Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Rynell, Amy; Tuttle, Samantha; Buitrago, Katie
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Chicago is currently facing a devastating surge in lethal violence in addition to staggering rates of poverty across Illinois. Policymakers and community leaders are struggling with finding short- and long-term solutions to stem the violence and allow neighborhoods to heal. In the meantime, communities are fearing for their own safety and grieving over lost parents, children, friends, and leaders every day. The stakes forgetting the solutions right could not be higher. Poverty and violence often intersect, feed one another, and share root causes. Neighborhoods with high levels of violence are also characterized by high levels of poverty, lack of adequate public services and educational opportunity, poorer health outcomes, asset and income inequality, and more. The underlying socioeconomic conditions in these neighborhoods perpetuate both violence and poverty. Furthermore, trauma can result from both violence and poverty. Unaddressed trauma worsens quality of life, makes it hard to rise out of poverty by posing barriers to success at school and work, and raises the likelihood of...

    Chicago is currently facing a devastating surge in lethal violence in addition to staggering rates of poverty across Illinois. Policymakers and community leaders are struggling with finding short- and long-term solutions to stem the violence and allow neighborhoods to heal. In the meantime, communities are fearing for their own safety and grieving over lost parents, children, friends, and leaders every day. The stakes forgetting the solutions right could not be higher. Poverty and violence often intersect, feed one another, and share root causes. Neighborhoods with high levels of violence are also characterized by high levels of poverty, lack of adequate public services and educational opportunity, poorer health outcomes, asset and income inequality, and more. The underlying socioeconomic conditions in these neighborhoods perpetuate both violence and poverty. Furthermore, trauma can result from both violence and poverty. Unaddressed trauma worsens quality of life, makes it hard to rise out of poverty by posing barriers to success at school and work, and raises the likelihood of aggressive behavior. In this way, untreated trauma—coupled with easy gun availability and other factors—feeds the cycle of poverty and violence. (Author desription)

  • Individual Author: Chernega, Jennifer; George, Christine C.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2014

    Our interest in editing this special issue stemmed from our experiences researching homelessness alleviation projects in Chicago including the Chicago Housing for Health Partnership (CHHP) and Chicago’s city-wide Plan to End Homelessness. CHHP provided homeless individuals with a quick path to permanent, supportive housing upon release from a hospital for chronic physical illness. With an experimental design, it followed those provided with the housing and compared their outcomes to those provided with “usual care”—a referral to a shelter. The Chicago Plan to End Homelessness implemented a Housing-First strategy, creating new programs to move people who were homeless quickly into permanent housing. It also increased allocations of funding for supportive housing. (author abstract)

    Our interest in editing this special issue stemmed from our experiences researching homelessness alleviation projects in Chicago including the Chicago Housing for Health Partnership (CHHP) and Chicago’s city-wide Plan to End Homelessness. CHHP provided homeless individuals with a quick path to permanent, supportive housing upon release from a hospital for chronic physical illness. With an experimental design, it followed those provided with the housing and compared their outcomes to those provided with “usual care”—a referral to a shelter. The Chicago Plan to End Homelessness implemented a Housing-First strategy, creating new programs to move people who were homeless quickly into permanent housing. It also increased allocations of funding for supportive housing. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Young P. Hong, Phillip ; Choi, Sangmi; Lewis, Dara
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2014

    The purpose of this research is to examine the process of psychological empowerment as it impacts exoffenders’ self-sufficiency. This transformational process of social inclusion involves developing employment hope as one strives for economic success. Using a sample of 154 exoffenders receiving services from a community-based social service organization in Chicago, this study investigated how self-esteem, self-efficacy, and employment hope affect self-sufficiency. Based on structural equation model analyses, employment hope significantly mediated the path from self-esteem to self-sufficiency. This study confirms previous studies that suggest a renewed focus on employment hope for comprehensively supporting exoffenders’ successful transition to self-sufficiency. (Author abstract) 

    The purpose of this research is to examine the process of psychological empowerment as it impacts exoffenders’ self-sufficiency. This transformational process of social inclusion involves developing employment hope as one strives for economic success. Using a sample of 154 exoffenders receiving services from a community-based social service organization in Chicago, this study investigated how self-esteem, self-efficacy, and employment hope affect self-sufficiency. Based on structural equation model analyses, employment hope significantly mediated the path from self-esteem to self-sufficiency. This study confirms previous studies that suggest a renewed focus on employment hope for comprehensively supporting exoffenders’ successful transition to self-sufficiency. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Golden, Olivia; Loprest, Pamela; Mills, Gregory
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    This report explores workforce and asset development strategies for improving the economic security of extremely vulnerable families, those facing major challenges beyond poverty. Evidence drawn from the authors' own research, their review of relevant literature, and learning sessions conducted by the Annie E. Casey Foundation's Center for Community and Economic Opportunity in Washington, DC, Chicago, and Portland, Maine, suggests that programs can succeed at improving the skills and employability of extremely vulnerable parents and increasing their savings to help tide them through emergencies. The paper also highlights opportunities to inform policy and support targeted research to advance this agenda. (author abstract)

    This report explores workforce and asset development strategies for improving the economic security of extremely vulnerable families, those facing major challenges beyond poverty. Evidence drawn from the authors' own research, their review of relevant literature, and learning sessions conducted by the Annie E. Casey Foundation's Center for Community and Economic Opportunity in Washington, DC, Chicago, and Portland, Maine, suggests that programs can succeed at improving the skills and employability of extremely vulnerable parents and increasing their savings to help tide them through emergencies. The paper also highlights opportunities to inform policy and support targeted research to advance this agenda. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2012

    Chicago, like most of the nation, is facing a high rate of unemployment, even while many businesses report a shortage of skilled labor. At the same time, many working residents in low-skilled jobs struggle to make ends meet, but lack the skills necessary to move into higher paying jobs. Although the area is home to numerous workforce development programs, little is known about what makes a program successful and about how these programs might help to improve employment for participants.

    Chapin Hall is engaged in a number of projects that explore issues around workforce development programs with a particular focus on the Chicago area. (author abstract)

    Chicago, like most of the nation, is facing a high rate of unemployment, even while many businesses report a shortage of skilled labor. At the same time, many working residents in low-skilled jobs struggle to make ends meet, but lack the skills necessary to move into higher paying jobs. Although the area is home to numerous workforce development programs, little is known about what makes a program successful and about how these programs might help to improve employment for participants.

    Chapin Hall is engaged in a number of projects that explore issues around workforce development programs with a particular focus on the Chicago area. (author abstract)

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 1997 to 2017

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations