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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Levy, Diane K. ; Edmonds, Leiha; Simington, Jasmine
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    This brief presents information on work requirement policies implemented by public housing agencies and estimates the percent of households affected by the requirements. Noting the lack of evidence on the outcomes and effects of work requirements on households’ employment and income and on the agencies’ implementation costs, it closes with questions to guide future research and policy considerations. (Author abstract) 

    This brief presents information on work requirement policies implemented by public housing agencies and estimates the percent of households affected by the requirements. Noting the lack of evidence on the outcomes and effects of work requirements on households’ employment and income and on the agencies’ implementation costs, it closes with questions to guide future research and policy considerations. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Prindle, John J.; Hammond, Ivy; Putnam-Hornstein, Emily
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2018

    Infants have the highest rates of maltreatment reporting and entries to foster care. Prenatal substance exposure is thought to contribute to early involvement with child protective services (CPS), yet there have been limited data with which to examine this relationship or variations by substance type. Using linked birth, hospital discharge, and CPS records from California, we estimated the population prevalence of medically diagnosed substance exposure and neonatal withdrawal disorders at birth. We then explored the corresponding rates of CPS involvement during the first year of life by substance type after adjusting for sociodemographic and health factors. Among 551,232 infants born alive in 2006, 1.45% (n = 7994) were diagnosed with prenatal substance exposure at birth; 61.2% of those diagnosed were reported to CPS before age 1 and nearly one third (29.9%) were placed in foster care. Medically diagnosed prenatal substance exposure was strongly associated with an infant’s likelihood of being reported to CPS, yet significant variation in the likelihood and level of CPS...

    Infants have the highest rates of maltreatment reporting and entries to foster care. Prenatal substance exposure is thought to contribute to early involvement with child protective services (CPS), yet there have been limited data with which to examine this relationship or variations by substance type. Using linked birth, hospital discharge, and CPS records from California, we estimated the population prevalence of medically diagnosed substance exposure and neonatal withdrawal disorders at birth. We then explored the corresponding rates of CPS involvement during the first year of life by substance type after adjusting for sociodemographic and health factors. Among 551,232 infants born alive in 2006, 1.45% (n = 7994) were diagnosed with prenatal substance exposure at birth; 61.2% of those diagnosed were reported to CPS before age 1 and nearly one third (29.9%) were placed in foster care. Medically diagnosed prenatal substance exposure was strongly associated with an infant’s likelihood of being reported to CPS, yet significant variation in the likelihood and level of CPS involvement was observed by substance type. Although these data undoubtedly understate the prevalence of prenatal illicit drug and alcohol use, this study provides a population-based characterization of a common pathway to CPS involvement during infancy. Future research is needed to explicate the longer-term trajectories of infants diagnosed with prenatal substance exposure, including the role of CPS. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Northrop, Rebecca; Jones, Christopher; Laluces, Dalton; Green, La Tonya; Crumel, Kenya; Vandawalker, Melissa; Henry, Meghan; Solari, Claudia D.; Locke, Gretchen; Khadduri, Jill
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    The Frank Melville Supportive Housing Investment Act of 2010 introduced significant reforms to the Section 811 supportive housing for non-elderly adults with disabilities, including the new Section 811 Project Rental Assistance (PRA) Program and a mandated evaluation of its implementation and effectiveness. The Phase I is an implementation evaluation focused on the initial 18 months (Jan 2015-June 2016) of program implementation by the first 12 grantees funded through the Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 grant competition. It provides an overall picture of how the demonstration was implemented in the initial states and analyzes differences in program design, target population, and housing and service strategies. The overarching research questions include an assessment of the following aspects of program implementation: partnerships between state housing and health and human services or Medicaid agencies; property and unit selection strategies; target population outreach and referral approaches; supportive services availability; and major challenges and successes. Grantees spent much of the...

    The Frank Melville Supportive Housing Investment Act of 2010 introduced significant reforms to the Section 811 supportive housing for non-elderly adults with disabilities, including the new Section 811 Project Rental Assistance (PRA) Program and a mandated evaluation of its implementation and effectiveness. The Phase I is an implementation evaluation focused on the initial 18 months (Jan 2015-June 2016) of program implementation by the first 12 grantees funded through the Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 grant competition. It provides an overall picture of how the demonstration was implemented in the initial states and analyzes differences in program design, target population, and housing and service strategies. The overarching research questions include an assessment of the following aspects of program implementation: partnerships between state housing and health and human services or Medicaid agencies; property and unit selection strategies; target population outreach and referral approaches; supportive services availability; and major challenges and successes. Grantees spent much of the period covered by Phase I of the evaluation solidifying partner roles and responsibilities and developing the systems and procedures needed to accommodate this new and complex approach to providing affordable housing for people with disabilities. The pace of attracting properties and units to the program and leasing units has been slower than HUD and grantees expected for a variety of reasons, such as tight housing market conditions (high-price and low-vacancy), difficulty aligning housing and services, program requirements, and location mismatch. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Hicks, Andrew L. ; Handcock, Mark S. ; Sastry, Narayan ; Pebley, Anne R.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2018

    Prior research has suggested that children living in a disadvantaged neighborhood have lower achievement test scores, but these studies typically have not estimated causal effects that account for neighborhood choice. Recent studies used propensity score methods to account for the endogeneity of neighborhood exposures, comparing disadvantaged and nondisadvantaged neighborhoods. We develop an alternative propensity function approach in which cumulative neighborhood effects are modeled as a continuous treatment variable. This approach offers several advantages. We use our approach to examine the cumulative effects of neighborhood disadvantage on reading and math test scores in Los Angeles. Our substantive results indicate that recency of exposure to disadvantaged neighborhoods may be more important than average exposure for children’s test scores. We conclude that studies of child development should consider both average cumulative neighborhood exposure and the timing of this exposure. (Author abstract)

     

    Prior research has suggested that children living in a disadvantaged neighborhood have lower achievement test scores, but these studies typically have not estimated causal effects that account for neighborhood choice. Recent studies used propensity score methods to account for the endogeneity of neighborhood exposures, comparing disadvantaged and nondisadvantaged neighborhoods. We develop an alternative propensity function approach in which cumulative neighborhood effects are modeled as a continuous treatment variable. This approach offers several advantages. We use our approach to examine the cumulative effects of neighborhood disadvantage on reading and math test scores in Los Angeles. Our substantive results indicate that recency of exposure to disadvantaged neighborhoods may be more important than average exposure for children’s test scores. We conclude that studies of child development should consider both average cumulative neighborhood exposure and the timing of this exposure. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Williams, Sonya; Hendra, Richard
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    Programs designed to help disadvantaged workers improve their labor-market prospects may have effects beyond improvements in employment rates and income. One possible supplementary effect is improvements in subjective well-being, or how participants feel about their current life situations. Subjective well-being is important because there are social costs related to lower levels of well-being, and because a person’s outlook has been demonstrated to have an effect on his or her future behavior. The Subsidized and Transitional Employment Demonstration (STED) is designed to investigate the effects of subsidized and transitional employment programs on both financial and nonfinancial well-being. The STED project is evaluating a total of eight subsidized employment programs in seven locations across the United States, all of which aim to improve participants’ long-term success in the labor market. The programs target groups considered “hard to employ” (recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families [TANF], people with criminal records, young people who are neither in school nor...

    Programs designed to help disadvantaged workers improve their labor-market prospects may have effects beyond improvements in employment rates and income. One possible supplementary effect is improvements in subjective well-being, or how participants feel about their current life situations. Subjective well-being is important because there are social costs related to lower levels of well-being, and because a person’s outlook has been demonstrated to have an effect on his or her future behavior. The Subsidized and Transitional Employment Demonstration (STED) is designed to investigate the effects of subsidized and transitional employment programs on both financial and nonfinancial well-being. The STED project is evaluating a total of eight subsidized employment programs in seven locations across the United States, all of which aim to improve participants’ long-term success in the labor market. The programs target groups considered “hard to employ” (recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families [TANF], people with criminal records, young people who are neither in school nor working, noncustodial parents, and others), and they use subsidies to give participants opportunities to learn employment skills while working in supportive settings, or to help them get a foot in the door with employers. Most of the programs also provide support services to help participants address personal barriers to steady work. (Author abstract) 

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