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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Wood, Robert G.; Kisker, Ellen
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    This brief summarizes key findings from a study of the implementation of the Steps to Success program, a home visiting program for adolescent mothers that offers counseling on contraception, adequate birth spacing, parenting, and child development. Healthy Families San Angelo (HFSA)—an experienced, community-based organization in San Angelo, Texas—implemented the program with funding from a Personal Responsibility Education Program (PREP) grant. The implementation study was conducted in conjunction with a rigorous impact study in which adolescent mothers who agreed to take part in the study were randomly assigned to Steps to Success or to a control group that received a more traditional home visiting program that focused only on parenting and child development. (Author abstract) 

    This brief summarizes key findings from a study of the implementation of the Steps to Success program, a home visiting program for adolescent mothers that offers counseling on contraception, adequate birth spacing, parenting, and child development. Healthy Families San Angelo (HFSA)—an experienced, community-based organization in San Angelo, Texas—implemented the program with funding from a Personal Responsibility Education Program (PREP) grant. The implementation study was conducted in conjunction with a rigorous impact study in which adolescent mothers who agreed to take part in the study were randomly assigned to Steps to Success or to a control group that received a more traditional home visiting program that focused only on parenting and child development. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Wood, Robert G.; Goesling, Brian; Paulsell, Diane
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    The federal government has had a long-standing commitment to supporting healthy relationships and stable families. In the mid-1990s, Congress created the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) block grant, which had the formation and maintenance of two-parent families as one of its core purposes. TANF provided states with the funding and flexibility to support activities to promote healthy marriage. Beginning in the mid-2000s, the federal government began providing additional funding specifically to support healthy marriage and relationship education (HMRE) services. The Office of Family Assistance (OFA) in the Administration for Children & Families (ACF), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services oversees these funds and distributes them through a set of competitive multi-year grants to organizations nationwide. OFA made the most recent round of HMRE grant awards in September 2015. These grants support HMRE services for a mix of populations, including youth in high school, individual adults, and adult couples. (Author abstract) 

    The federal government has had a long-standing commitment to supporting healthy relationships and stable families. In the mid-1990s, Congress created the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) block grant, which had the formation and maintenance of two-parent families as one of its core purposes. TANF provided states with the funding and flexibility to support activities to promote healthy marriage. Beginning in the mid-2000s, the federal government began providing additional funding specifically to support healthy marriage and relationship education (HMRE) services. The Office of Family Assistance (OFA) in the Administration for Children & Families (ACF), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services oversees these funds and distributes them through a set of competitive multi-year grants to organizations nationwide. OFA made the most recent round of HMRE grant awards in September 2015. These grants support HMRE services for a mix of populations, including youth in high school, individual adults, and adult couples. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Richburg-Hayes, Lashawn; Anzelone, Caitlin; Dechausay, Nadine; Landers, Patrick
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This report represents the final synthesis of the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency project. Overall, the project’s findings demonstrated that applying behavioral insights to challenges facing human services programs can improve program efficiency, operations, and outcomes at a relatively low cost.

    The report discusses in detail:

    •overall findings from the project;

    •lessons learned during the knowledge development period as well as across the project’s sites;

    •the broader context in which the findings are situated, with respect to both applied behavioral insights and human services; and

    •implications for future research and practice.

    Each chapter is accompanied by at least one independent commentary by an expert in the field. (Author abstract)

    This report represents the final synthesis of the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency project. Overall, the project’s findings demonstrated that applying behavioral insights to challenges facing human services programs can improve program efficiency, operations, and outcomes at a relatively low cost.

    The report discusses in detail:

    •overall findings from the project;

    •lessons learned during the knowledge development period as well as across the project’s sites;

    •the broader context in which the findings are situated, with respect to both applied behavioral insights and human services; and

    •implications for future research and practice.

    Each chapter is accompanied by at least one independent commentary by an expert in the field. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Ferguson, Daniel
    Reference Type: White Papers
    Year: 2017

    This Research-to-Policy Resource List provides a comprehensive list of city universal preschool initiative evaluations and research in the Research Connections collection. To count as universal, a city's program must aim to eventually provide universal access to publicly-funded preschool for all four-year-olds using at least some city funds, even if it does not currently achieve universal access. Some well-known programs do not meet these criteria, either because they are the city-based implementation of a state universal preschool program (Tulsa, Oklahoma) or because they do not aim for universal access (Chicago's Child-Parent Centers; Salt Lake City, Utah). Cities with universal preschool programs were identified in recent reviews by the American Institutes for Research and the Rand Corporation, as well as in news reports. A number of city programs have not produced evaluations or research publications or are still in the planning or early implementation stages, including Cincinnati, Ohio; Cleveland, Ohio; Dayton, Ohio; Santa Fe, New Mexico; Seattle, Washington; and West...

    This Research-to-Policy Resource List provides a comprehensive list of city universal preschool initiative evaluations and research in the Research Connections collection. To count as universal, a city's program must aim to eventually provide universal access to publicly-funded preschool for all four-year-olds using at least some city funds, even if it does not currently achieve universal access. Some well-known programs do not meet these criteria, either because they are the city-based implementation of a state universal preschool program (Tulsa, Oklahoma) or because they do not aim for universal access (Chicago's Child-Parent Centers; Salt Lake City, Utah). Cities with universal preschool programs were identified in recent reviews by the American Institutes for Research and the Rand Corporation, as well as in news reports. A number of city programs have not produced evaluations or research publications or are still in the planning or early implementation stages, including Cincinnati, Ohio; Cleveland, Ohio; Dayton, Ohio; Santa Fe, New Mexico; Seattle, Washington; and West Sacramento, California. The city universal preschool initiatives that have produced research or evaluation publications and are included here are: Boston, Massachusetts; Denver, Colorado; Los Angeles, California; New York, New York; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; San Antonio, Texas; San Francisco, California; and Washington, District of Columbia. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Cozzolino, Elizabeth; Williams, Christine L.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2017

    Despite increased spending on child support enforcement in the United States over the past 30 years, child support collections remain around 40 percent. Child support is a gendered phenomenon, typically involving a transfer of funds from noncustodial fathers to custodial mothers in most cases. We argue that new norms of separated fatherhood and motherhood may contribute to low rates of child support compliance. An analysis of 21 in-depth interviews with members of separated families about the meaning of child support payments reveals two controlling images of gendered parenting—the child support queen and the disappointing dad—that hold single mothers responsible for children’s economic as well as emotional well-being and evaluate separated fathers mostly on their emotional involvement with children. Because these gendered expectations downplay the importance of noncustodial fathers’ financial contributions and question custodial mothers’ entitlement to receive child support, they reinforce gender inequality in separated families and may contribute to low rates of child support...

    Despite increased spending on child support enforcement in the United States over the past 30 years, child support collections remain around 40 percent. Child support is a gendered phenomenon, typically involving a transfer of funds from noncustodial fathers to custodial mothers in most cases. We argue that new norms of separated fatherhood and motherhood may contribute to low rates of child support compliance. An analysis of 21 in-depth interviews with members of separated families about the meaning of child support payments reveals two controlling images of gendered parenting—the child support queen and the disappointing dad—that hold single mothers responsible for children’s economic as well as emotional well-being and evaluate separated fathers mostly on their emotional involvement with children. Because these gendered expectations downplay the importance of noncustodial fathers’ financial contributions and question custodial mothers’ entitlement to receive child support, they reinforce gender inequality in separated families and may contribute to low rates of child support collection. (Author abstract)

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