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Employer demand for welfare recipients by race

Date Added to Library: 
Friday, September 14, 2012 - 11:55
Priority: 
normal
Individual Author: 
Holzer, Harry J.
Stoll, Michael A.
Reference Type: 
Published Date: 
October 2000
Published Date (Text): 
October 2000
Publication: 
Discussion Paper
Issue Number: 
1213-00
Year: 
2000
Language(s): 
Abstract: 

This paper uses new survey data on employers in four large metropolitan areas to examine the determinants of employer demand for welfare recipients. The results suggest a high level of demand for welfare recipients, though such demand appears fairly sensitive to business cycle conditions. A broad range of factors, including skill needs and industry, affect the prospective demand for welfare recipients among employers, while other characteristics that affect the relative supply of welfare recipients to these employers (such as location and employer use of local agencies or welfare-to-work programs) influence the extent to which such demand is realized in actual hiring. Moreover, the conditional demand for black (and to a lesser extent Hispanic) welfare recipients lags behind their representation in the welfare population and seems to be more heavily affected by employers' location and indicators of preferences than by their skill needs or overall hiring activity. Thus, a variety of factors on the demand side of the labor market continue to limit the employment options of welfare recipients, especially those who are minorities. (author abstract)

Page Count: 
47
Topical Area: 
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