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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Carson, Jessica A.; Mattingly, Marybeth J.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    In this brief, we use interview and focus group data to describe some of the ways that restricted rural housing stock affects working families in two rural New England counties, and explore solutions proposed by rural residents and experts to make housing affordable (see Box 1 on page 2). Rural amenities and scenery make residence in certain New England regions desirable for second-home owners, vacationers, and retirees. However, the use of housing for these purposes, combined with efforts to conserve acreage and preserve scenery, serves to diminish the supply of housing, making it unaffordable for many low- and moderate-income residents. Moreover, the housing that is available varies in quality, and regional nonprofit and federal housing assistance programs lack the capacity to meet all residents' needs. (Author abstract)

    This report was also published as an Issue Brief at the Carsey Institute for Public Policy at the University of New Hampshire.

    In this brief, we use interview and focus group data to describe some of the ways that restricted rural housing stock affects working families in two rural New England counties, and explore solutions proposed by rural residents and experts to make housing affordable (see Box 1 on page 2). Rural amenities and scenery make residence in certain New England regions desirable for second-home owners, vacationers, and retirees. However, the use of housing for these purposes, combined with efforts to conserve acreage and preserve scenery, serves to diminish the supply of housing, making it unaffordable for many low- and moderate-income residents. Moreover, the housing that is available varies in quality, and regional nonprofit and federal housing assistance programs lack the capacity to meet all residents' needs. (Author abstract)

    This report was also published as an Issue Brief at the Carsey Institute for Public Policy at the University of New Hampshire.

  • Individual Author: Snell-Rood, Claire; Feltner, Frances; Schoenberg, Nancy
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2018

    The prevalence of depression among rural women is nearly twice the national average, yet limited mental health services and extensive social barriers restrict access to needed treatment. We conducted key informant interviews with community health workers (CHWs) and diverse health care professionals who provide care to Appalachian women with depression to better understand the potential roles that CHWs may play to improve women’s treatment engagement. In the gap created by service disparities and social barriers, CHWs can offer a substantial contribution through improving recognition of depression; deepening rural women’s engagement within existing services; and offering sustained, culturally appropriate support. (Author abstract)

    The prevalence of depression among rural women is nearly twice the national average, yet limited mental health services and extensive social barriers restrict access to needed treatment. We conducted key informant interviews with community health workers (CHWs) and diverse health care professionals who provide care to Appalachian women with depression to better understand the potential roles that CHWs may play to improve women’s treatment engagement. In the gap created by service disparities and social barriers, CHWs can offer a substantial contribution through improving recognition of depression; deepening rural women’s engagement within existing services; and offering sustained, culturally appropriate support. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Farmers Market Coalition
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    With funding from the USDA Food and Nutrition Service’s Farmers Market SNAP Support Grants (FMSSG), five market organizations employed focus groups in 2016 to refine their SNAP marketing strategy and uncover any remaining barriers for SNAP shoppers at farmers markets. This case study profiles those efforts and includes links to available resources and contact information. (Author abstract)

    With funding from the USDA Food and Nutrition Service’s Farmers Market SNAP Support Grants (FMSSG), five market organizations employed focus groups in 2016 to refine their SNAP marketing strategy and uncover any remaining barriers for SNAP shoppers at farmers markets. This case study profiles those efforts and includes links to available resources and contact information. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Carson, Jessica A.; Mattingly, Marybeth J.; Schaefer, Andrew
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    In 2015, for the second year in a row, child poverty rates declined in the United States. However, familiar patterns in levels and characteristics of child poverty persist: more than one in five children are poor; children of color are at disproportionate risk for poverty; and rates are highest in the South and West and in rural areas and cities (Table 1). This brief uses data from the American Community Survey to investigate patterns of child poverty across race-ethnicities and across regions and place types. We also explore changes in child poverty rates since 2014 and since the end of the Great Recession in 2009. The estimates presented in this brief are based on the official poverty measure (see Box 1 on page 3). Native Americans, Alaskan and Hawaiian natives, and those reporting multiple racial-ethnic backgrounds are excluded from this update because such samples are too small for meaningful analyses. (Author abstract)

    In 2015, for the second year in a row, child poverty rates declined in the United States. However, familiar patterns in levels and characteristics of child poverty persist: more than one in five children are poor; children of color are at disproportionate risk for poverty; and rates are highest in the South and West and in rural areas and cities (Table 1). This brief uses data from the American Community Survey to investigate patterns of child poverty across race-ethnicities and across regions and place types. We also explore changes in child poverty rates since 2014 and since the end of the Great Recession in 2009. The estimates presented in this brief are based on the official poverty measure (see Box 1 on page 3). Native Americans, Alaskan and Hawaiian natives, and those reporting multiple racial-ethnic backgrounds are excluded from this update because such samples are too small for meaningful analyses. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Shapiro, Rachel; Wood, Robert G.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This brief highlights key findings from the implementation of an adapted version of Reducing the Risk, a comprehensive sex education program. The program was delivered by health educators in relatively low-income, mostly rural, high schools in the Barren River and Lincoln Trail District Health Departments in Kentucky during the 2013-2014 and 2014-2015 school years. (Author abstract)

    This brief highlights key findings from the implementation of an adapted version of Reducing the Risk, a comprehensive sex education program. The program was delivered by health educators in relatively low-income, mostly rural, high schools in the Barren River and Lincoln Trail District Health Departments in Kentucky during the 2013-2014 and 2014-2015 school years. (Author abstract)

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