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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Farrell, Mary; Smith, Jared; Reardon, Leigh; Obara, Emmi
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    This report presents findings from an intervention designed to increase the number of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families recipients who “reengaged” in Los Angeles County’s welfare-to-work program.

    Two behaviorally informed notices went out to different groups of participants:

    • A notice highlighting the losses they might face by not attending the reengagement appointment; and
    • A notice highlighting the benefits they might receive by attending.

    A third control group did not receive either behaviorally informed notice.

    Participants received the notice one week before their appointment. The test found that receiving a behaviorally informed notice increased the percentage of group members who engaged in the program within 30 days of their scheduled reengagement appointment, with the increase driven by the loss notice (author abstract).

    This report presents findings from an intervention designed to increase the number of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families recipients who “reengaged” in Los Angeles County’s welfare-to-work program.

    Two behaviorally informed notices went out to different groups of participants:

    • A notice highlighting the losses they might face by not attending the reengagement appointment; and
    • A notice highlighting the benefits they might receive by attending.

    A third control group did not receive either behaviorally informed notice.

    Participants received the notice one week before their appointment. The test found that receiving a behaviorally informed notice increased the percentage of group members who engaged in the program within 30 days of their scheduled reengagement appointment, with the increase driven by the loss notice (author abstract).

  • Individual Author: Glosser, Asaph; Barden, Bret; Williams, Sonya; Anderson, Chloe
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    This report presents implementation findings and early impact results -- one year -- from a random assignment evaluation of subsidized employment for TANF recipients in Los Angeles County. The study examines the impact of two distinct approaches to subsidized employment. This test is part of ACF’s Subsidized and Transitional Employment Demonstration.

    The first, Paid Work Experience, subsidizes the wages of individuals placed at nonprofit or public-sector employers. The second, On-the-Job Training, offers wage subsidies to private-sector employers who agree to place employees onto their payrolls after an initial two-month tryout period; if they do, the wage subsidies can continue for up to an additional four months.

    Findings examine placement rates, retention, additional welfare-to-work services received, employment, earnings, and other measures of well-being. (Author abstract)

    This report presents implementation findings and early impact results -- one year -- from a random assignment evaluation of subsidized employment for TANF recipients in Los Angeles County. The study examines the impact of two distinct approaches to subsidized employment. This test is part of ACF’s Subsidized and Transitional Employment Demonstration.

    The first, Paid Work Experience, subsidizes the wages of individuals placed at nonprofit or public-sector employers. The second, On-the-Job Training, offers wage subsidies to private-sector employers who agree to place employees onto their payrolls after an initial two-month tryout period; if they do, the wage subsidies can continue for up to an additional four months.

    Findings examine placement rates, retention, additional welfare-to-work services received, employment, earnings, and other measures of well-being. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Eisenman, David P.; Adams, Rachel M. ; Rivard, Helene
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2016

    Community resilience programs require metrics for evaluation but none exist for measuring outcomes at the household and neighborhood level. Objectives: We develop and describe a new index, the LACCDR index of community resilience, to examine how resilience varied across communities at baseline, prior to implementation of the Los Angeles County Community Disaster Resilience Project (LACCDR). Methods: We surveyed 4700 adult residents in the sixteen LACCDR communities in English, Spanish and Korean. Each of the survey domains were selected a priori as outcome indicators aligned to the theoretical levers of community resilience. Survey questions were drawn and adapted from published studies and national surveys. Results: Factor analysis demonstrated five separate factors composed from 18 items and explaining 46.7% of the variance. The factors were characterized as community engagement, emergency supplies, communication with neighbors, civic engagement, and collective efficacy. Baseline results for the 16 communities are provided. Conclusions: We conclude that the LACCDR community...

    Community resilience programs require metrics for evaluation but none exist for measuring outcomes at the household and neighborhood level. Objectives: We develop and describe a new index, the LACCDR index of community resilience, to examine how resilience varied across communities at baseline, prior to implementation of the Los Angeles County Community Disaster Resilience Project (LACCDR). Methods: We surveyed 4700 adult residents in the sixteen LACCDR communities in English, Spanish and Korean. Each of the survey domains were selected a priori as outcome indicators aligned to the theoretical levers of community resilience. Survey questions were drawn and adapted from published studies and national surveys. Results: Factor analysis demonstrated five separate factors composed from 18 items and explaining 46.7% of the variance. The factors were characterized as community engagement, emergency supplies, communication with neighbors, civic engagement, and collective efficacy. Baseline results for the 16 communities are provided. Conclusions: We conclude that the LACCDR community resilience index can be used to measure resilience program outcomes at the neighborhood and household levels. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Zogg, Jennifer ; Bono, Michael
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2015

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2015 NAWRS workshop summarizes the methodology and findings of a study of parents receiving aid from CalWORKs. The study examined service utilization patterns of several subgroups of CalWORKs adults using data matching of individual case records.

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2015 NAWRS workshop summarizes the methodology and findings of a study of parents receiving aid from CalWORKs. The study examined service utilization patterns of several subgroups of CalWORKs adults using data matching of individual case records.

  • Individual Author: Bono, Michael
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    This report is intended to provide guidance to Los Angeles County's Department of Public Social Services (DPSS) in its efforts to boost the effectiveness of the advocacy services provided to permanently disabled General Relief (GR) recipients seeking to gain approval for the Federal Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program. The results reported in what follows are based on a sample of 24J66 GR recipients who applied for SSI over a 51-month period spanning from January 2008 through March 2012. Rigorous statistical methods were applied to this population to identify the types of GR recipients most and least likely to gain approval for SSI. One of the most critical findings reported here is the decidedly inverse relationship between the duration of GR tenure and the probability of gaining approval for SSI. As all three measures of GR tenure increase - i.e. the number of months on GR, the number of GR spells, and the length of the longest GR spell -the odds of gaining approval for SSI decline. This suggests additional steps should be considered to ensure recipients with serious and...

    This report is intended to provide guidance to Los Angeles County's Department of Public Social Services (DPSS) in its efforts to boost the effectiveness of the advocacy services provided to permanently disabled General Relief (GR) recipients seeking to gain approval for the Federal Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program. The results reported in what follows are based on a sample of 24J66 GR recipients who applied for SSI over a 51-month period spanning from January 2008 through March 2012. Rigorous statistical methods were applied to this population to identify the types of GR recipients most and least likely to gain approval for SSI. One of the most critical findings reported here is the decidedly inverse relationship between the duration of GR tenure and the probability of gaining approval for SSI. As all three measures of GR tenure increase - i.e. the number of months on GR, the number of GR spells, and the length of the longest GR spell -the odds of gaining approval for SSI decline. This suggests additional steps should be considered to ensure recipients with serious and permanent disabilities are routed to SSI advocacy services at GR intake. Homelessness also poses a barrier to SSI approval, particularly long episodes of homelessness. At the same time, applicants who were continuously disabled for the entire time they were on GR had better chances of gaining approval for SSI by comparison with those with intermittent disabilities. Three years after submission of their SSI applications, 71% of the recipients who were disabled continuously during their time on GR gained approval for SSI, versus 44.2% of those whose disabilities were episodic. By extension, recipients with no history of employment during their GR tenures were much more likely to gain approval for SSI than those who had any history of employment at all. In more general terms, this report shows that the SSI application process, from submission to the final decision, appears to be protracted. The median duration of time for this process is approximately 2.5 years, which includes those who were not approved within the 51-month study period. Slightly fewer than ten percent of the observed applicants were approved for SSI one year after submission of their applications; 35.2% were approved after two years; and 63.6% were approved after three years. (Author Introduction)

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