Skip to main content
Back to Top

Getting a job is only half the battle: Maternal job loss and child classroom behavior in low-income families

Date Added to Library: 
Wednesday, April 26, 2017 - 11:16
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): 
10.1002/pam.20565
Priority: 
normal
Individual Author: 
Hill, Heather D.
Morris, Pamela A.
Castells, Nina
Walker, Jessica T.
Reference Type: 
Published Date: 
Spring 2011
Published Date (Text): 
Spring 2011
Publication: 
Journal of Policy Analysis and Management
Volume: 
30
Issue Number: 
2
Page Range: 
310–333
Year: 
2011
Language(s): 
Abstract: 

This study uses data from an experimental employment program and instrumental variables (IV) estimation to examine the effects of maternal job loss on child classroom behavior. Random assignment to the treatment at one of three program sites is an exogenous predictor of employment patterns. Cross-site variation in treatment-control differences is used to identify the effects of employment levels and transitions. Under certain assumptions, this method controls for unobserved correlates of job loss and child well-being, as well as measurement error and simultaneity. IV estimates suggest that maternal job loss sharply increases problem behavior but has neutral effects on positive social behavior. Current employment programs concentrate primarily on job entry, but these findings point to the importance of promoting job stability for workers and their children. (Author abstract)

Page Count: 
24
Share/Save
Research Notes: 
Unsure about methodology: article says it combines experimental data with the instrumental variables (IV) estimator. Also says the following: "We estimate the effect of job loss using only individuals for whom random assignment either led to one or more job losses that would not have happened otherwise (treatment group) or fore-stalled job losses that would have happened in the context of the treatment (control group)." (MCM 4/27/17). Consulted with Fadumo, agreed on Quant-nonexperimental (MCM 5/15/17).

The SSRC is here to help you! Do you need more information on this record?

If you are unable to access the full-text of the article from the Public URL provided, please email our Librarians for assistance at ssrc@opressrc.org.

In addition to the information on this record provided by the SSRC, you may be able to use the following options to find an electronic copy from an online subscription service or your local library:

  • Worldcat to find an electronic copy from an online subscription service
  • Google Scholar to discover other full text options