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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Roman, Caterina G.; Link, Nathan W.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2017

    Recently released prisoners in the United States are increasingly facing the burden of financial debt associated with correctional supervision, yet little research has pursued how-theoretically or empirically-the burden of debt might affect life after prison. To address this gap, we employ life course and strain perspectives and path analysis to examine the impact of child support debt on employment and recidivism, using longitudinal data from an evaluation of a prisoner reentry program known as the Serious and Violent Offender Reentry Initiative. Results indicate that having more debt has no effect on recidivism; however, more debt was significantly associated with a decrease in later legitimate employment. Implications for community reintegration and justice processing are discussed within the framework of past and emerging work on legal financial obligations, employment, and desistance from crime after prison. (Author abstract)

    Recently released prisoners in the United States are increasingly facing the burden of financial debt associated with correctional supervision, yet little research has pursued how-theoretically or empirically-the burden of debt might affect life after prison. To address this gap, we employ life course and strain perspectives and path analysis to examine the impact of child support debt on employment and recidivism, using longitudinal data from an evaluation of a prisoner reentry program known as the Serious and Violent Offender Reentry Initiative. Results indicate that having more debt has no effect on recidivism; however, more debt was significantly associated with a decrease in later legitimate employment. Implications for community reintegration and justice processing are discussed within the framework of past and emerging work on legal financial obligations, employment, and desistance from crime after prison. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Zief, Susan; Schulte, Theresa
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This brief highlights the implementation infrastructure of Personal Responsibility Education Program evidence-based teen pregnancy prevention programs in California, Maine, Pennsylvania, South Carolina. (Author abstract)

    This brief highlights the implementation infrastructure of Personal Responsibility Education Program evidence-based teen pregnancy prevention programs in California, Maine, Pennsylvania, South Carolina. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: James, Cemerè
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    Receipt of public work supports, such as nutrition assistance under the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), health insurance under Medicaid, and child care subsidies, can make a critical difference for low-income workers, stabilizing their employment and allowing them to meet their families’ basic needs. They also improve children’s long-term health and educational outcomes. Unfortunately, many families do not get the full package of work support benefits for which they are eligible. In 2011, about four in ten working households eligible for SNAP did not participate. Furthermore, the limited data available showed that families’ joint participation in Medicaid, SNAP and child care was very low compared to participation in any single program (less than 10 percent in some cases). (Author abstract)

    Receipt of public work supports, such as nutrition assistance under the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), health insurance under Medicaid, and child care subsidies, can make a critical difference for low-income workers, stabilizing their employment and allowing them to meet their families’ basic needs. They also improve children’s long-term health and educational outcomes. Unfortunately, many families do not get the full package of work support benefits for which they are eligible. In 2011, about four in ten working households eligible for SNAP did not participate. Furthermore, the limited data available showed that families’ joint participation in Medicaid, SNAP and child care was very low compared to participation in any single program (less than 10 percent in some cases). (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Lòpez-De Fede, Ana; Stewart, John E.; Hardin, James W.; Mayfield-Smith, Kathy
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2016

    Background: Measures of small-area deprivation may be valuable in geographically targeting limited resources to prevent, diagnose, and effectively manage chronic conditions in vulnerable populations. We developed a census-based small-area socioeconomic deprivation index specifically to predict chronic disease burden among publically insured Medicaid recipients in South Carolina, a relatively poor state in the southern United States. We compared the predictive ability of the new index with that of four other small-area deprivation indicators.

    Methods: To derive the ZIP Code Tabulation Area-Level Palmetto Small-Area Deprivation Index (Palmetto SADI), we evaluated ten census variables across five socioeconomic deprivation domains, identifying the combination of census indicators most highly correlated with a set of five chronic disease conditions among South Carolina Medicaid enrollees. In separate validation studies, we used both logistic and spatial regression methods to assess the ability of Palmetto SADI to predict chronic disease burden among state Medicaid recipients...

    Background: Measures of small-area deprivation may be valuable in geographically targeting limited resources to prevent, diagnose, and effectively manage chronic conditions in vulnerable populations. We developed a census-based small-area socioeconomic deprivation index specifically to predict chronic disease burden among publically insured Medicaid recipients in South Carolina, a relatively poor state in the southern United States. We compared the predictive ability of the new index with that of four other small-area deprivation indicators.

    Methods: To derive the ZIP Code Tabulation Area-Level Palmetto Small-Area Deprivation Index (Palmetto SADI), we evaluated ten census variables across five socioeconomic deprivation domains, identifying the combination of census indicators most highly correlated with a set of five chronic disease conditions among South Carolina Medicaid enrollees. In separate validation studies, we used both logistic and spatial regression methods to assess the ability of Palmetto SADI to predict chronic disease burden among state Medicaid recipients relative to four alternative small-area socioeconomic deprivation measures: the Townsend index of material deprivation; a single-variable poverty indicator; and two small-area designations of health care resource deprivation, Primary Care Health Professional Shortage Area and Medically Underserved Area/Medically Underserved Population.

    Results: Palmetto SADI was the best predictor of chronic disease burden (presence of at least one condition and presence of two or more conditions) among state Medicaid recipients compared to all alternative deprivation measures tested.

    Conclusions: A low-cost, regionally optimized socioeconomic deprivation index, Palmetto SADI can be used to identify areas in South Carolina at high risk for chronic disease burden among Medicaid recipients and other low-income Medicaid-eligible populations for targeted prevention, screening, diagnosis, disease self-management, and care coordination activities. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Hahn, Heather; Isaacs, Julia; Wagner, Jennifer; Forster, Hilary
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2016

    This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS) describes the Work Support Strategies (WSS) initiative and reviews outcomes and implementation experiences from the multistate evaluation. WSS is designed to streamline the delivery of work supports to eligible families.

    This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS) describes the Work Support Strategies (WSS) initiative and reviews outcomes and implementation experiences from the multistate evaluation. WSS is designed to streamline the delivery of work supports to eligible families.

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