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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Farmers Market Coalition
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    With funding from the USDA Food and Nutrition Service’s Farmers Market SNAP Support Grants (FMSSG), five market organizations employed focus groups in 2016 to refine their SNAP marketing strategy and uncover any remaining barriers for SNAP shoppers at farmers markets. This case study profiles those efforts and includes links to available resources and contact information. (Author abstract)

    With funding from the USDA Food and Nutrition Service’s Farmers Market SNAP Support Grants (FMSSG), five market organizations employed focus groups in 2016 to refine their SNAP marketing strategy and uncover any remaining barriers for SNAP shoppers at farmers markets. This case study profiles those efforts and includes links to available resources and contact information. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Roman, Caterina G.; Link, Nathan W.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2017

    Recently released prisoners in the United States are increasingly facing the burden of financial debt associated with correctional supervision, yet little research has pursued how-theoretically or empirically-the burden of debt might affect life after prison. To address this gap, we employ life course and strain perspectives and path analysis to examine the impact of child support debt on employment and recidivism, using longitudinal data from an evaluation of a prisoner reentry program known as the Serious and Violent Offender Reentry Initiative. Results indicate that having more debt has no effect on recidivism; however, more debt was significantly associated with a decrease in later legitimate employment. Implications for community reintegration and justice processing are discussed within the framework of past and emerging work on legal financial obligations, employment, and desistance from crime after prison. (Author abstract)

    Recently released prisoners in the United States are increasingly facing the burden of financial debt associated with correctional supervision, yet little research has pursued how-theoretically or empirically-the burden of debt might affect life after prison. To address this gap, we employ life course and strain perspectives and path analysis to examine the impact of child support debt on employment and recidivism, using longitudinal data from an evaluation of a prisoner reentry program known as the Serious and Violent Offender Reentry Initiative. Results indicate that having more debt has no effect on recidivism; however, more debt was significantly associated with a decrease in later legitimate employment. Implications for community reintegration and justice processing are discussed within the framework of past and emerging work on legal financial obligations, employment, and desistance from crime after prison. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Khadduri, Jill; Burt, Martha R.; Walton, Douglas
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    What are the patterns of benefit receipt among families who experience homelessness? This brief uses data collected for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Family Options Study to analyze patterns of receipt of TANF cash assistance, SNAP food assistance, and publicly funded health insurance benefits among these families, with a focus on the characteristics of those receiving and not receiving benefits. The brief:

    • Examines whether family characteristics, including age, marital status, and demographic characteristics relate to benefit receipt
    • Explores the relationship between benefit receipt and housing instability following an initial shelter stay
    • Examines whether help accessing benefits is related to families’ TANF receipt. (Author abstract) 

    What are the patterns of benefit receipt among families who experience homelessness? This brief uses data collected for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Family Options Study to analyze patterns of receipt of TANF cash assistance, SNAP food assistance, and publicly funded health insurance benefits among these families, with a focus on the characteristics of those receiving and not receiving benefits. The brief:

    • Examines whether family characteristics, including age, marital status, and demographic characteristics relate to benefit receipt
    • Explores the relationship between benefit receipt and housing instability following an initial shelter stay
    • Examines whether help accessing benefits is related to families’ TANF receipt. (Author abstract) 
  • Individual Author: D’Angelo, Angela V. ; Knas, Emily ; Holcomb, Pamela ; Edin, Kathryn
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    This brief explores fathers' social support networks to learn about the size and composition of their family and friendship ties, the types of support they get through these connections, and the types of organizations from which the fathers receive services.

    Findings indicate that fathers:

    • typically had small social networks, and some fathers had no supportive family or friends;
    • used their social networks for four main types of support: emotional, financial, in-kind, and housing; and
    • reported using supports from organizations such as religious organizations, community service agencies, and community based-organizations.

    The findings in the brief come from qualitative interviews with participants in four Responsible Fatherhood grantee programs:

    • The Center for Fathering at Urban Ventures (Minneapolis, Minnesota)
    • The Family Formation Program at Fathers' Support Center (St. Louis, Missouri)
    • Successful STEPS at Connections to Success (Kansas City, Kansas and Missouri)
    • The FATHER Project at...

    This brief explores fathers' social support networks to learn about the size and composition of their family and friendship ties, the types of support they get through these connections, and the types of organizations from which the fathers receive services.

    Findings indicate that fathers:

    • typically had small social networks, and some fathers had no supportive family or friends;
    • used their social networks for four main types of support: emotional, financial, in-kind, and housing; and
    • reported using supports from organizations such as religious organizations, community service agencies, and community based-organizations.

    The findings in the brief come from qualitative interviews with participants in four Responsible Fatherhood grantee programs:

    • The Center for Fathering at Urban Ventures (Minneapolis, Minnesota)
    • The Family Formation Program at Fathers' Support Center (St. Louis, Missouri)
    • Successful STEPS at Connections to Success (Kansas City, Kansas and Missouri)
    • The FATHER Project at Goodwill/Easter Seals of Minnesota (Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota). (author abstract)
  • Individual Author: Bratt, Rachel G.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    Despite the private for-profit sector's importance in affordable housing development, there has been relatively little research on the sector. This working paper explores one of the country's leading for-profit affordable housing developers, McCormack Baron Salazar (MBS) and provides some insights into their successful business model.

    The paper uses the "Quadruple Bottom Line," to both review the literature on for-profit affordable housing developers and to assess the operation of MBS. With a strong commitment to low-income housing and community revitalization, MBS focuses on converting large, deteriorated housing developments into new mixed-income communities.

    Also discussed are the "essential ingredients," that need to be in place for MBS to make a commitment to do a specific project. Nevertheless, even a project that incorporates all of these factors may still face significant challenges, largely due to external constraints and the complexity of developing and managing high quality affordable housing.

    The paper concludes with an overview of the components...

    Despite the private for-profit sector's importance in affordable housing development, there has been relatively little research on the sector. This working paper explores one of the country's leading for-profit affordable housing developers, McCormack Baron Salazar (MBS) and provides some insights into their successful business model.

    The paper uses the "Quadruple Bottom Line," to both review the literature on for-profit affordable housing developers and to assess the operation of MBS. With a strong commitment to low-income housing and community revitalization, MBS focuses on converting large, deteriorated housing developments into new mixed-income communities.

    Also discussed are the "essential ingredients," that need to be in place for MBS to make a commitment to do a specific project. Nevertheless, even a project that incorporates all of these factors may still face significant challenges, largely due to external constraints and the complexity of developing and managing high quality affordable housing.

    The paper concludes with an overview of the components of successful public-private affordable housing programs, regardless of whether the developer is a for-profit or a nonprofit. The recommendations also emphasize the importance of a strong and committed federal role in affordable housing development, including the need for deeper housing subsidies, with less reliance on multiple funders for putting together affordable housing development deals. Even a large, well-capitalized firm like MBS cannot develop affordable housing without additional significant public and private resources. (Author abstract)

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