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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Varghese, Rebecca
    Reference Type: Thesis
    Year: 2016

    This paper first examines the framework of TANF. This informs the kinds of hurdles an individual, particularly a domestic violence victim, must overcome to be considered eligible for TANF benefits, and the difficulties in obtaining a TANF appointment while trying to successfully and permanently exit an abusive relationship. Because of the administrative and bureaucratic difficulties at this step, many victims will find that the difficulties outweigh potential TANF benefits, which are deliberately non-viable wages. Second, for those who have managed to maneuver these barriers, certain TANF requirements are exceptionally difficult to meet for domestic violence victims, a population that is at a significantly higher risk for abuse. Compliance with these requirements is often mandatory in order to continue receiving benefits. Disjointed FVO programs from state to state (even county to county) may force an abuse victim to remain in the same state in order to prevent revocation of benefits because of non-compliance. During this process, the greatest and potentially life-saving benefit...

    This paper first examines the framework of TANF. This informs the kinds of hurdles an individual, particularly a domestic violence victim, must overcome to be considered eligible for TANF benefits, and the difficulties in obtaining a TANF appointment while trying to successfully and permanently exit an abusive relationship. Because of the administrative and bureaucratic difficulties at this step, many victims will find that the difficulties outweigh potential TANF benefits, which are deliberately non-viable wages. Second, for those who have managed to maneuver these barriers, certain TANF requirements are exceptionally difficult to meet for domestic violence victims, a population that is at a significantly higher risk for abuse. Compliance with these requirements is often mandatory in order to continue receiving benefits. Disjointed FVO programs from state to state (even county to county) may force an abuse victim to remain in the same state in order to prevent revocation of benefits because of non-compliance. During this process, the greatest and potentially life-saving benefit to a victim may be the presence of an advocate who is confidential, independent, and trustworthy. Third, underutilization of the FVO is examined and modifications are considered. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Moffett, Erin
    Reference Type: Thesis
    Year: 2016

    Childhood obesity is a serious crisis in the United States and is disproportionately affecting minorities. Compared to only 28.5% of white adolescents, 38.9% of Hispanic adolescents are overweight or obese indicating a need for immediate action. As parents are the primary decision makers of their children’s dietary intakes, it is necessary to understand what food choices parents are making for themselves and their children and what factors are influencing this relationship. As part of a larger cross-sectional study, this investigation aimed to understand the dietary intakes of 31 Hispanic mother-child dyads in Southern Chester County Pennsylvania. Twenty-four hour dietary recalls were used to measure dietary intakes among the population and bivariate analysis and regression modeling methods were used to assess the relationship between mother and child diet. The dietary intakes and mother-child diet similarity were then examined with respect to acculturation, food security, and participation in food assistance programs. Consistent with previous findings, Hispanic children and...

    Childhood obesity is a serious crisis in the United States and is disproportionately affecting minorities. Compared to only 28.5% of white adolescents, 38.9% of Hispanic adolescents are overweight or obese indicating a need for immediate action. As parents are the primary decision makers of their children’s dietary intakes, it is necessary to understand what food choices parents are making for themselves and their children and what factors are influencing this relationship. As part of a larger cross-sectional study, this investigation aimed to understand the dietary intakes of 31 Hispanic mother-child dyads in Southern Chester County Pennsylvania. Twenty-four hour dietary recalls were used to measure dietary intakes among the population and bivariate analysis and regression modeling methods were used to assess the relationship between mother and child diet. The dietary intakes and mother-child diet similarity were then examined with respect to acculturation, food security, and participation in food assistance programs. Consistent with previous findings, Hispanic children and women were not meeting most recommended dietary intakes and are experiencing high rates of overweight and obesity, with 42% of children and 81% of mothers in this sample classified as overweight or obese. Overall, our study found that the diets of the mothers had minimal modeling effects on the diets of their children (majority of p > 0.05), and that the diets of the children were mainly constrained by food availability. Future interventions should focus on increasing access and availability of healthy foods to low income and immigrant families. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Martin, Erica
    Reference Type: Thesis
    Year: 2016

    Domestic violence is a vast social problem of considerable importance in the United States. It is more than a social problem; it is an economic problem as well due to the loss of productivity from abused victims. Based on a review of prior literature, a gap has been identified where virtually no spatial analysis has estimated accessibility or spatial matching of resources for victims of domestic violence. Accordingly, this paper will focus on analyzing if there is a spatial mismatch occurring between shelter resources and domestic violence victims, analyzing accessibility to these resources for victims, and on measuring the total cost or efficiency loss due to mismatches that are occurring.

    Strong links exist between rates of domestic violence and poverty, when combined with the shifting of the geography of poverty over the past decade, raises the question of whether resources are located efficiently and equitably to those in need. Since shelter locations are immobile it is important to analyze their distribution, especially since they place a key role in the outcomes for...

    Domestic violence is a vast social problem of considerable importance in the United States. It is more than a social problem; it is an economic problem as well due to the loss of productivity from abused victims. Based on a review of prior literature, a gap has been identified where virtually no spatial analysis has estimated accessibility or spatial matching of resources for victims of domestic violence. Accordingly, this paper will focus on analyzing if there is a spatial mismatch occurring between shelter resources and domestic violence victims, analyzing accessibility to these resources for victims, and on measuring the total cost or efficiency loss due to mismatches that are occurring.

    Strong links exist between rates of domestic violence and poverty, when combined with the shifting of the geography of poverty over the past decade, raises the question of whether resources are located efficiently and equitably to those in need. Since shelter locations are immobile it is important to analyze their distribution, especially since they place a key role in the outcomes for victims and in reducing costs associated with domestic violence.

    This research combines knowledge in economics with spatial analysis and Geographic Information System (GIS) capabilities, and offers an improved understanding of this contemporary social problem. Improved methodologies such as the Enhanced Two-Step Floating Catchment Area method as well as other spatial tools bring new insights to the issue. The policy implications can potentially improve the distribution of resources for domestic violence victims as well as guide public policy decisions regarding shelter placement and other social welfare resources. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Bailey, Andrea Leigh
    Reference Type: Thesis
    Year: 2015

    The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Economic Research Service estimates that 23.5 million people live in food deserts, over half of which are considered low-income residents. Accurately defining a food desert is crucial as the designated areas can benefit from grant opportunities and funding priority. To qualify as an urban food desert, the USDA requires that at least 500 residents or one-third of the population live outside a one-mile buffer from a supermarket as well as have a median income of less than 80% of the area average or a poverty rate of greater than 20%. Approaches in the literature to identify low accessibility areas (food deserts) include simple spatial analyses, travel cost models, grocery cost models, and activity-based models. Although using cost as a measure of access is beneficial, the travel cost components are ill-defined, especially for transit. Additionally, defining food deserts as a ratio of travel cost to median household income may more accurately reflect areas with poor accessibility to healthy food by utilizing a combined measure...

    The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Economic Research Service estimates that 23.5 million people live in food deserts, over half of which are considered low-income residents. Accurately defining a food desert is crucial as the designated areas can benefit from grant opportunities and funding priority. To qualify as an urban food desert, the USDA requires that at least 500 residents or one-third of the population live outside a one-mile buffer from a supermarket as well as have a median income of less than 80% of the area average or a poverty rate of greater than 20%. Approaches in the literature to identify low accessibility areas (food deserts) include simple spatial analyses, travel cost models, grocery cost models, and activity-based models. Although using cost as a measure of access is beneficial, the travel cost components are ill-defined, especially for transit. Additionally, defining food deserts as a ratio of travel cost to median household income may more accurately reflect areas with poor accessibility to healthy food by utilizing a combined measure instead of distinct income and access components.

    This paper develops a cost surface for auto, transit, and walking to determine the average travel cost to the nearest supermarket for each mode in Indianapolis using Spatial Analyst in ArcGIS 10.2. Given the results from ArcGIS, spatial lag models are used to model the proportion of household income spent on traveling to supermarkets as a function of socioeconomic variables. The results show that a higher crime density, no college degree, and living outside of I-465 are all correlated with poorer accessibility to healthy food. These explanatory variables had similar effects for driving and walking, but the transit network was less sensitive to education and crime and more location-dependent. For this study, working with the police department and community to reduce crime as well as expanding the transit network are both recommended as potential interventions. Results from this analysis can provide valuable insight into the reasons behind the existence of food deserts. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Rubio, Aouie
    Reference Type: Thesis
    Year: 2015

    Rubicon Programs transformed its programs through recent strategic planning efforts to address the change in their mission that refocuses their goal on the eradication of poverty. The challenge for the design team was reimagining with fresh eyes the organization’s programs and service delivery model by examining what is needed from a holistic approach to move individuals out of poverty; becoming self-sufficient without recidivating back to poverty levels. This focus on moving people out of poverty and increasing sustainable self-sufficiency and not simply finding employment adds a complex level of program design aspects to consider. It is important for the participant to obtain an entry-level job as well as develop and implement an employment plan that leads to a job that provides with a living wage and the flexibility of employment benefits. In addition to job readiness programming, the whole person approach includes time during the program design planning process to apply Freire’s critical consciousness theory and self-reflection to tease out the root causes of the individual’s...

    Rubicon Programs transformed its programs through recent strategic planning efforts to address the change in their mission that refocuses their goal on the eradication of poverty. The challenge for the design team was reimagining with fresh eyes the organization’s programs and service delivery model by examining what is needed from a holistic approach to move individuals out of poverty; becoming self-sufficient without recidivating back to poverty levels. This focus on moving people out of poverty and increasing sustainable self-sufficiency and not simply finding employment adds a complex level of program design aspects to consider. It is important for the participant to obtain an entry-level job as well as develop and implement an employment plan that leads to a job that provides with a living wage and the flexibility of employment benefits. In addition to job readiness programming, the whole person approach includes time during the program design planning process to apply Freire’s critical consciousness theory and self-reflection to tease out the root causes of the individual’s barriers to continuous positive employment. Rubicon Programs’ bold approach to addressing the issue of poverty through its collaborative and inclusive redesign approach to research and the development of programs demonstrates its commitment to leverage the strengths and voices of its team, program participants and community stakeholders. In addition to affirming many of the common barriers Rubicon’s team was all too familiar, the research findings created an awareness of the need to address learning disabilities as a barrier to employment and leaving poverty. (author abstract) 

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