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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Weigensberg, Elizabeth; Needels, Karen; Gould-Werth, Alix; Patnaik, Ankita; Lee, Joanne
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This report for the Department of Labor examines Self-Employment Assistance (SEA) programs, which help qualifying unemployment insurance recipients set up a business in lieu of seeking a new job. In addition to providing a weekly self-employment allowance, SEA programs typically partnered with other organizations to provide participants with important business development supports, including counseling, mentoring, or training. Researchers examined states’ motivation for establishing SEA programs, states’ experiences with implementing a program, and outcomes of SEA participants and their businesses. (Author abstract)

    This report for the Department of Labor examines Self-Employment Assistance (SEA) programs, which help qualifying unemployment insurance recipients set up a business in lieu of seeking a new job. In addition to providing a weekly self-employment allowance, SEA programs typically partnered with other organizations to provide participants with important business development supports, including counseling, mentoring, or training. Researchers examined states’ motivation for establishing SEA programs, states’ experiences with implementing a program, and outcomes of SEA participants and their businesses. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Spillman, Brenda C.; Clemans-Cope, Lisa; Mallik-Kane, Kamala; Hayes, Emily
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Many states have expanded Medicaid eligibility to reach a wider array of vulnerable and historically uninsured populations. While Medicaid cannot pay for medical services provided in prisons or jails, people who are arrested and incarcerated can enroll in Medicaid and become eligible for benefits in the community. Given the high prevalence of mental health issues, substance abuse, and chronic health conditions among criminal justice populations, providing health care services to them could improve public health and public safety outcomes. This brief highlights initiatives in New York and Rhode Island that use the Medicaid health home model to improve continuity of care for justice-involved individuals. (Author abstract)

    Many states have expanded Medicaid eligibility to reach a wider array of vulnerable and historically uninsured populations. While Medicaid cannot pay for medical services provided in prisons or jails, people who are arrested and incarcerated can enroll in Medicaid and become eligible for benefits in the community. Given the high prevalence of mental health issues, substance abuse, and chronic health conditions among criminal justice populations, providing health care services to them could improve public health and public safety outcomes. This brief highlights initiatives in New York and Rhode Island that use the Medicaid health home model to improve continuity of care for justice-involved individuals. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Schwabish, Jonathan
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This brief examines correlates of DI benefit receipt for people with mental disorders, focusing on the higher rate of receipt in the six New England states. In 2015, 1.8 percent of all 18- to 65-year-olds across the country received DI benefits because of mental disorders. That recipiency rate was markedly higher in Maine, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont. The evidence suggests that access to and treatment from the health care system (which tend to be better in New England states) may help people identify their illnesses and contact the DI program and other services. (Author abstract)

    This brief examines correlates of DI benefit receipt for people with mental disorders, focusing on the higher rate of receipt in the six New England states. In 2015, 1.8 percent of all 18- to 65-year-olds across the country received DI benefits because of mental disorders. That recipiency rate was markedly higher in Maine, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont. The evidence suggests that access to and treatment from the health care system (which tend to be better in New England states) may help people identify their illnesses and contact the DI program and other services. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: James, Cemerè
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    Receipt of public work supports, such as nutrition assistance under the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), health insurance under Medicaid, and child care subsidies, can make a critical difference for low-income workers, stabilizing their employment and allowing them to meet their families’ basic needs. They also improve children’s long-term health and educational outcomes. Unfortunately, many families do not get the full package of work support benefits for which they are eligible. In 2011, about four in ten working households eligible for SNAP did not participate. Furthermore, the limited data available showed that families’ joint participation in Medicaid, SNAP and child care was very low compared to participation in any single program (less than 10 percent in some cases). (Author abstract)

    Receipt of public work supports, such as nutrition assistance under the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), health insurance under Medicaid, and child care subsidies, can make a critical difference for low-income workers, stabilizing their employment and allowing them to meet their families’ basic needs. They also improve children’s long-term health and educational outcomes. Unfortunately, many families do not get the full package of work support benefits for which they are eligible. In 2011, about four in ten working households eligible for SNAP did not participate. Furthermore, the limited data available showed that families’ joint participation in Medicaid, SNAP and child care was very low compared to participation in any single program (less than 10 percent in some cases). (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Hahn, Heather; Isaacs, Julia; Wagner, Jennifer; Forster, Hilary
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2016

    This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS) describes the Work Support Strategies (WSS) initiative and reviews outcomes and implementation experiences from the multistate evaluation. WSS is designed to streamline the delivery of work supports to eligible families.

    This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS) describes the Work Support Strategies (WSS) initiative and reviews outcomes and implementation experiences from the multistate evaluation. WSS is designed to streamline the delivery of work supports to eligible families.

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