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Air pollution around schools is linked to poorer student health and academic performance

Date Added to Library: 
Tuesday, August 29, 2017 - 16:28
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): 
10.1377/hlthaff.2011.0077
Priority: 
normal
Individual Author: 
Mohai, Paul
Kweon, Byoung-Suk
Lee, Sangyun
Ard, Kerry
Reference Type: 
Published Date: 
Volume: 
30
Issue Number: 
5
Page Range: 
852-862
Year: 
2011
Language(s): 
Abstract: 

Exposing children to environmental pollutants during important times of physiological development can lead to long-lasting health problems, dysfunction, and disease. The location of children’s schools can increase their exposure. We examined the extent of air pollution from industrial sources around public schools in Michigan to find out whether air pollution jeopardizes children’s health and academic success. We found that schools located in areas with the highest air pollution levels had the lowest attendance rates—a potential indicator of poor health—and the highest proportions of students who failed to meet state educational testing standards. Michigan and many other states currently do not require officials considering a site for a new school to analyze its environmental quality. Our results show that such requirements are needed. For schools already in existence, we recommend that their environmental quality should be investigated and improved if necessary. (Author abstract)

Geographic Focus: 
Page Count: 
11
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Keyword: 
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