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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Carson, Jessica A.; Mattingly, Marybeth J.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    In this brief, we use interview and focus group data to describe some of the ways that restricted rural housing stock affects working families in two rural New England counties, and explore solutions proposed by rural residents and experts to make housing affordable (see Box 1 on page 2). Rural amenities and scenery make residence in certain New England regions desirable for second-home owners, vacationers, and retirees. However, the use of housing for these purposes, combined with efforts to conserve acreage and preserve scenery, serves to diminish the supply of housing, making it unaffordable for many low- and moderate-income residents. Moreover, the housing that is available varies in quality, and regional nonprofit and federal housing assistance programs lack the capacity to meet all residents' needs. (Author abstract)

    This report was also published as an Issue Brief at the Carsey Institute for Public Policy at the University of New Hampshire.

    In this brief, we use interview and focus group data to describe some of the ways that restricted rural housing stock affects working families in two rural New England counties, and explore solutions proposed by rural residents and experts to make housing affordable (see Box 1 on page 2). Rural amenities and scenery make residence in certain New England regions desirable for second-home owners, vacationers, and retirees. However, the use of housing for these purposes, combined with efforts to conserve acreage and preserve scenery, serves to diminish the supply of housing, making it unaffordable for many low- and moderate-income residents. Moreover, the housing that is available varies in quality, and regional nonprofit and federal housing assistance programs lack the capacity to meet all residents' needs. (Author abstract)

    This report was also published as an Issue Brief at the Carsey Institute for Public Policy at the University of New Hampshire.

  • Individual Author: Snell-Rood, Claire; Feltner, Frances; Schoenberg, Nancy
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2018

    The prevalence of depression among rural women is nearly twice the national average, yet limited mental health services and extensive social barriers restrict access to needed treatment. We conducted key informant interviews with community health workers (CHWs) and diverse health care professionals who provide care to Appalachian women with depression to better understand the potential roles that CHWs may play to improve women’s treatment engagement. In the gap created by service disparities and social barriers, CHWs can offer a substantial contribution through improving recognition of depression; deepening rural women’s engagement within existing services; and offering sustained, culturally appropriate support. (Author abstract)

    The prevalence of depression among rural women is nearly twice the national average, yet limited mental health services and extensive social barriers restrict access to needed treatment. We conducted key informant interviews with community health workers (CHWs) and diverse health care professionals who provide care to Appalachian women with depression to better understand the potential roles that CHWs may play to improve women’s treatment engagement. In the gap created by service disparities and social barriers, CHWs can offer a substantial contribution through improving recognition of depression; deepening rural women’s engagement within existing services; and offering sustained, culturally appropriate support. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Briefel, Ronette; Melia, Micah; Harvey, Bonnie; Forrestal, Sarah; Chojnacki, Gregory ; Caronongan, Pia; Gothro, Andrew; Cabili, Charlotte; Kleinman, Rebecca; Gabor, Vivian; Redel, Nicholas; Gleason, Philip
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    This study—authorized by the 2010 Child Nutrition Act—tests innovative strategies to end childhood hunger and food insecurity. The interim evaluation report describes (1) the demonstration projects, (2) planning and early implementation activities, and (3) findings from the baseline data collection for four projects located within Chickasaw Nation, Kentucky, Nevada, and Virginia. A fifth demonstration project was implemented in Navajo Nation but not evaluated due to changes in program design. The demonstrations occurred during 2015-2017 and operated for 12 to 24 months. (Author abstract) 

    This study—authorized by the 2010 Child Nutrition Act—tests innovative strategies to end childhood hunger and food insecurity. The interim evaluation report describes (1) the demonstration projects, (2) planning and early implementation activities, and (3) findings from the baseline data collection for four projects located within Chickasaw Nation, Kentucky, Nevada, and Virginia. A fifth demonstration project was implemented in Navajo Nation but not evaluated due to changes in program design. The demonstrations occurred during 2015-2017 and operated for 12 to 24 months. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Goesling, Brian; Lee, Joanne; Wood, Robert G.; Zief, Susan
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    This report presents evidence on the longer-term impacts of an adapted version of the Reducing the Risk teen pregnancy prevention curriculum in rural Kentucky. Although rural counties have the highest teen birth rates in the United States, teen pregnancy prevention practitioners and researchers have developed and tested relatively few programs for youth in rural areas. To add to the research on effective pregnancy prevention approaches for youth in rural areas, the Administration for Children and Families within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services funded a rigorous evaluation of an adapted, eight-hour version of Reducing the Risk in 13 high schools in a primarily rural area of central and southwestern Kentucky. The program was delivered by trained staff from two local health departments in Kentucky with federal grant funding from the Personal Responsibility Education Program (PREP). (Author abstract)

     

    This report presents evidence on the longer-term impacts of an adapted version of the Reducing the Risk teen pregnancy prevention curriculum in rural Kentucky. Although rural counties have the highest teen birth rates in the United States, teen pregnancy prevention practitioners and researchers have developed and tested relatively few programs for youth in rural areas. To add to the research on effective pregnancy prevention approaches for youth in rural areas, the Administration for Children and Families within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services funded a rigorous evaluation of an adapted, eight-hour version of Reducing the Risk in 13 high schools in a primarily rural area of central and southwestern Kentucky. The program was delivered by trained staff from two local health departments in Kentucky with federal grant funding from the Personal Responsibility Education Program (PREP). (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Erb-Downward, Jennifer; Evangelist, Michael
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    Children need stability to thrive, but for the more than 36,000 children in Michigan’s elementary, middle and high schools who face homelessness, stability is often elusive. Under federal education law all children and youth who “lack a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence” are homeless. These children not only lack a stable place to call home, they are more likely to transfer schools, have long commutes, struggle with poor health, and be chronically absent than their non-homeless peers. All of these daily challenges place homeless students at a greater risk for not meeting grade-level standards and for dropping out of school. Recent research in the State of Michigan has shown homelessness among children to be a key factor predicting student achievement in both rural and urban areas, yet little attention has been given, thus far, to understanding where homeless students in Michigan attend school and how their needs might differ depending on their geographic location. This policy brief seeks to fill that gap so that policymakers and local stakeholders can begin to...

    Children need stability to thrive, but for the more than 36,000 children in Michigan’s elementary, middle and high schools who face homelessness, stability is often elusive. Under federal education law all children and youth who “lack a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence” are homeless. These children not only lack a stable place to call home, they are more likely to transfer schools, have long commutes, struggle with poor health, and be chronically absent than their non-homeless peers. All of these daily challenges place homeless students at a greater risk for not meeting grade-level standards and for dropping out of school. Recent research in the State of Michigan has shown homelessness among children to be a key factor predicting student achievement in both rural and urban areas, yet little attention has been given, thus far, to understanding where homeless students in Michigan attend school and how their needs might differ depending on their geographic location. This policy brief seeks to fill that gap so that policymakers and local stakeholders can begin to think about the impact of homelessness in their area and to identify resources to support some of the State’s most vulnerable children. Data for this brief comes from school year 2015-16 administrative records collected by every school under the mandate of the Federal McKinney-Vento Act, a law which guarantees homeless student’s right to an education. (Author abstract)

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