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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Gultekin, Laura; Brush, Barbara L.; Baiardi, Janet M.; VanMaldeghem, Kelley
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    Homelessness threatens the health and well-being of thousands of families in the United States, yet little is known about their specific needs and how current services address them. To fill this knowledge gap, we explored the experiences of homelessness families in Detroit, Michigan. We targeted homeless mothers and their caseworkers for study to see if the perceptions of needs and services were in alignment. Using focus groups and content analysis, we identified four overarching themes that illustrate homeless mothers' experience with homelessness. We then analyzed data from caseworkers to look specifically for similarities and differences in their perceptions. Key findings included reports of family histories of violence, poverty, social isolation, and a lack of informal support as contributing to homelessness. The differing perspectives of mothers and their caseworkers regarding how best to move forward highlight how current programs and services may not be meeting the needs of this growing and vulnerable cohort. (Author abstract)

    Homelessness threatens the health and well-being of thousands of families in the United States, yet little is known about their specific needs and how current services address them. To fill this knowledge gap, we explored the experiences of homelessness families in Detroit, Michigan. We targeted homeless mothers and their caseworkers for study to see if the perceptions of needs and services were in alignment. Using focus groups and content analysis, we identified four overarching themes that illustrate homeless mothers' experience with homelessness. We then analyzed data from caseworkers to look specifically for similarities and differences in their perceptions. Key findings included reports of family histories of violence, poverty, social isolation, and a lack of informal support as contributing to homelessness. The differing perspectives of mothers and their caseworkers regarding how best to move forward highlight how current programs and services may not be meeting the needs of this growing and vulnerable cohort. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Burgard, Sarah A.; Kalousova, Lucie; Danziger, Sheldon; Seefeldt, Kristin S.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    The “Great Recession” that lasted from December 2007 through June 2009 was the most severe recession in recent decades. It lasted longer and resulted in more job losses than previous downturns, and an unusually large number of workers experienced long-term unemployment during this recession and the current slow recovery. Analyzing data from the 2008 Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP), which tracked households from mid-2008 through early 2011, Johnson and Feng (2013) found that most of the substantial increase in the unemployment rate was driven by a surge in multiple and extended jobless spells (lasting 6 months or more), rather than an increase in the likelihood of becoming unemployed at all. The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that 41 percent of the unemployed in 2012 had been without work for 27 weeks or more compared to only 17.6 percent prior to the recession.

    Long-term unemployment is associated with serious hardships. For example, levels of food insecurity increase as the unemployment rate rises (Nord and Carlson, 2009) as do levels of financial...

    The “Great Recession” that lasted from December 2007 through June 2009 was the most severe recession in recent decades. It lasted longer and resulted in more job losses than previous downturns, and an unusually large number of workers experienced long-term unemployment during this recession and the current slow recovery. Analyzing data from the 2008 Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP), which tracked households from mid-2008 through early 2011, Johnson and Feng (2013) found that most of the substantial increase in the unemployment rate was driven by a surge in multiple and extended jobless spells (lasting 6 months or more), rather than an increase in the likelihood of becoming unemployed at all. The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that 41 percent of the unemployed in 2012 had been without work for 27 weeks or more compared to only 17.6 percent prior to the recession.

    Long-term unemployment is associated with serious hardships. For example, levels of food insecurity increase as the unemployment rate rises (Nord and Carlson, 2009) as do levels of financial problems (Lovell and Oh, 2006). While we know about these broad associations between unemployment rates and rates of hardship across the population, prior studies typically have focused on one or just a few hardships. In this brief, we examine levels and correlates of long- term unemployment among working age adults in the Michigan and Recession and Recovery Study (MRRS). We also explore whether long-term unemployment was associated with higher levels of material hardship in four key domains: financial problems, housing instability, food insecurity, and foregone medical care. We examine these domains one at a time, and then consider the total burden of hardship across the four domains. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Zhang, Nanhua; Baker, Harolyn W.; Tufts, Margaret; Raymond, Randall E.; Salihu, Hamisu; Elliott, Micheal R.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    Objectives We assessed the long-term effect of early childhood lead exposure on academic achievement in mathematics, science, and reading among elementary and junior high school children.

    Methods We linked early childhood blood lead testing surveillance data from the Detroit Department of Health and Wellness Promotion to educational testing data from the Detroit, Michigan, public schools. We used the linked data to investigate the effect of early childhood lead exposure on academic achievement among school-aged children, both marginally and adjusted for grade level, gender, race, language, maternal education, and socioeconomic status.

    Results High blood lead levels before age 6 years were strongly associated with poor academic achievement in grades 3, 5, and 8. The odds of scoring less than proficient for those whose blood lead levels were greater than 10 micrograms per deciliter were more than twice the odds for those whose blood lead levels were less than 1 micrograms per deciliter after adjustment for potential...

    Objectives We assessed the long-term effect of early childhood lead exposure on academic achievement in mathematics, science, and reading among elementary and junior high school children.

    Methods We linked early childhood blood lead testing surveillance data from the Detroit Department of Health and Wellness Promotion to educational testing data from the Detroit, Michigan, public schools. We used the linked data to investigate the effect of early childhood lead exposure on academic achievement among school-aged children, both marginally and adjusted for grade level, gender, race, language, maternal education, and socioeconomic status.

    Results High blood lead levels before age 6 years were strongly associated with poor academic achievement in grades 3, 5, and 8. The odds of scoring less than proficient for those whose blood lead levels were greater than 10 micrograms per deciliter were more than twice the odds for those whose blood lead levels were less than 1 micrograms per deciliter after adjustment for potential confounders.

    Conclusions Early childhood lead exposure was negatively associated with academic achievement in elementary and junior high school, after adjusting for key potential confounders. The control of lead poisoning should focus on primary prevention of lead exposure in children and development of special education programs for students with lead poisoning. (Author Abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Burgard, Sarah; Seefeldt, Kristin; Zelner, Sarah
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    The Great Recession that began in December 2007 and lasted through June 2009 has drawn attention to the issue of housing instability, as the number of Americans who have lost their homes or moved for financial reasons has increased dramatically. The number of foreclosures alone increased 127 percent between 2007 and 2009, hitting a record high of 2.8 million. While the potential effects of housing instability are numerous, one important aspect is the consequences for health. Using new data from the Michigan Recession and Recovery Study (MRRS), a population-based sample of working-aged adults, we examine the association between many different types of housing instability and several measures of health.

    Our findings suggest the importance of distinguishing different types of housing instability and using appropriate risk groups and comparison categories, as well as considering characteristics such as human capital and prior housing and health problems, since housing instability may be a link on the pathway between these factors and subsequent health problems, rather than a...

    The Great Recession that began in December 2007 and lasted through June 2009 has drawn attention to the issue of housing instability, as the number of Americans who have lost their homes or moved for financial reasons has increased dramatically. The number of foreclosures alone increased 127 percent between 2007 and 2009, hitting a record high of 2.8 million. While the potential effects of housing instability are numerous, one important aspect is the consequences for health. Using new data from the Michigan Recession and Recovery Study (MRRS), a population-based sample of working-aged adults, we examine the association between many different types of housing instability and several measures of health.

    Our findings suggest the importance of distinguishing different types of housing instability and using appropriate risk groups and comparison categories, as well as considering characteristics such as human capital and prior housing and health problems, since housing instability may be a link on the pathway between these factors and subsequent health problems, rather than a cause itself for health decline. (author abstract)

    For additional information, please see the full article in the SSRC.

  • Individual Author: Kalil, Ariel; Leininger, Lindsey
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    The Great Recession and its aftermath represent a major social transformation in American life and understanding its consequences on children's health and behavior is vitally important. Researchers and policy makers have long been concerned that economic distress may negatively impact child well-being, in part through family stress and reduced investments in child health and development. However, evidence is scarce because most population-based studies do not include the necessary measures of child health and behavior, family economic conditions, and the potential mediators linking the two. Our new study—the Michigan Recession and Recovery Study Child and Youth Study (MRRS-CYS) represents an important addition to the literature and is one of the few representative studies that will allow us to track the health and well-being of a wide range of children in the aftermath of the Great Recession. In this policy brief, we present preliminary evidence from the first wave of data on children and youth and examine the prevalence of perceived economic hardship and its link with key...

    The Great Recession and its aftermath represent a major social transformation in American life and understanding its consequences on children's health and behavior is vitally important. Researchers and policy makers have long been concerned that economic distress may negatively impact child well-being, in part through family stress and reduced investments in child health and development. However, evidence is scarce because most population-based studies do not include the necessary measures of child health and behavior, family economic conditions, and the potential mediators linking the two. Our new study—the Michigan Recession and Recovery Study Child and Youth Study (MRRS-CYS) represents an important addition to the literature and is one of the few representative studies that will allow us to track the health and well-being of a wide range of children in the aftermath of the Great Recession. In this policy brief, we present preliminary evidence from the first wave of data on children and youth and examine the prevalence of perceived economic hardship and its link with key indicators of children's behavioral health, and their access to food and medical care, both of which may in turn affect health and behavior. (Author introduction)

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