Skip to main content
Back to Top

The environment of childhood poverty

Date Added to Library: 
Thursday, July 9, 2015 - 18:39
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): 
10.1037/0003-066X.59.2.77
Priority: 
high
Individual Author: 
Evans, Gary
Reference Type: 
Research Methodology: 
Published Date: 
February-March 2004
Published Date (Text): 
February-March 2004
Publication: 
American Psychologist
Volume: 
59
Issue Number: 
2
Page Range: 
77-92
Year: 
2004
Language(s): 
Abstract: 

Poor children confront widespread environmental inequities. Compared with their economically advantaged counterparts, they are exposed to more family turmoil, violence, separation from their families, instability, and chaotic households. Poor children experience less social support, and their parents are less responsive and more authoritarian. Low-income children are read to relatively infrequently, watch more TV, and have less access to books and computers. Low-income parents are less involved in their children's school activities. The air and water poor children consume are more polluted. Their homes are more crowded, noisier, and of lower quality. Low-income neighborhoods are more dangerous, offer poorer municipal services, and suffer greater physical deterioration. Predominantly low-income schools and day care are inferior. The accumulation of multiple environmental risks rather than singular risk exposure may be an especially pathogenic aspect of childhood poverty. (author abstract)

Target Populations: 
Geographic Focus: 
Page Count: 
16
Share/Save

The SSRC is here to help you! Do you need more information on this record?

If you are unable to access the full-text of the article from the Public URL provided, please email our Librarians for assistance at ssrc@opressrc.org.

In addition to the information on this record provided by the SSRC, you may be able to use the following options to find an electronic copy from an online subscription service or your local library:

  • Worldcat to find an electronic copy from an online subscription service
  • Google Scholar to discover other full text options