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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Fein, David; Hamadyk, Jill
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    This report assesses the implementation and early impacts of Year Up, a national sectoral training program for young adults aged 18-24. Year Up aims to help low-income, low-skilled adults access and complete training leading to employment in high-demand, well-paying occupations. It is among nine programs Abt Associates is evaluating in Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE)—a study sponsored by the Administration for Children and Families. Operated by an organization of the same name, Year Up provides young adults with six months of full-time training in the IT and financial service sectors followed by six-month internships at major firms. The full-time program provides extensive supports—including weekly stipends—and puts a heavy emphasis on the development of professional and technical skills. Using a rigorous research design, the study found that young adults with access to Year Up had higher average quarterly earnings in the sixth and seventh quarters after random assignment—the confirmatory outcome selected to gauge Year Up’s overall success for this report....

    This report assesses the implementation and early impacts of Year Up, a national sectoral training program for young adults aged 18-24. Year Up aims to help low-income, low-skilled adults access and complete training leading to employment in high-demand, well-paying occupations. It is among nine programs Abt Associates is evaluating in Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE)—a study sponsored by the Administration for Children and Families. Operated by an organization of the same name, Year Up provides young adults with six months of full-time training in the IT and financial service sectors followed by six-month internships at major firms. The full-time program provides extensive supports—including weekly stipends—and puts a heavy emphasis on the development of professional and technical skills. Using a rigorous research design, the study found that young adults with access to Year Up had higher average quarterly earnings in the sixth and seventh quarters after random assignment—the confirmatory outcome selected to gauge Year Up’s overall success for this report. Compared to control group members who were not able to access the program, treatment group members also were more likely to report that their classes used active learning methods, taught life skills, and were relevant to their lives and careers. Persisting over a three-year follow-up period, Year Up’s earnings impacts are the largest reported to date for workforce programs tested using a random assignment design. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Buitrago, Katie
    Reference Type: Report, Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2017

    Permanent supportive housing providers interested in diversifying their funding sources may want to consider Medicaid as a way of supporting its services. The complexity involved with administering Medicaid can be a barrier for many PSH providers, however. In response to this issue, Heartland Alliance Health's (previously known as Heartland Health Outreach) Health Neighborhood Demonstration Project is implementing innovative ways to help permanent supportive housing providers benefit from Medicaid funding and improve health outcomes for HAH participants without having to take on the burdens of becoming Medicaid billers. The brief outlines the Health Neighborhood model and implementation, lessons learned, and key considerations for other organizations considering similar partnerships. (Author description)

    Permanent supportive housing providers interested in diversifying their funding sources may want to consider Medicaid as a way of supporting its services. The complexity involved with administering Medicaid can be a barrier for many PSH providers, however. In response to this issue, Heartland Alliance Health's (previously known as Heartland Health Outreach) Health Neighborhood Demonstration Project is implementing innovative ways to help permanent supportive housing providers benefit from Medicaid funding and improve health outcomes for HAH participants without having to take on the burdens of becoming Medicaid billers. The brief outlines the Health Neighborhood model and implementation, lessons learned, and key considerations for other organizations considering similar partnerships. (Author description)

  • Individual Author: Gillespie, Sarah; Popkin, Susan
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    This brief describes the opportunities to use housing as a platform for resident services, the challenges to coordinating services effectively in public and assisted housing, and the strategies and recommendations to ensure that service coordination is evidence based. It primarily highlights insights from the Urban Institute’s Housing Opportunity and Service’s Together (HOST) demonstration established in 2010 to test a whole-family, wraparound model for addressing intergenerational poverty and disadvantage in public and subsidized housing. Adapting lessons from HOST for current service coordination models, even in an environment of scarce resources, creates opportunities for new partners, strategies, and flexibilities. (author abstract)

    This brief describes the opportunities to use housing as a platform for resident services, the challenges to coordinating services effectively in public and assisted housing, and the strategies and recommendations to ensure that service coordination is evidence based. It primarily highlights insights from the Urban Institute’s Housing Opportunity and Service’s Together (HOST) demonstration established in 2010 to test a whole-family, wraparound model for addressing intergenerational poverty and disadvantage in public and subsidized housing. Adapting lessons from HOST for current service coordination models, even in an environment of scarce resources, creates opportunities for new partners, strategies, and flexibilities. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Wilkins, Carol; Burt, Martha
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    In October 2010, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE), contracted with Abt Associates Inc. for a study to explore the roles that Medicaid, Community Health Centers, and other HHS programs might play in providing services linked to housing for people who experience chronic homelessness through Permanent Supportive Housing (PSH). PSH provides a permanent home for formerly homeless people with disabilities, along with the health care and other supportive services needed to help tenants adjust to living in housing and make the changes in their lives that will help them keep their housing. It differs from group homes, board and care facilities, and other treatment programs in that most tenants hold their own leases, and keeping their housing is usually not contingent on their participating in services or remaining at a certain level of illness. The research team produced four issue papers on promising practices linking health, mental health, and substance abuse services to housing assistance for the target population...

    In October 2010, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE), contracted with Abt Associates Inc. for a study to explore the roles that Medicaid, Community Health Centers, and other HHS programs might play in providing services linked to housing for people who experience chronic homelessness through Permanent Supportive Housing (PSH). PSH provides a permanent home for formerly homeless people with disabilities, along with the health care and other supportive services needed to help tenants adjust to living in housing and make the changes in their lives that will help them keep their housing. It differs from group homes, board and care facilities, and other treatment programs in that most tenants hold their own leases, and keeping their housing is usually not contingent on their participating in services or remaining at a certain level of illness. The research team produced four issue papers on promising practices linking health, mental health, and substance abuse services to housing assistance for the target population of chronically homeless people. This issue paper focuses on the roles that public housing agencies (PHAs) can play in expanding opportunities for chronically homeless people to move into housing, including the participation of PHAs in expanding the supply of PSH. (author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Cortes, Alvaro; Dunton, Lauren; Henry, Meghan; Rolston, Howard; Khadduri, Jill; Albanese, Tom; Dahlem, Katherine; Holt, Emily; Jennings, Ruby; Spangler, Jill; White, Matt; Wilson, Erin
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    This final report presents findings from the Linking Human Services and Housing Supports to Address Family Homelessness project. Through in-depth, on-site case studies, this study observed 14 communities that coordinate federally funded housing supports and comprehensive services to more effectively serve homeless families and families at risk of becoming homeless. Seven of the models include participation from local public housing agencies (PHAs). The report includes information about the structure of the programs examined, common promising practices identified across the models, and detailed case studies of the 14 models. (Author abstract)

    This final report presents findings from the Linking Human Services and Housing Supports to Address Family Homelessness project. Through in-depth, on-site case studies, this study observed 14 communities that coordinate federally funded housing supports and comprehensive services to more effectively serve homeless families and families at risk of becoming homeless. Seven of the models include participation from local public housing agencies (PHAs). The report includes information about the structure of the programs examined, common promising practices identified across the models, and detailed case studies of the 14 models. (Author abstract)

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