance differ from those not receiving assistance on various potential barriers to employment. The authors evaluate whether housing-assisted welfare recipients have different welfare and employment outcomes compared with unassisted welfare recipients. They examine eight outcomes: whether employed, whether on welfare, whether sanctioned, whether left a job, months on welfare, months employed, the number of hours worked, and the natural log of wages. They find more similarities than differences between women who receive housing assistance. In the authors’ multivariate analysis, they find housing assistance is not associated with the probability of receiving welfare or being sanctioned for noncompliance with the work requirement. Additionally, they find that support for the relationship between housing assistance and work outcomes is weak. Housing assistance has no effect on the probability of being employed, the natural log of weekly earnings, the percentage of months observed working, or the...

    This article describes how current and former welfare recipients receiving housing assistance differ from those not receiving assistance on various potential barriers to employment. The authors evaluate whether housing-assisted welfare recipients have different welfare and employment outcomes compared with unassisted welfare recipients. They examine eight outcomes: whether employed, whether on welfare, whether sanctioned, whether left a job, months on welfare, months employed, the number of hours worked, and the natural log of wages. They find more similarities than differences between women who receive housing assistance. In the authors’ multivariate analysis, they find housing assistance is not associated with the probability of receiving welfare or being sanctioned for noncompliance with the work requirement. Additionally, they find that support for the relationship between housing assistance and work outcomes is weak. Housing assistance has no effect on the probability of being employed, the natural log of weekly earnings, the percentage of months observed working, or the percentage of months observed receiving welfare. The authors find weak support for the role of vouchers in fostering attachment with employers and the role of public housing residence in increasing the number of hours worked on all jobs. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: U.S. Government Accountability Office
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2001

    The Congress passed PRWORA in 1996, making sweeping changes to national welfare policy. The act replaces the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) program with TANF block grants, a fixed federal funding stream that provides states the flexibility to design their own programs and strategies for promoting work and self-sufficiency. Under TANF there are strong work requirements for recipients and there is a limit on the number of months (60) that families can receive federally funded TANF benefits. The number of families receiving cash assistance has declined dramatically in recent years. More than 5 million families received cash assistance in 1994 but, as the economy improved and TANF work enforcement gathered steam, fewer families received assistance. Caseloads have fallen dramatically since the act went into effect, from 4.4 million families in August 1996 to 2.2 families in June 2000. Caseload declines slowed towards the end of 1999 and in a few states rose slightly, but the most recent data available from HHS indicate that, nationally, caseloads continue to decline....

    The Congress passed PRWORA in 1996, making sweeping changes to national welfare policy. The act replaces the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) program with TANF block grants, a fixed federal funding stream that provides states the flexibility to design their own programs and strategies for promoting work and self-sufficiency. Under TANF there are strong work requirements for recipients and there is a limit on the number of months (60) that families can receive federally funded TANF benefits. The number of families receiving cash assistance has declined dramatically in recent years. More than 5 million families received cash assistance in 1994 but, as the economy improved and TANF work enforcement gathered steam, fewer families received assistance. Caseloads have fallen dramatically since the act went into effect, from 4.4 million families in August 1996 to 2.2 families in June 2000. Caseload declines slowed towards the end of 1999 and in a few states rose slightly, but the most recent data available from HHS indicate that, nationally, caseloads continue to decline. Though there are no supporting data, many assume that as caseloads have fallen the composition of the caseload has changed. Specifically, some have speculated that those TANF recipients who could easily find and keep jobs have left the rolls, and hard-to-employ recipients-those with characteristics that interfere with employment-comprise an increasing share of the remaining cash assistance recipients. As a result, there is some concern that state programs that may have been effective at moving easier-to-employ recipients into the workforce may not meet the needs of those remaining on the rolls. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Lacombe, Annalynn
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1998

    This study uses a geographic information system (GIS) to assess mobility for the recipients living in the City of Boston. Although the scope and specific nature of the mobility problem vary considerably among U.S. cities, Boston presents a good case study for older Frostbelt cities with mature central areas and well-developed transit systems. 

    This study has three objectives: 

    1. Determine recipients' overall access to transit service.

    2. Estimate where in the metropolitan area recipients are likely to find work and determine these potential employers' proximity to transit.

    3. Ascertain how well mass transit in Boston connects welfare recipients and employers and thus meets recipients' mobility needs. 

    This study did not address other key mobility considerations, such as the locations of day care centers and other services upon which working mothers rely. 

    This report profiles the recipient population nationwide and describes their most significant mobility challenges, namely, the transportation demands of single parenthood and the...

    This study uses a geographic information system (GIS) to assess mobility for the recipients living in the City of Boston. Although the scope and specific nature of the mobility problem vary considerably among U.S. cities, Boston presents a good case study for older Frostbelt cities with mature central areas and well-developed transit systems. 

    This study has three objectives: 

    1. Determine recipients' overall access to transit service.

    2. Estimate where in the metropolitan area recipients are likely to find work and determine these potential employers' proximity to transit.

    3. Ascertain how well mass transit in Boston connects welfare recipients and employers and thus meets recipients' mobility needs. 

    This study did not address other key mobility considerations, such as the locations of day care centers and other services upon which working mothers rely. 

    This report profiles the recipient population nationwide and describes their most significant mobility challenges, namely, the transportation demands of single parenthood and the changing spatial patterns of employment. It also looks at the spatial distribution and key characteristics of TANF recipients in Boston, and assesses recipients' job opportunities and the location of potential employers. It provides an analysis of recipients' access to jobs and of transit system performance, and presents key conclusions and suggests areas for future analysis. (author introduction)

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