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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Hahn, Andrew B.; Curnan, Susan P.; Bailis, Lawrence N.; Frees, Joseph; Kingsley, Christopher; LaCava, Lisa A.; Lanspery, Susan; Melchior, Alan L.; Moldow, Erika L.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2010

    On February 17, 2009, President Barack Obama signed the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act into law, providing $1.2 billion in targeted funding for the workforce investment system to generate employment and training opportunities for economically disadvantaged youth nationwide. Congress and the U.S. Department of Labor encouraged states and local workforce investment boards to use the funds to create meaningful work experiences for these young people in summer 2009.

    This report was prepared by the Center for Youth and Communities of the Heller School for Social Policy and Management at Brandeis University with a grant awarded by the Employment and Training Administration. The report documents the implementation of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act summer youth employment initiative in four featured communities: Chicago, Illinois; Detroit, Michigan; Indianapolis and Marion County, Indiana; Phoenix and Maricopa County, Arizona. The researchers conducted interviews and in-depth site visits over a two-week period in each community and developed individual case...

    On February 17, 2009, President Barack Obama signed the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act into law, providing $1.2 billion in targeted funding for the workforce investment system to generate employment and training opportunities for economically disadvantaged youth nationwide. Congress and the U.S. Department of Labor encouraged states and local workforce investment boards to use the funds to create meaningful work experiences for these young people in summer 2009.

    This report was prepared by the Center for Youth and Communities of the Heller School for Social Policy and Management at Brandeis University with a grant awarded by the Employment and Training Administration. The report documents the implementation of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act summer youth employment initiative in four featured communities: Chicago, Illinois; Detroit, Michigan; Indianapolis and Marion County, Indiana; Phoenix and Maricopa County, Arizona. The researchers conducted interviews and in-depth site visits over a two-week period in each community and developed individual case studies describing the recessionary challenges and strategies in the four communities during summer 2009. These four communities collectively received an infusion of more than $37 million and provided an estimated 16,650 summer jobs for low-income and disadvantaged youth. The report describes the local context for implementation, provides insight into specific assets and innovations that were used to achieve the community goals, and identifies elements of best practices and lessons that may inform future summer youth employment initiatives. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Thompson, Jeffery W.; Turner-Meikeljohn, Susan; Conway, Maureen
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2000

    This case study on Focus: HOPE is the fourth of six sectoral studies to provide an in-depth look at individual sectoral employment development programs and their interaction within distinct economic and industry environments. It explores HOPE, a Detroit civil rights organization with a highly developed machinist training program. Section 1 discusses its programs, historical events that led to its current structure, details of HOPE's sectoral strategies, and key relationships it has formed to achieve its objectives. Section 2 describes important features of the machinist-related occupations and industry that employs these workers. It discusses relationships between machine shops and competitive factors affecting the automotive industry. Section 3 focuses on how HOPE puts its sectoral strategies into practice, particularly how it interacts with and influences industry and other key educational and governmental entities to increase employment opportunities for the disadvantaged population. Section 4 reviews HOPE's core training program, the Machinist Training Institute (...

    This case study on Focus: HOPE is the fourth of six sectoral studies to provide an in-depth look at individual sectoral employment development programs and their interaction within distinct economic and industry environments. It explores HOPE, a Detroit civil rights organization with a highly developed machinist training program. Section 1 discusses its programs, historical events that led to its current structure, details of HOPE's sectoral strategies, and key relationships it has formed to achieve its objectives. Section 2 describes important features of the machinist-related occupations and industry that employs these workers. It discusses relationships between machine shops and competitive factors affecting the automotive industry. Section 3 focuses on how HOPE puts its sectoral strategies into practice, particularly how it interacts with and influences industry and other key educational and governmental entities to increase employment opportunities for the disadvantaged population. Section 4 reviews HOPE's core training program, the Machinist Training Institute (MTI), with training programs for disadvantaged people with a range of skills and educational backgrounds. It explains the content and approach of each training course and the services that provide outreach, recruitment, evaluation, and post-training placement assistance. Section 5 discusses outcomes associated with MTI's training, including ratios for graduation and placement rates, and costs. Section 6 reviews lessons learned and challenges HOPE faces. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Locke, Gretchen; Nolden, Sandra; Michlin, Naomi; Winkel, Kristin; Elwood, Paul
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2000

    This research addresses the issues facing non-elderly people with disabilities as they seek affordable housing in their communities. The primary focus of this exploratory research is the influence of provisions of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1992 that permitted owners of certain HUD-assisted elderly housing (which may have previously served non-elderly people with disabilities) to limit admissions to elderly households. This report presents case studies of ten purposively selected metropolitan areas and a cross-site analysis assessing the issues facing low-income, non-elderly people with disabilities who are seeking affordable housing. (author abstract)

    This research addresses the issues facing non-elderly people with disabilities as they seek affordable housing in their communities. The primary focus of this exploratory research is the influence of provisions of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1992 that permitted owners of certain HUD-assisted elderly housing (which may have previously served non-elderly people with disabilities) to limit admissions to elderly households. This report presents case studies of ten purposively selected metropolitan areas and a cross-site analysis assessing the issues facing low-income, non-elderly people with disabilities who are seeking affordable housing. (author abstract)

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