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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
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  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: James, Cemerè
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    Receipt of public work supports, such as nutrition assistance under the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), health insurance under Medicaid, and child care subsidies, can make a critical difference for low-income workers, stabilizing their employment and allowing them to meet their families’ basic needs. They also improve children’s long-term health and educational outcomes. Unfortunately, many families do not get the full package of work support benefits for which they are eligible. In 2011, about four in ten working households eligible for SNAP did not participate. Furthermore, the limited data available showed that families’ joint participation in Medicaid, SNAP and child care was very low compared to participation in any single program (less than 10 percent in some cases). (Author abstract)

    Receipt of public work supports, such as nutrition assistance under the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), health insurance under Medicaid, and child care subsidies, can make a critical difference for low-income workers, stabilizing their employment and allowing them to meet their families’ basic needs. They also improve children’s long-term health and educational outcomes. Unfortunately, many families do not get the full package of work support benefits for which they are eligible. In 2011, about four in ten working households eligible for SNAP did not participate. Furthermore, the limited data available showed that families’ joint participation in Medicaid, SNAP and child care was very low compared to participation in any single program (less than 10 percent in some cases). (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Hahn, Heather; Isaacs, Julia; Wagner, Jennifer; Forster, Hilary
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2016

    This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS) describes the Work Support Strategies (WSS) initiative and reviews outcomes and implementation experiences from the multistate evaluation. WSS is designed to streamline the delivery of work supports to eligible families.

    This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS) describes the Work Support Strategies (WSS) initiative and reviews outcomes and implementation experiences from the multistate evaluation. WSS is designed to streamline the delivery of work supports to eligible families.

  • Individual Author: Showalter, Thomas; Spiker, Katie
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    A new paper by National Skills Coalition and National Youth Employment Coalition finds that well-designed work-based learning opportunities can provide youth with occupational and work readiness training while providing income support for disconnected and at-risk youth. The paper examines four different work-based learning strategies, illustrates key elements of success, identifies challenges, and makes policy recommendations to address those challenges. (Author abstract)

    A new paper by National Skills Coalition and National Youth Employment Coalition finds that well-designed work-based learning opportunities can provide youth with occupational and work readiness training while providing income support for disconnected and at-risk youth. The paper examines four different work-based learning strategies, illustrates key elements of success, identifies challenges, and makes policy recommendations to address those challenges. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Ma, Connie
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    How should the North Carolina Community College System (NCCCS) support community colleges and counties in joining the Federal SNAP Employment & Training (SNAP E&T) program’s third-party match model to leverage the 50/50 funding stream? This report contains recommended strategies for how the NCCCS should participate in the third-party match model of SNAP E&T 50/50 funding. (Author abstract)

    How should the North Carolina Community College System (NCCCS) support community colleges and counties in joining the Federal SNAP Employment & Training (SNAP E&T) program’s third-party match model to leverage the 50/50 funding stream? This report contains recommended strategies for how the NCCCS should participate in the third-party match model of SNAP E&T 50/50 funding. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Gustafsson, Hanna C.; Cox, Martha J.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2016

    Despite evidence that individuals living in low-income and rural communities may be at heightened risk for intimate partner violence (IPV), little is known about the prevalence and nature of IPV occurring in these communities. The goal of the current study, therefore, was to characterize IPV occurring in a population-based sample of families living in communities characterized by rural poverty. Specifically, we examined the prevalence, severity, and chronicity of IPV occurring in this high-risk sample, as well as the demographic correlates thereof. Using data from multiple assessments across the first 5 years of their child’s life, we also examined changes in the prevalence of IPV across this time. Results indicate that IPV was most prevalent around the birth of the target child and that the population-level prevalence of IPV decreased significantly over the subsequent 5 years. Although previous research suggests that children under the age of five are at heightened risk for IPV relative to older children, this is the first study to our knowledge to demonstrate that there are...

    Despite evidence that individuals living in low-income and rural communities may be at heightened risk for intimate partner violence (IPV), little is known about the prevalence and nature of IPV occurring in these communities. The goal of the current study, therefore, was to characterize IPV occurring in a population-based sample of families living in communities characterized by rural poverty. Specifically, we examined the prevalence, severity, and chronicity of IPV occurring in this high-risk sample, as well as the demographic correlates thereof. Using data from multiple assessments across the first 5 years of their child’s life, we also examined changes in the prevalence of IPV across this time. Results indicate that IPV was most prevalent around the birth of the target child and that the population-level prevalence of IPV decreased significantly over the subsequent 5 years. Although previous research suggests that children under the age of five are at heightened risk for IPV relative to older children, this is the first study to our knowledge to demonstrate that there are changes in the prevalence of IPV within this high-risk age period. (author abstract)

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