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Examining the impact of the family violence option on women's efforts to leave welfare

Date Added to Library: 
Wednesday, February 8, 2012 - 13:46
ISBN/ISSN: 
10497315
Priority: 
normal
Individual Author: 
Hetling, Andrea
Born, Catherine E.
Reference Type: 
Publisher: 
Published Date: 
May 2005
Published Date (Text): 
May 2005
Publication: 
Research on Social Work Practice
Volume: 
15
Issue Number: 
3
Page Range: 
143-153
Year: 
2005
Language(s): 
Abstract: 

Objective: The establishment of the Family Violence Option (FVO) in 1997 was met with some controversy, as critics believed waivers from time limit and work requirements would hinder women's ability to leave welfare and find employment. Method: Using administrative and interview data from Maryland, multivariate equations analyze if domestic violence disclosure, administrative documentation, or waiver use had a statistically significant affect on one year employment and welfare use outcomes of individuals. Results: Waiver holders did not differ from nonvictims, but victims who are not documented received fewer months of welfare and earned less income. Conclusions: Findings do not indicate that FVO waivers encourage women to stay on welfare longer. However, the poor outcomes of undocumented victims indicate that some individuals may be slipping through the cracks of a well-intentioned policy. (author abstract)

Target Populations: 
Geographic Focus: 
Page Count: 
11
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