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Closing the skills gap: Preparing New Yorkers for high-growth, high-demand, middle-skill jobs

Date Added to Library: 
Tuesday, January 26, 2016 - 16:05
Priority: 
normal
Organizational Author: 
J.P Morgan Chase & Co.
Individual Author: 
Dimon, Jamie
Barnes, Melody
Reference Type: 
Published Date: 
2014
Published Date (Text): 
2014
Publication: 
New Skills At Work
Year: 
2014
Language(s): 
Abstract: 

Unemployment remains high across the globe, yet recent data reveals that employers are having trouble finding workers in key sectors. As part of our five-year, $250 million New Skills at Work initiative, we are releasing a series of skills gap reports in nine metro areas in the United States, as well as in France, Germany, Spain and the UK. The reports focus on middle skills jobs – those that require a high school degree and technical training but not a BA diploma.

The first report released is focused on New York City and reveals that there are increasing opportunities for middle-skill jobs seekers in the healthcare and tech sectors. It provides the foundation for steps city policy makers, community colleges, training providers and private sector employers can take to fill specific jobs in these industries and provide economic opportunity to more New Yorkers. Later this year, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio's Jobs for New Yorkers Task Force will use the report results to develop data-driven skill building workforce investments in the city (author abstract).

Geographic Focus: 
Page Count: 
32
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