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Income disparities in perceived neighborhood built and social environment attributes

Date Added to Library: 
Saturday, June 30, 2018 - 01:36
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): 
10.1016/j.healthplace.2011.02.006
Priority: 
normal
Individual Author: 
Sallis, James F.
Slymen, Donald J.
Conway, Terry L.
Frank, Lawrence D.
Saelens, Brian E.
Cain, Kelli
Chapman, James E.
Reference Type: 
Publisher: 
Published Date: 
November 2011
Published Date (Text): 
November 2011
Publication: 
Health & Place
Volume: 
17
Issue Number: 
7
Page Range: 
1274-83
Year: 
2011
Language(s): 
Abstract: 

The present study explored whether perceived neighborhood environmental attributes associated with physical activity differ by neighborhood income. Adults aged 20-65 years (n=2199; 48% female; mean age=45 years; 26% ethnic minority) were recruited from 32 neighborhoods from the Seattle, WA and Baltimore, MD regions that varied in objectively measured walkability and neighborhood income. Perceived built and social environment variables were assessed with the Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale. There were neighborhood income disparities on 10 of 15 variables. Residents from high-income neighborhoods reported more favorable esthetics, pedestrian/biking facilities, safety from traffic, safety from crime, and access to recreation facilities than residents of low-income areas (all p's <0.001). Low-income neighborhoods may lack amenities and safety attributes that can facilitate high levels of physical activity for both transportation and recreation purposes. (Author abstract)

Geographic Focus: 
Page Count: 
10
Topical Area: 
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